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Monday, 23 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games: OSK, ATOM RPG, Battle Royale Tycoon and More Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 2:01pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 11:02am
Story Devices: HEGduino Alaskit, Piper Computer Kit 2 and Intel NUC Mini PC Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 9:33am
Story DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER2 Gets Basic FSCK Support Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 9:15am
Story A Look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta and Report From Akademy 2019 Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 9:10am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 9:08am
Story Excellent Utilities: Liquid Prompt – adaptive prompt for Bash & Zsh Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 8:38am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 8:36am
Story Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News and GNU World Order Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 8:29am
Story Introduction to the Linux chgrp and newgrp commands Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2019 - 7:39am

Games: OSK, ATOM RPG, Battle Royale Tycoon and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Race through a dying world as a squirrel in the climbing platformer OSK, out now

    OSK from the single-person studio Diax Game is officially out and it has a really beautiful style to it.

    In OSK the world is dying, some sort of cataclysmic event is happening below and as a squirrel you're just doing what you know—climbing. To get away from the absolute chaos, the game has you climb an enormous tree while you also solve puzzles and avoid enemies.

  • ATOM RPG had another massive update recently adding in an Isometric mode

    ATOM RPG, the game inspired by the likes of Fallout and Wasteland continues to get some big free updates with an Isometric mode out now giving you a new way to play.

    While the team is currently working on the Trudograd standalone, it was originally a feature meant for that but they decided to give it to everyone free—awesome!

  • Build and run your own Battle Royale park in Battle Royale Tycoon out now

    Not quite the usual Battle Royale, here you're the one in charge. Battle Royale Tycoon is like a more violent and simple version of Parkitect. Note: Key provided to our Steam Curator.

    After being in Early Access since December last year, Endless Loop Studios (Ninja Tycoon, Blueprint Tycoon, Hyper Knights) decided this month it was time to remove the EA sticker and let everyone jump in.

  • Historical turn-based 4X strategy game 'BOC' sounds intriguing and it's coming to Linux

    Planned to released on Steam and GOG (if GOG approve) after an upcoming Kickstarter campaign, BOC seems like a very interesting turn-based 4X coming to Linux.

    Interesting for more reasons than just style and gameplay, as developer Code::Arts say they've worked on their own multi-platform OpenGL/Vulkan game engine they've called the Deus Ex Machina engine. Their aim with it, is to have a game engine that focuses on "performance and the efficient use of resources" so that it could "run on a toaster". Starting development back in 2018, their current aim is to have something playable and ready for Early Access next year.

  • Running DOSBox games from Steam on Linux just got better with a fresh release of Boxtron for Steam Play

    Love your classic games? Have a lot of those classics on Steam? You need to grab Boxtron, the unofficial Steam Play tool that allows you to use a native DOSBox with Steam games even if they don't have a Linux build up.

    As a quick refresher Boxtron improves the experience by giving lower input lag, better fullscreen support, Steam Overlay and other Steam feature support and so on. Compared to running games through Proton or messing about with a manual DOSBox configuration it makes things nice and simple.

  • Snowtopia: Ski Resort Tycoon is heading to Steam next year, early build to try on itch.io

    Up for playing another building and management tycoon game? Snowtopia: Ski Resort Tycoon is one we talked about briefly back in January and it seems to be progressing along nicely.

    We've had standard theme park building sims, we've had a Battle Royale building sim, city builders and so much more. A Ski Resort you build up yourself though? That's something we haven't really seen before on Linux, not something that's exactly common on any platform though either.

Devices: HEGduino Alaskit, Piper Computer Kit 2 and Intel NUC Mini PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • HEGduino IoT Real-time Neurofeedback Platform Aims to Increase Brain Function (Crowdfunding)

    The HEGduino Alaskit has developed a way to measure the blood-oxygen levels in the brain and create a biofeedback system that is said to increase brain function.

  • Piper Computer Kit 2 is a DIY Raspberry Pi 3 Computer for Kids’ Education

    Kids can easily build theirs own computer and then learn more about electronics and programming thanks to Piper Computer Kit 2.

  • Essential Accessories for Intel NUC Mini PC

    I bought a barebone Intel NUC mini PC a few weeks back. I installed Linux on it and I am totally enjoying it. This tiny fanless gadget replaces that bulky CPU of the desktop computer.

