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Saturday, 14 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 6:10pm
Story Debian Releases Updated Intel Microcode for Coffe Lake CPUs, Fixes Regression Rianne Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 6:00pm
Story Some fixes in Accessibility Inspector in Firefox 72 Rianne Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 5:59pm
Story Sabrent Rocket 4.0 NVMe Gen4 Linux Benchmarks Against Other SATA/NVMe SSDs Rianne Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 5:56pm
Story KDE Frameworks 5.65.0 Rianne Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 5:55pm
Story Google Now Bans Some Linux Web Browsers From Their Services Roy Schestowitz 3 14/12/2019 - 5:46pm
Story An Interview With Slax Creator Tomas Matejicek Rianne Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 5:44pm
Story Programming: Rasp Pi and Python Roy Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 5:28pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 5:24pm
Story Top 5 Lightweight Web Browsers for Linux Roy Schestowitz 14/12/2019 - 5:14pm

Debian Releases Updated Intel Microcode for Coffe Lake CPUs, Fixes Regression

Filed under
Debian

Last month on November 13th, the Debian Project shipped updated CPU microcode for various types of Intel CPUs to mitigate the TAA (TSX Asynchronous Abort) vulnerability (CVE-2019-11135). But not all Intel CPU models were covered by the update, so they released a new intel-microcode security update that addresses this flaw for Coffe Lake processors too.

"This update ships updated CPU microcode for CFL-S (Coffe Lake Desktop) models of Intel CPUs which were not yet included in the Intel microcode update released as DSA 4565-1," reads the security advisory. "We recommend that you upgrade your intel-microcode packages."

Read more

Some fixes in Accessibility Inspector in Firefox 72

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox 72, currently in beta, received some fixes to the Accessibility Inspector this week. Here they are.

The first fix is to a longer standing issue. If you opened Accessibility Inspector by right-clicking an element and choosing Inspect Accessibility Properties, keyboard focus would not land on the Inspector or Properties tree view, but in limbo somewhere on the document. You had to tab a couple of times to get focus to the correct place. Well, that will be no more. From now on, keyboard focus will land in the properties tree, so you can directly start exploring the name, role, states etc., of the element you are interested in.

Related to that, if you selected to inspect an accessibility element’s property either from the browser or DOM Inspector context menus, the selected row in the Accessible Objects tree would not always scroll to actually show the selected item. That too has been fixed.

Read more

Sabrent Rocket 4.0 NVMe Gen4 Linux Benchmarks Against Other SATA/NVMe SSDs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

When it comes to PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSDs, the drives we have been using are the Corsair Force MP600 that have been working out great for pairing with the newest AMD Ryzen systems. But a Black Friday deal had the Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe 4.0 Gen4 PCIe M.2 SSD on sale, so I decided to pick one up to see how it was performing on Ubuntu Linux. Here are benchmarks of the Sabrent Gen4 NVMe SSD, which in the 1TB capacity can be found for $150~170 USD.

The Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe 4.0 Gen4 (SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB) features Toshiba BiCS4 96L BGA132 TLC NAND flash memory, Phison PS5016-E16 flash controller, and Sabrent rates its performance for sequential reads up to 5000MB/s and sequential writes up to 4400MB/s. Obviously for hitting those peak performance figures this solid-state drive needs to be installed in a PCI Express 4.0 M.2 slot.

Read more

KDE Frameworks 5.65.0

Filed under
KDE

KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page.

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

Read more

Also: KDE Frameworks 5.65 Released With KQuickCharts For Accelerated Charts

An Interview With Slax Creator Tomas Matejicek

Filed under
Interviews
Debian

I was always in a need of some bootable operating system, which could be started on a broken computer or server to restore and backup data. I also wanted to impress my friends with a fully functional Linux desktop started from a removable media, which they can try without installing. But carrying full-sized CD was not much convenient, and floppy drives didn’t provide sufficient space. So my goal was to make a full featured Linux system, but small enough so it could fit those small 200MB mini CDs.

But since I was a beginner with Linux as well myself, I didn’t know much options to start with. All the distributions I tried at that time (Mandrake, Fedora) were too big, I didn’t know how to install minimalistic versions of them. Slackware provided very clever installer, which allowed me to select individual packages to install, so I started using Slackware as my base.

Read more

Programming: Rasp Pi and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Code the Classics on sale now

    TL;DR: we made a fully automated luxury gay space communist type-in-listing book. Buy it now and get it in time for Christmas.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccvi) stackoverflow python report
  • Annual release cycle for Python, new Python Software Foundation fellows from Africa, and more updates

    The Python Software Foundation (PSF) is a nonprofit organization behind the Python programming language. I am fortunate to be a PSF Fellow (honorable member for life,) a Python core developer, and the liaison between my company, Red Hat, and the PSF. Part of that liaison work is providing updates on what’s happening in the Python community. Here’s a look at what we have going on in December.

