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Tuesday, 29 Sep 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Intel Hardware and Linux Work Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2020 - 2:01am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2020 - 1:49am
Story Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition Gets 11th-Gen Intel Refresh, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 6 30/09/2020 - 1:39am
Story Best Markdown Editors for Linux Roy Schestowitz 30/09/2020 - 1:31am
Story LibreOffice Reviews and Events Roy Schestowitz 1 29/09/2020 - 11:32pm
Story Security Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2020 - 11:25pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/09/2020 - 11:23pm
Story Fedora 33 Beta now available Rianne Schestowitz 4 29/09/2020 - 11:19pm
Story Python Programming Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2020 - 11:07pm
Story Linux Magazine's Latest Issue and 20th Birthday Roy Schestowitz 1 29/09/2020 - 10:45pm

Intel Hardware and Linux Work

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Has Been Working On OpenCL C 3.0 Support For Clang

    Intel's compiler experts in Moscow have been working on OpenCL C 3.0 support for the LLVM Clang compiler front-end.

    OpenCL 3.0 allows much greater flexibility in making OpenCL 2.x era features optional. With this on the compiler-side it's not very invasive when already supporting OpenCL 2.x functionality but a matter in part of just making very features optional.

  • Intel mOS, Torvalds Commentary, Intel Gen12 Graphics, Zen 2 "XT" CPUs Topped Q3
  • Intel oneAPI 1.0 Officially Released

    After announcing oneAPI at the end of 2018 and then going into beta last year, oneAPI 1.0 is now official for this open-source, standards-based unified programming model designed to support Intel's range of hardware from CPUs to GPUs to other accelerators like FPGAs. Intel's oneAPI initiative has been one of several exciting software efforts led by the company in recent years while continuing to serve as one of the world's largest contributors to open-source software.

  • Intel's oneAPI Is Coming To AMD Radeon GPUs

    While yesterday brought the release of Intel's oneAPI 1.0 specification, the interesting news today is that oneAPI support is coming to AMD Radeon graphics cards.

    Intel and the Heidelberg University Computing Center are announcing today they are establishing the "oneAPI Academic Center of Excellence." Great for academia, but what's more interesting to the masses that as part of that Intel and the University of Heidelberg are working to add oneAPI support for AMD Radeon GPUs.

  • Norbert Preining: Performance with Intel i218/i219 NIC

    I always had the feeling that my server, hosted by Hetzner, somehow has a slow internet connection. Then, I did put it on the distance between Finland and Japan, and didn’t care too much. Until yesterday my server stopped reacting to pings/ssh, and needed a hard reset. It turned out that the server was running fine, only that the ethernet card did hang. Hetzner support answered promptly and directed me to this web page, which described a change in the kernel concerning fragmentation offloading, and suggested the following configuration to regain connection speed:

    ethtool -K tso off gso off
    And to my surprise, this simple thing did wonder, and the connection speed improved dramatically, even from Japan (something like factor 10 in large rsync transfers). I have added this incantation to system cron tab and run it every hour, just to be sure that even after a reboot it is fine.

  • ASRock iBOX 1100 Industrial Mini PC Features Intel Tiger Lake UP3 Embedded Processor

    We recently covered COM Express and COM-HPC modules powered by Intel Tiger Lake UP3 embedded processors announced last week. ASRock is now the first company to officially announce a Tiger Lake UP3 mini PC based on the new 15W IoT processors.

    ASRock iBOX 1000 rugged embedded computer is fitted with the company’s NUC-1100 motherboard that offers four 4K display outputs, 2.5GbE networking, and various other expansions and I/Os in order to target factory automation, AGV, retail kiosk, digital signage, entertainment, transportation, and other AIoT applications.

  • Elkhart Lake modules available in Type 6, Type 10, and SMARC formats

    Kontron announced three Linux-friendly Elkhart Lake based compute modules with support for optional 2.5GbE: a COM Express Compact Type 6 “COMe-cEL6 (E2)” with up to 32GB DDR4-3200 plus a Mini Type 10 “COMe-mEL10 (E2)” and a “SMARC-sXEL (E2).”