    Intel NUC mostly comes in barebone format which means it doesn’t have any RAM, hard disk and obviously no operating system. Many Linux-based mini PCs customize the Intel NUC and sell them to end users by adding disk, RAM and operating systems.

    Needless to say that it doesn’t come with keyboard, mouse or screen just like most other desktop computers out there.

DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER2 Gets Basic FSCK Support

Filed under
BSD

While the Copy-on-Write file-system shouldn't technically require fsck support, basic file-system consistency checking support has been implemented anyhow. In the initial implementation, the fsck code for HAMMER2 cannot repair any damaged file-system but can only verify that the file-system is intact.

Read more

A Look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta and Report From Akademy 2019

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta, enjoy!

  • TSDgeos' blog: Akademy 2019

    It's 10 days already since Akademy 2019 finished and I'm already missing it Confused

    Akademy is a week-long action-packed conference, talks, BoFs, daytrip, dinner with old and new friends, it's all a great combination and shows how amazing KDE (yes, the community, that's our name) is.

    On the talks side i missed some that i wanted to attend because i had to extend my time at the registration booth helping fellow KDE people that had forgotten to register (yes, our setup could be a bit easier, doesn't help that you have to register for talks, for travel support and for the actual conference in three different places), but I am not complaining, you get to interact with lots of people in the registration desk, it's a good way to meet people you may not have met otherwise, so please make sure you volunteer next year Wink

    One of the talks i want to highlight is Dan VrĂĄtil's talk about C++, I agree with him that we could do much better in making our APIs more expressive using the power of "modern" C++ (when do we stop it calling modern?). It's a pity that the slides are not up so you'll have to live with KĂŠvin Ottens sketch of it for now.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • DevNation Live: Event-driven business automation powered by cloud-native Java

    DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, presented by Red Hat’s Maciej Swiderski, Principal Software Engineer, and Burr Sutter, Chief Developer Evangelist, you’ll learn about event-driven business automation using Kogito, Quarkus, and more.

    Kogito is a new Java toolkit, based on Drools and jBPM, that’s made to bring rules and processes to the Quarkus world. This DevNation Live presentation shows how Kogito can be used to build cloud-ready, event-driven business applications, and it includes a demo of implementing the business logic of a complex domain.

    Kogito itself is defined as a cloud-native business automation toolkit that helps you to build intelligent applications. It’s way more than just a business process or a single business rule—it’s a bunch of business rules, and it’s based on battle-tested capabilities.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.1 Brings CUDA CUStream Support, Other Encoder Improvements

    Following the February release of Video Codec SDK 9.0, NVIDIA recently did a quiet release of the Video Codec SDK 9.1 update that furthers along this cross-platform video encode/decode library.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Peter Farrell

    This week we welcome Peter Farrell (@hackingmath) as our PyDev of the Week! Peter is the author Math Adventures with Python and two other math related Python books. You can learn more about Peter by visiting his website.

  • Mutation testing by example: How to leverage failure
  • Reuven Lerner: Looking for Python podcast co-hosts

    As you might know, I’m a panelist on the weekly “Freelancers Show” podcast, which talks about the business of freelancing.

    The good news: The same company that’s behind the Freelancers Show, Devchat.tv, is putting together a weekly podcast about Python, and I’m going to be on that, too! We’ll have a combination of discussion, interviews with interesting people in the Python community, and (friendly) debates over the current and future state of the language.

  • Getting started with data science using Python

    Data science is an exciting new field in computing that's built around analyzing, visualizing, correlating, and interpreting the boundless amounts of information our computers are collecting about the world. Of course, calling it a "new" field is a little disingenuous because the discipline is a derivative of statistics, data analysis, and plain old obsessive scientific observation.

    But data science is a formalized branch of these disciplines, with processes and tools all its own, and it can be broadly applied across disciplines (such as visual effects) that had never produced big dumps of unmanageable data before. Data science is a new opportunity to take a fresh look at data from oceanography, meteorology, geography, cartography, biology, medicine and health, and entertainment industries and gain a better understanding of patterns, influences, and causality.

    Like other big and seemingly all-inclusive fields, it can be intimidating to know where to start exploring data science. There are a lot of resources out there to help data scientists use their favorite programming languages to accomplish their goals, and that includes one of the most popular programming languages out there: Python. Using the Pandas, Matplotlib, and Seaborn libraries, you can learn the basic toolset of data science.

Excellent Utilities: Liquid Prompt – adaptive prompt for Bash & Zsh

Filed under
Software
HowTos

This is a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’re covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. There’s a complete list of the tools in this series in the Summary section.

The Command Line Interface (CLI) is a way of interacting with your computer. And if you ever want to harness all the power of Linux, it’s highly recommended to master it. It’s true the CLI is often perceived as a barrier for users migrating to Linux, particularly if they’re grown up using GUI software exclusively. While Linux rarely forces anyone to use the CLI, some tasks are better suited to this method of interaction, offering inducements like superior scripting opportunities, remote access, and being far more frugal with a computer’s resources.

For anyone spending time at the CLI, they’ll rely on the shell prompt. My favorite shell is Bash. By default, the configuration for Bash on popular distributions identifies the user name, hostname, and the current working directory. All essential information. But with Liquid Prompt you can display additional information such as battery status, CPU temperature, and much more.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News and GNU World Order

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS
Security

Introduction to the Linux chgrp and newgrp commands

Filed under
Linux

In a recent article, I introduced the chown command, which is used for modifying ownership of files on systems. Recall that ownership is the combination of the user and group assigned to an object. The chgrp and newgrp commands provide additional help for managing files that need to maintain group ownership.

It is important to understand how to manage users, groups, and permissions. It is also good to know a few alternative ways to work around problems you might encounter since not all environments are set up the same way.

Read more

Linux-Powered BeagleBoard AI Comes With Debian Out-of-the-box

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Linux-powered BeabgleBoard AI Single Board Computer (SBC) has been launched by the BeagleBoard foundation at a $125 price tag. The new SBC runs Debian GNU/Linux out of the box.

The organization says that the new SBC fills the gap between small Raspberry Pi-like computers and more powerful desktop machines.

The BeagleBoard AI was shown way back in February 2019 and now it has finally been launched.

In my experience, Beagleboard computers are really awesome devices. We have even included the original Beagleboard, the Beagleboard Black and the X15 on our list of “Best Raspberry-Pi Alternatives.”

Read more

Redcore Linux 1908 LXQt

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Redcore is a Gentoo-based project which strives to make it easy to install the distribution and immediately have access to a pre-configured desktop environment. Redcore is available in two editions, KDE Plasma and LXQt, and offers builds for 64-bit (x86_64) machines exclusively. The latest version of Redcore Linux has shifted from using Gentoo's Stable branch as its upstream source to Gentoo Testing. Software now flows from Gentoo Testing, into Redcore's Testing repository, and then into Redcore Stable where most Redcore users will access it.

The Redcore ISO files are relatively large with both editions being 3.4GB downloads. Given the similarities in size, I decided to try the LXQt edition. Booting from the Redcore media brings up a graphical login screen with a mostly-white background. We can sign into the live desktop using the username and password "redcore". The default wallpaper is mostly white with abstract lines. The combination makes for a bright screen populated with harsh lines that I personally found unpleasant and I soon switch to another background.

There are two icons on the LXQt desktop. One opens the Calamares installer and the other is labelled "Ask for help". Clicking the latter icon causes LXQt to pop-up an error saying the selected icon is an invalid desktop entry file. Clicking the installer icon brings up a prompt asking if we would like to open or execute the installer's desktop file. Along the bottom of the screen we find a panel containing the application menu, task switcher and system tray.

Read more

Building A Linux HTPC / Storage Server With The SilverStone CS381

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

SilverStone recently sent over their CS381 chassis that has proven to be quite a versatile micro-ATX enclosure that can accommodate up to twelve hard drives (eight of which are hot-swappable) all while coming in at just 400 x 225 x 316mm. The SilverStone CS381 could work quite well as a Linux HTPC / DIY Steam Linux gaming living room PC or SOHO file server system with its compact size while offering immense storage potential. Here's more on the SilverStone CS381 and our build with using a Ryzen 5 3400G that is playing well under Linux with an ASUS B450 motherboard.

It's been a while since last taking a look at any SilverStone enclosure, but with continuing to be impressed by their high-end cases over the years, it was exciting to look at the CS381 from their Case Storage Series. The key features of this case are offering support for up to twelve HDD/SSDs, up to a microATX motherboard, and other components while occupying just 30 liters of space. The case can be positioned in either a vertical or horizontal position depending upon the environment and eight of the drives being hot-swappable primes the case for interesting storage server options.