    Kontron unveiled its first products based on Intel’s Elkhart Lake Atom x6000E, Pentium, and Celeron SoCs. The COM Express Compact Type 6 COMe-cEL6 (E2), COM Express Mini Type 10 COMe-mEL10 (E2), and SMARC 2.1 form-factor SMARC-sXEL (E2) will be available in 1Q 2021 with BSPs for Linux, Windows 10 IoT Enterprise, and VxWorks 7.0.

Best Markdown Editors for Linux

Filed under
Development
Software

This article will cover free and open source markdown editors available for Linux. You can use these apps to write documents, notes, ebooks etc. and format them for better readability and accessibility.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Python Programming

Filed under
Development

  • Teaching Comparing Strings in Python the Hard Way

    Some long-time subscribers may remember that I am teaching math to 10-18 year old students. The COVID-19 situation nearly made me quit and look for an alternative to earn my rent, but my love for the kids and teaching them was stronger. After a few months of shortage, we found ways to responsibly resume the meetings, either online or with safety measures.

    When schools were closed, some parents wondered what they could do to drag their offsprings away from computers; playing computer games seemed to be the new all-time favorite hobby. Of course, resistance was expected. Why not turn this interest into something useful? I didn’t expect that kids as young as eight are interested to learn how to create games. But why not? I learned from electronic magazines and books how computers, MS BASIC, and Z80 assembly worked when I was ten, and I am sure I would have been interested with eight, if my classmate had broken his leg two years earlier… But that’s not the story I want to tell.

  • This Python script mimics Babbage's Difference Engine

    After some contemplation, Charles Babbage's ghost replied, "This is all well and good, but here you only take the number of rows and give the number of marbles. With my table, I can also tell you how large a pyramid you might construct given a certain number of marbles; simply look it up in the table."

    Python had to agree that this was indeed the case, yet it knew that surely this must be solvable as well. With little delay, Python came back with another short script. The solution involves thinking through the math in reverse.

  • Setup and debug a Django app in PyCharm Community Edition

    Did you know that the freely available PyCharm community edition is perfectly suited for developing and debugging Django web applications? The goal of the article is to help you setup a new Django application framework in the PyCharm community edition, to the point that you can run and debug the Django application in PyCharm. We’ll also setup a virtual environment for the PyCharm project and install Django inside this virtual environment.

    [...]

    PyCharm comes in two editions: the professional edition and the community edition. The professional edition needs to be bought. In contrast, JetBrains makes the community edition free and open source. With other words, you can download the community edition for free and get started with it right away.

    When inspecting the differences between the PyCharm editions, you’ll notice that the PyCharm professional edition features all sort of Django specific support as you can read here. From this information you might think that you absolutely need to purchase the PyCharm professional edition, when programming and debugging Django applications. This is incorrect. You can definitely program and debug your Django application with the free PyCharm community edition. In this article, I’ll explain step-by-step how you can setup and debug a Django application in the free PyCharm community edition.

  • Using Google Login With Flask

    In this course, you’ll work through the creation of a Flask web application. Your application will allow a user to log in using their Google identity instead of creating a new account. There are tons of benefits with this method of user management. It’s going to be safer and simpler than managing the traditional username and password combinations.

  • Python Morsels: Writing a for loop

    You can use a for loop to loop over any iterable (iter-able). Anything you're able to iterate over can be looped over with a for loop.

  • Design of the Versioned HDF5 Library

    In a previous post, we introduced the Versioned HDF5 library and described some of its features. In this post, we'll go into detail on how the underlying design of the library works on a technical level.

    Versioned HDF5 is a library that wraps h5py and offers a versioned abstraction for HDF5 groups and datasets. Versioned HDF5 works fundamentally as a copy-on-write system. The basic idea of copy-on-write is that all data is effectively immutable in the backend. Whenever a high-level representation of data is modified, it is copied to a new location in the backend, leaving the original version intact. Any references to the original will continue to point to it.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #440 (Sept. 29, 2020)
  • Why use Python Programming for building a Healthcare Application

    Python is one of the best programming languages used across a plethora of industries. The healthcare sector is a significant benefactor of the language. With Python programming in healthcare, institutions and clinicians can deliver better patient outcomes through dynamic and scalable applications.