Read more

Intel Icelake Thunderbolt Support, Stratix10 Additions & Other Material Hits Linux 5.4

Filed under
Linux

The "char/misc" changes for the Linux 5.4 are as eventful as ever.

Greg Kroah-Hartman sent in the char/misc changes earlier this week for the Linux 5.4 merge window that's now half-way through. The since merged material contains a lot of notable hardware support improvements.

Exciting us the most is that the Intel Icelake Thunderbolt support is now squared away. Intel had most of the Icelake CPU support in good shape going back months including for the Gen11 graphics, but the Thunderbolt support was the last holdout. With Icelake, the Thunderbolt controller has moved onto the CPU package itself sans the power deliver infrastructure. These changes yielded additional work to get Icelake Thunderbolt support going under Linux, but it's finally there for Linux 5.4 with Icelake laptops beginning to hit retail channels.

Read more

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Futureproofing Your Python Tools

    The people who maintain Python and key Python platforms want to help you protect the code you write and depend on.

    [...]

    Publishing that package is a great way of making it so other people can run and deploy it, even within other parts of your organization.

    But -- who actually has the keys to the castle? Who can upload a new version, or delete a version that has a problem?

    You should probably make sure multiple people have either "owner" or "maintainer" privileges on the project on PyPI.

    And you should review your project security history display, which lists sensitive events (such as "file removed from release version 1.0.1") in your PyPI user account and your PyPI project. We just added this display, so you can look at things that have happened in your user account or project, and check for signs someone's stolen your credentials.

  • py3status v3.20 – EuroPython 2019 edition

    Shame on me to post this so long after it happened… Still, that’s a funny story to tell and a lot of thank you to give so let’s go!

  • Finding Python Developers for Your Startup

    Recently I stumble across a situation while I was helping out for one of the events for JuniorDev SG.

    There was not a lot of Python developers and some of my other developer's friend.

    Said that they hardly encounter any developer friends who are using Python for their work.

    It begins during a conversation, where one of the attendees for a JuniorDev SG event.

    Approached me to search for Python developers to work for their startup based in Singapore.

Geary 3.34 Debuts with Deeper GNOME Contacts Integration, Other Changes

Filed under
GNOME

The Geary email client has issued a brand new release, and in this post I tell you a bit about it.

Geary 3.34.0 — you may recall that Geary switched to following GNOME numbering last year — is the latest update to this web-mail friendly mail tool, and there’s healthy dose of improvement on offer, as noted in the release notes.

Among them is deeper integration with GNOME Contacts. Geary’s in-app contacts pop-over now supports adding and editing contacts stored in the GNOME Contacts app, and is able to auto-complete email addresses based on data from contacts too.

Serial typo-makers like me will appreciate the spell checker now covering the mail composer’s subject line; while the addition of support for Outlook-specific email attachments (TNEF) will please those who regularly run in to issues on that front.

Other changes in Geary 3.34.0 include “a substantial number” of server compatibility improvements, background syncing tweaks, and other bug fixes.

Read more

Best free Linux firewalls of 2019: go beyond Iptables for desktops and servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Linux distros will often come with at least a basic firewall bundled with it. Often this won't be active by default so will need to be activated.

Additionally this will likely be the standard Iptables supplied, even though less experienced users may struggle with it. UFW - Uncomplicated Firewall is also bundled with some distros, and aims to make the process simpler.

However, there are distros and applications out there that can cater for the more advanced user and the less experienced one, making it easier to setup and configure a firewall that works for your needs.

Some, like ClearOS build it directly into the operating system as part of its security focus, but most other options would be applications that aim to block rogue IPs, monitor ports, and prevent otherwise prevent bad packets from interfering with your machine.

For most home users there are few actual settings that need to be customized, so simple apps can be popular, but for those looking to manage their machine as a server, additional controls and advanced command options will tend to be the more welcome.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER2 Gets Basic FSCK Support

While the Copy-on-Write file-system shouldn't technically require fsck support, basic file-system consistency checking support has been implemented anyhow. In the initial implementation, the fsck code for HAMMER2 cannot repair any damaged file-system but can only verify that the file-system is intact. Read more

A Look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta and Report From Akademy 2019

  • KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta, enjoy!

  • TSDgeos' blog: Akademy 2019

    It's 10 days already since Akademy 2019 finished and I'm already missing it :/ Akademy is a week-long action-packed conference, talks, BoFs, daytrip, dinner with old and new friends, it's all a great combination and shows how amazing KDE (yes, the community, that's our name) is. On the talks side i missed some that i wanted to attend because i had to extend my time at the registration booth helping fellow KDE people that had forgotten to register (yes, our setup could be a bit easier, doesn't help that you have to register for talks, for travel support and for the actual conference in three different places), but I am not complaining, you get to interact with lots of people in the registration desk, it's a good way to meet people you may not have met otherwise, so please make sure you volunteer next year ;) One of the talks i want to highlight is Dan VrĂĄtil's talk about C++, I agree with him that we could do much better in making our APIs more expressive using the power of "modern" C++ (when do we stop it calling modern?). It's a pity that the slides are not up so you'll have to live with KĂŠvin Ottens sketch of it for now.

Programming Leftovers

  • DevNation Live: Event-driven business automation powered by cloud-native Java

    DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, presented by Red Hat’s Maciej Swiderski, Principal Software Engineer, and Burr Sutter, Chief Developer Evangelist, you’ll learn about event-driven business automation using Kogito, Quarkus, and more. Kogito is a new Java toolkit, based on Drools and jBPM, that’s made to bring rules and processes to the Quarkus world. This DevNation Live presentation shows how Kogito can be used to build cloud-ready, event-driven business applications, and it includes a demo of implementing the business logic of a complex domain. Kogito itself is defined as a cloud-native business automation toolkit that helps you to build intelligent applications. It’s way more than just a business process or a single business rule—it’s a bunch of business rules, and it’s based on battle-tested capabilities.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.1 Brings CUDA CUStream Support, Other Encoder Improvements

    Following the February release of Video Codec SDK 9.0, NVIDIA recently did a quiet release of the Video Codec SDK 9.1 update that furthers along this cross-platform video encode/decode library.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Peter Farrell

    This week we welcome Peter Farrell (@hackingmath) as our PyDev of the Week! Peter is the author Math Adventures with Python and two other math related Python books. You can learn more about Peter by visiting his website.

  • Mutation testing by example: How to leverage failure
  • Reuven Lerner: Looking for Python podcast co-hosts

    As you might know, I’m a panelist on the weekly “Freelancers Show” podcast, which talks about the business of freelancing. The good news: The same company that’s behind the Freelancers Show, Devchat.tv, is putting together a weekly podcast about Python, and I’m going to be on that, too! We’ll have a combination of discussion, interviews with interesting people in the Python community, and (friendly) debates over the current and future state of the language.

  • Getting started with data science using Python

    Data science is an exciting new field in computing that's built around analyzing, visualizing, correlating, and interpreting the boundless amounts of information our computers are collecting about the world. Of course, calling it a "new" field is a little disingenuous because the discipline is a derivative of statistics, data analysis, and plain old obsessive scientific observation. But data science is a formalized branch of these disciplines, with processes and tools all its own, and it can be broadly applied across disciplines (such as visual effects) that had never produced big dumps of unmanageable data before. Data science is a new opportunity to take a fresh look at data from oceanography, meteorology, geography, cartography, biology, medicine and health, and entertainment industries and gain a better understanding of patterns, influences, and causality. Like other big and seemingly all-inclusive fields, it can be intimidating to know where to start exploring data science. There are a lot of resources out there to help data scientists use their favorite programming languages to accomplish their goals, and that includes one of the most popular programming languages out there: Python. Using the Pandas, Matplotlib, and Seaborn libraries, you can learn the basic toolset of data science.

Excellent Utilities: Liquid Prompt – adaptive prompt for Bash & Zsh

This is a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’re covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. There’s a complete list of the tools in this series in the Summary section. The Command Line Interface (CLI) is a way of interacting with your computer. And if you ever want to harness all the power of Linux, it’s highly recommended to master it. It’s true the CLI is often perceived as a barrier for users migrating to Linux, particularly if they’re grown up using GUI software exclusively. While Linux rarely forces anyone to use the CLI, some tasks are better suited to this method of interaction, offering inducements like superior scripting opportunities, remote access, and being far more frugal with a computer’s resources. For anyone spending time at the CLI, they’ll rely on the shell prompt. My favorite shell is Bash. By default, the configuration for Bash on popular distributions identifies the user name, hostname, and the current working directory. All essential information. But with Liquid Prompt you can display additional information such as battery status, CPU temperature, and much more. Read more