    Today, healthcare is generating tons of data from patients and facilities. By making the best use of this data, doctors can predict better treatment methods and improve the overall healthcare delivery system.

  • The Python return Statement: Usage and Best Practices

    The Python return statement is a key component of functions and methods. You can use the return statement to make your functions send Python objects back to the caller code. These objects are known as the function’s return value. You can use them to perform further computation in your programs.

    [...]

    Most programming languages allow you to assign a name to a code block that performs a concrete computation. These named code blocks can be reused quickly because you can use their name to call them from different places in your code.

    Programmers call these named code blocks subroutines, routines, procedures, or functions depending on the language they use. In some languages, there’s a clear difference between a routine or procedure and a function.

    Sometimes that difference is so strong that you need to use a specific keyword to define a procedure or subroutine and another keyword to define a function. For example the Visual Basic programming language uses Sub and Function to differentiate between the two.

  • Test and Code: 132: mocking in Python - Anna-Lena Popkes

    Using mock objects during testing in Python.

    Anna-Lena joins the podcast to teach us about mocks and using unittest.mock objects during testing.

  • Resources: Python for Kids

    Friend of Mu, Kevin Thomas has been hard at work creating free-to-use resources for kids (and older kids) who want to learn Python, with the BBC micro:bit and Mu.

    [...]

    Meanwhile, in our secret fortress of solitude, the Mu “minions” (Munions..?) have been hard at work on some fantastic updates which we hope to reveal very soon.

  • wxPython by Example – Drag-and-Drop an Image (Video)

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to drag an image into your #wxPython application and display it to your user.

  • Solving Python Package Creation For End User Applications With PyOxidizer - Episode 282

    Python is a powerful and expressive programming language with a vast ecosystem of incredible applications. Unfortunately, it has always been challenging to share those applications with non-technical end users. Gregory Szorc set out to solve the problem of how to put your code on someone else's computer and have it run without having to rely on extra systems such as virtualenvs or Docker. In this episode he shares his work on PyOxidizer and how it allows you to build a self-contained Python runtime along with statically linked dependencies and the software that you want to run. He also digs into some of the edge cases in the Python language and its ecosystem that make this a challenging problem to solve, and some of the lessons that he has learned in the process. PyOxidizer is an exciting step forward in the evolution of packaging and distribution for the Python language and community.

  • Sumana Harihareswara is an open-source software fairy... and other things I learned recording her DevJourney
  • All You Need To Know For Selenium Testing On The Cloud

    Building large-scale web applications take a monumental effort. Testing the quality of these applications requires a whole other level of dedication. From a developer’s vantage point, the focus is on improving the feature set, speeding up the overall performance, and building a scalable product. As far as QA is concerned, a lot of focus is on usability testing and compatibility testing while testing a website or web application.

    If you are building a consumer-facing website or web application, your product is likely to be accessed by users from across the globe. Your product must be tested on various combinations of web browsers, devices, and platforms (operating systems) to ensure top-notch performance. Hence, browser compatibility testing becomes even more critical. No one wants to lose potential customers because of unpleasant user experience on select few browsers, devices, or platforms.

  • Montreal Python User Group: Montréal-Python 80 – Pedal Kayak

    Greetings Python community, October is fast approaching with vibrant fall colour and our favourite apples. This is the occasion to set the table for our 80th event – Pedal Kayak – which will take place this coming October 26.

  • Simple FPS fingerprint similarity search: variations on a theme

    It's easy to write a fingerprint search tool. Peter Willett tells a story about how very soon after he, Winterman, and Bawden published Implementation of nearest-neighbor searching in an online chemical structure search system (1986) (which described their nearest-neighbor similarity search implementation and observed that Tanimoto similarity gave more satisfactory results than cosine similarity), he heard from a company which wrote their own implementation, on a Friday afternoon, and found it to be very useful.

    Now, my memory of his story may be missing in the details, but the key point is that it's always been easy to write a fingerprint similarity search tool. So, let's do it!

    I'll call my program ssimsearch because it's going to be a simplified version of chemfp's simsearch command-line tool. In fact, I'll hard-code just about everything, with only the bare minimum of checking.

3 Best Free and Open Source Linux Graphical FTP Clients

Filed under
Linux
OSS

File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a popular and time-honored method of transferring files to and from a remote network site. FTP is built on a client-server architecture and uses separate control and data connections between the client and server applications. The FTP client connects to the FTP server, and enables the user to send and retrieves files from that server.

FTP is one of many different file transfer protocols that are used. Other examples include the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), BitTorrent, the SSH File Transfer Protocol (SFTP), and Secure Copy (SCP).

Read more

Getting Started with Inkscape

Filed under
OSS

Welcome to the 1st part of computer graphic design for students. This is your easy guide to learn graphic editing with the software Inkscape. In this article you will learn both the theory and practice and followed by an exercise making your first design with logo and typography. Enjoy!

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Top 10 Linux Distributions that still support 32-Bit Architecture

Filed under
Linux

In case you own an old computer or laptop with out-of-date system resources but reliable hardware configuration, you’ve come to the right place because we’re going to list 10 Linux distributions that still support 32-bit architectures. These Linux distros will help you revive your PC and get it up to speed in no time. The reason why these lightweight Linux distros are still relevant and useful is that they only require low system resources and always provide high performance and lag-free user experience.

Despite being the recommended choices for older PCs with 32-bit processors, the following Linux distros work great on newer hardware as well. They will provide good performance if you’re looking to use your PC for rather demanding tasks such as video rendering and editing, etc.

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Nitrux 1.3.3 Released with KDE Plasma 5.19.5 Desktop, Smaller ISO Image

Filed under
Linux

Nitrux 1.3.3 comes exactly one month after Nitrux 1.3.2, which dropped systemd in favor of the OpenRC init system. This release brings the usual updates, starting with the latest KDE Plasma 5.19.5 desktop environment and continuing with the KDE Frameworks 5.74 and KDE Applications 20.08.1 software suites, built against Qt 5.15.

Among other updated components included in the Nitrux 1.3.3 update, there’s the Mozilla Firefox 81 web browser, LibreOffice 7.0.1 office suite, Inkscape 1.0.1 vector graphics editor, GIMP 2.10.20 image editor, Kdenlive 20.08.1 video editor, LMMS 1.2.2 digital audio workstation, and appimage-manager 0.1.2.

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Tracker 3.0: It’s Here!

Filed under
Software
GNOME

It’s too early to say “Job done”. But we’ve passed the biggest milestone on the project we announced last year: version 3.0 of Tracker is released and the rollout has begun!

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ingo announces pta (Plain Text Accounting)

    Recently, i got annoyed because i still didn't have a free accounting program that was to my liking. So i looked through the OpenBSD ports tree and briefly evaluated the programs i found there. None of them convinced me. Many seemed to have awkward user interfaces, some even require a GUI, and i definitely don't want a GUI. While i found every feature i wanted in at least one program, i failed to find any program having all the desired features. Some lack cost centers, some lack subaccounts, some lack support for handling unrealized profits and so on... I'm not absolutely convinced that i did not miss a good one, but at some point, it felt like i was wasting more time evaluting inadequate programs than might be needed to write an adequate one from scratch.

    Consequently, i released the plain text accounting program today. Version 0.1 should still be considered experimental, but i'm already using it in production for my own bookkeeping, and a friend of mine is likely to also start using it for their business in 2021, so it is very likely that it will be actively maintained.

  • Open Source Contributors: Who’s Missing--and Why?

    Open source software has indisputably advanced the software industry as a whole in myriad ways. It has fostered faster innovation. It has helped enable new paradigms, like DevOps. It has made all sorts of important software programs, from Web browsers to video editing software, accessible to people who, in past decades, could not have afforded them. Yet, open source also exemplifies, and exacerbates, a major challenge for the software industry: achieving greater demographic diversity. When you look at open source contributors, you find that most of them look very much alike: white and male.

    In fact, the open source space is even less diverse than the tech industry as a whole. And that's no mean feat, given how incredibly un-diverse tech companies in general tend to be.

    That's a fascinating reality, and it bears some investigation for anyone who wants to understand the dynamics that determine which sorts of people are envisioning, designing and writing some of the most important software platforms today--from Firefox and Apache to Linux and Kubernetes.

    [...]

    In some ways, these trends among open source contributors may seem unsurprising. It's not news that the tech space is mostly white and mostly male, and has been for decades.

    Yet, the fact that open source is even less diverse than tech in general seems harder to explain. If anything, you might think open source would be more diverse. After all, in many cases, the demographic identity of people who contribute to open source projects is not even known to others within those projects, unless for some reason they volunteer it. No one knows your race or gender by looking at your GitHub profile.

    For that reason, it would be hard to argue that active discrimination explains the demographic trends in open source. The lack of diversity at a company could be explained by hiring committees dismissing diverse candidates. But, in open source, there are no hiring committees or other gatekeeping bodies that have much insight into the demographic profile of contributors. You get judged on the quality of your code alone.

    [...]

    Coupled with the fact that many of the prominent white men in the open source space were quite well-off before they got involved in open source (Torvalds, who wrote the Linux kernel as a penniless college student, is an obvious exception), this is the most compelling explanation to me.

  • Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera takes photos through thousands of straws
  • 2020.39 The Releaser

    Alexander Kiryuhin has been very busy in the past week. Not only did they release a Comma Complete update (the Raku IDE of choice, now with 2020.02 IntelliJ support). They also released the Rakudo 2020.09 Compiler Release implementing the Raku Programming Language. And Claudio Ramirez made sure there are ready to download Linux packages for that release. And Timo Paulssen made sure there’s an AppImage for it as well!

  • Google Cloud Joins Linux Foundation Networking at Platinum Level

    LF Networking (LFN), which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across open source networking projects, announces Google Cloud has joined as a Platinum member. Since its beginnings, Google’s mission has been to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful, and Google Cloud’s vision is to be the most trusted, simple, innovative cloud for customers around the world. Through its membership, Google will further the acceleration of open source technologies across cloud native networking, telecoms, network automation, 5G, and more.

    “We look forward to working with all members and the larger community to continue to find ways to bring further value to consumers and communications services providers alike, demonstrating how public cloud can help fundamentally transform networking in new and exciting ways“, said Amol Phadke, Managing Director: Global Telecom Industry Solutions, Google Cloud. “Google’s excellence in creating and sponsoring components like Kuberntes, Istio and Knative—and successfully integrating them into products like Anthos—will be a key pillar within the Linux Foundation Networking.”

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • dnsZoneEntry: field should be removed when DD is retired

    When Debian Developer had retired, actual DNS entry is removed, but dnsZoneEntry: field is kept on LDAP (db.debian.org)

    So you can not reuse *.debian.net if retired Debian Developer owns your prefered subdomain already.

  • Canonical have announced a new point release for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS - 16.04.7 (Xenial Xerus)

    Canonical have released the sixth point release of Ubuntu 16.04 Long-Term Support (LTS) as Ubuntu 16.04.7.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 650

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 650 for the week of September 20 – 26, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Canonical at OSM Hackfest MR#9

    The 12th OSM Hackfest, or OSM mid-release NINE (MR#9) Hackfest, is one for the books and Canonical happily shared the presenter floor with the rest of the Open Source MANO (OSM) community. The event spanned the whole week from September 7th to 11th, with Wednesday September 9th afternoon being used for the OSM Ecosystem day. As per the last two hackfests, the remote format allowed participation of hundreds of enthusiasts. During the preparation of the hackfest, it was agreed to keep the same theme as the last one, so participants were able to use OSM to manage and orchestrate workloads in an end-to-end open source mobile network solution with the Facebook Connectivity project; Magma.

    [...]

    David Garcia, the N2VC MDL, had multiple sessions during day 2; an introduction to OSM primitives, Juju relations and a 3 hour workshop on OSM orchestration of VNFs. OSM uses Juju as a core component and leverages operators to drive lifecycle management, workload configuration, daily operations and integration functions. Juju is a universal operator lifecycle manager (OLM) that exposes events to the operators and enables users to deploy simple to complex models of applications declaring business intent instead of dealing with piles of configuration scripts.

    [...]

    The Ecosystem Day, an integral part of every hackfest, is for the community to learn about vendor-oriented solutions and projects. Among others, we had a demo of 5G Core network automation by OSM from Ulak Communications, we learned about vBNG orchestration using Juju by Benu networks and subscription and notification support in OSM by Tata ELXSI. We also presented a session on Charmed OSM, Canonical’s carrier-grade, hardened OSM distribution. Charmed OSM allows operators, GSIs and NEPs to move faster with NFV transformation through open-source technology and partner programmes.

Initial Fedora 32 vs. Fedora 33 Beta Benchmarks Point To Slightly Higher Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

In addition to Fedora Workstation 33 switching to Btrfs, there are a number of key components updated in Fedora 33 as well as finally enabling link-time optimizations (LTO) for package builds that make this next Fedora Linux installment quite interesting from a performance perspective. Here are some initial benchmarks of Fedora Workstation 32 against the Fedora Workstation 33 Beta on an Intel Core i9 10900K system.

Given the Fedora 33 beta release, here are our initial benchmarks of Fedora 33 that is due for its official release in late October. Over the past few days I've been testing the test compose of Fedora 33 Beta with all updates applied -- it's been quite a nice experience. There hasn't been any show-stopping bugs and all-around running nicely.

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Second Beta out for Krita 4.4.0

Filed under
KDE

Today, we’re releasing Krita 4.4.0 beta 2: we found a number of regressions and release blocking bugs.

This beta has Android builds too, since we fixed many issues with accessing files on Android: however, because we now add translations the APK files are too big for the Play Store, and you will have to download them from download.kde.org

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Fedora 33 Beta Released with Btrfs by Default, GNOME 3.38 and Linux 5.8

Filed under
Linux

Fedora 33 has been in development for the past several months, and now a beta version is ready for public testing so we can finally get a taste of the new features and improvements included in the upcoming release, which is expected later this year.

The biggest change in Fedora 33 is the fact that Btrfs is now used as default file system for all the official spins, including Fedora Workstation (GNOME), Fedora KDE, Fedora Xfce, Fedora LXQt, Fedora MATE-Compiz, Fedora Cinnamon, Fedora LXDE, and Fedora SoaS (Sugar on a Stick).

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Module and dev kit run Linux on Arria 10 FPGA SoC

Filed under
Linux

IWave’s “Arria 10 SoC SOM” and “Arria 10 SoC FPGA” dev kit run Linux 4.9.78 on Intel’s hybrid Arm/FPGA Arria 10 GX and SX SoCs along with PCIe, GbE, 10GbE SFP+, FMC, and PMOD.

Back in 2016, IWave launched an Arria 10 SoC Module featuring Intel/Altera’s Arria 10 SX SoC. Now, the company has launched a similarly 95 x 75mm Arria 10 SoC SOM, which is also referred to as the iW-RainboW-G24M. Designed for test and measurement, control and intelligence, diagnostic medical imaging, wireless infrastructure, radar, and automation applications, the module supports Linux 4.9.78 and is available with an Arria 10 SoC FPGA Development Kit (see farther below).

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

today's howtos

Python Programming

  • Teaching Comparing Strings in Python the Hard Way

    Some long-time subscribers may remember that I am teaching math to 10-18 year old students. The COVID-19 situation nearly made me quit and look for an alternative to earn my rent, but my love for the kids and teaching them was stronger. After a few months of shortage, we found ways to responsibly resume the meetings, either online or with safety measures. When schools were closed, some parents wondered what they could do to drag their offsprings away from computers; playing computer games seemed to be the new all-time favorite hobby. Of course, resistance was expected. Why not turn this interest into something useful? I didn’t expect that kids as young as eight are interested to learn how to create games. But why not? I learned from electronic magazines and books how computers, MS BASIC, and Z80 assembly worked when I was ten, and I am sure I would have been interested with eight, if my classmate had broken his leg two years earlier… But that’s not the story I want to tell.

  • This Python script mimics Babbage's Difference Engine

    After some contemplation, Charles Babbage's ghost replied, "This is all well and good, but here you only take the number of rows and give the number of marbles. With my table, I can also tell you how large a pyramid you might construct given a certain number of marbles; simply look it up in the table." Python had to agree that this was indeed the case, yet it knew that surely this must be solvable as well. With little delay, Python came back with another short script. The solution involves thinking through the math in reverse.

  • Setup and debug a Django app in PyCharm Community Edition

    Did you know that the freely available PyCharm community edition is perfectly suited for developing and debugging Django web applications? The goal of the article is to help you setup a new Django application framework in the PyCharm community edition, to the point that you can run and debug the Django application in PyCharm. We’ll also setup a virtual environment for the PyCharm project and install Django inside this virtual environment. [...] PyCharm comes in two editions: the professional edition and the community edition. The professional edition needs to be bought. In contrast, JetBrains makes the community edition free and open source. With other words, you can download the community edition for free and get started with it right away. When inspecting the differences between the PyCharm editions, you’ll notice that the PyCharm professional edition features all sort of Django specific support as you can read here. From this information you might think that you absolutely need to purchase the PyCharm professional edition, when programming and debugging Django applications. This is incorrect. You can definitely program and debug your Django application with the free PyCharm community edition. In this article, I’ll explain step-by-step how you can setup and debug a Django application in the free PyCharm community edition.

  • Using Google Login With Flask

    In this course, you’ll work through the creation of a Flask web application. Your application will allow a user to log in using their Google identity instead of creating a new account. There are tons of benefits with this method of user management. It’s going to be safer and simpler than managing the traditional username and password combinations.

  • Python Morsels: Writing a for loop

    You can use a for loop to loop over any iterable (iter-able). Anything you're able to iterate over can be looped over with a for loop.

  • Design of the Versioned HDF5 Library

    In a previous post, we introduced the Versioned HDF5 library and described some of its features. In this post, we'll go into detail on how the underlying design of the library works on a technical level. Versioned HDF5 is a library that wraps h5py and offers a versioned abstraction for HDF5 groups and datasets. Versioned HDF5 works fundamentally as a copy-on-write system. The basic idea of copy-on-write is that all data is effectively immutable in the backend. Whenever a high-level representation of data is modified, it is copied to a new location in the backend, leaving the original version intact. Any references to the original will continue to point to it.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #440 (Sept. 29, 2020)
  • Why use Python Programming for building a Healthcare Application

    Python is one of the best programming languages used across a plethora of industries. The healthcare sector is a significant benefactor of the language. With Python programming in healthcare, institutions and clinicians can deliver better patient outcomes through dynamic and scalable applications. Today, healthcare is generating tons of data from patients and facilities. By making the best use of this data, doctors can predict better treatment methods and improve the overall healthcare delivery system.

  • The Python return Statement: Usage and Best Practices

    The Python return statement is a key component of functions and methods. You can use the return statement to make your functions send Python objects back to the caller code. These objects are known as the function’s return value. You can use them to perform further computation in your programs. [...] Most programming languages allow you to assign a name to a code block that performs a concrete computation. These named code blocks can be reused quickly because you can use their name to call them from different places in your code. Programmers call these named code blocks subroutines, routines, procedures, or functions depending on the language they use. In some languages, there’s a clear difference between a routine or procedure and a function. Sometimes that difference is so strong that you need to use a specific keyword to define a procedure or subroutine and another keyword to define a function. For example the Visual Basic programming language uses Sub and Function to differentiate between the two.

  • Test and Code: 132: mocking in Python - Anna-Lena Popkes

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