    Upcoming events

    A significant part of the Python community is its in-person events. These events are where users and contributors intermingle and learn together. Here are the big announcements of upcoming opportunities to connect.

    PyCon US 2020

    PyCon US is by far the largest annual Python event. The next PyCon is April 15-23, 2020, in Pittsburgh. The call for proposals is open to all until December 20, 2019. I’m planning to attend PyCon for the conference and its famous post-con sprints.

  • A Python and Preact app deployed on Heroku

    Heroku is great but it's sometimes painful when your app isn't just in one single language.

Top 5 Lightweight Web Browsers for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Web

Various Linux distributions provide a number of lightweight browsers that can easily run without eating up too much of your machine’s memory. So, without any further ado, here are Top 5 Lightweight Web Browsers that you can use on your Linux System.

Read more

Nginx/Rambler Dispute Over Code

Filed under
Development
Server
Legal
  • What’s yours is ours Rambler Group claims exclusive rights to world’s most popular web-server software, six months after it's sold to U.S. company for 670 million dollars

    On Thursday, December 12, Russian law enforcement raided the Moscow office of the IT company “Nginx,” which owns the eponymous web-server used by almost 500 million websites around the world. According to several reports, Nginx co-founders Igor Sysoev and Maxim Konovalov spent several hours in police interrogation. The search is part of a criminal case based on charges by a company tied to the Russian billionaire and Rambler Group co-owner Alexander Mamut, whose businesses believe they own the rights to the Nginx web-server because Sysoev started developing the code while working for Rambler in 2004. Meduza’s correspondent Maria Kolomychenko looks at how Sysoev and his partners spent 15 years creating the world’s most popular web-server before selling it to an American firm for $670 million, and how Rambler decided, half a year later, that it owns the technology.

  • ‘A typical racket, simple as that’ Nginx co-founder Maxim Konovalov explains Rambler's litigation against his company, which develops the world’s most popular web-server

    Russia’s IT industry is in the midst of a major conflict between businesses belonging to “Rambler Group” co-owner Alexander Mamut and the company “Nginx,” created by Igor Sysoev and his partner Maxim Konovalov. Nginx’s key product is the eponymous web-server used by more than a third of the world’s websites. Sysoev first released the software in 2004, while still an employee at Rambler, which is now claiming exclusive rights to Nginx, based on its interpretation of Russian law. The police have already joined the dispute, launching a criminal investigation and searching Nginx’s Moscow office. In an interview with Meduza, Nginx co-founder Maxim Konovalov described the police raid and explained why he thinks it took Rambler 15 years to claim ownership over the coveted web-server technology, which recently sold to the American corporation “F5 Networks” for $670 million.

New postmarketOS build infrastructure is powered by sourcehut builds

Filed under
OS
Android
Gadgets

Development effort from our end went into build.postmarketos.org (in short BPO). This is the name of both the website seen in the second screenshot, as well as the source code for the program that generates the website. Besides that, it manages the jobs that run on sourcehut builds.

BPO has 91% test coverage. A rather unusual design decision is that the website is generated as static HTML page whenever there is a change. It is not generated on demand when requested via HTTP. This seems highly appropriate though, as the content at most changes a few times per second.

We have come a long way from initially having no binary repository and expecting all developers to build everything from source at the project's public launch in May of 2017. During the following months we had an inofficial repository of binary packages for Plasma Mobile packages on postmarketOS at one point. Until we got the first official binary repository at the end of 2017. But that one had to be manually triggered and the build logs where not available online.

Now it's completely automated and transparent, and multiple developers of the core team are able to fix things if they go south. Therefore we allow more people to merge incoming patches, and it is already apparent that this has resulted in increased productivity.

Read more

7 free GIMP scripts and plug-ins for filters, brushes, textures and more

Filed under
GNU
HowTos

The free and open source photo-editing program called GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a nice alternative to the subscription-based or boxed versions of its competition (including PhotoShop). Whether you’re a beginner with GIMP or a seasoned pro, there’s lots to love.

Some of GIMP’s greatest assets are the plugins and scripts created by numerous independent programmers. At one time, there was a massive collection called the GIMP Plugin Registry, but that resource is no longer available. Consequently, you must search the Internet for GIMP plug-ins and scripts.

To start you on the right track, we’ve selected our favorite plugins and scripts for you to try, with a brief description of each, and a link to the resource location. First; however, we should explain the complicated process of how to install these treasures and where to find them on the GIMP menus.

Read more

Get started with Lumina for your Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

For a good number of years, there was a desktop operating system (OS) based on FreeBSD called PC-BSD. It was intended as an OS for general use, which was noteworthy because BSD development mostly focuses on servers. For most of its life, PC-BSD shipped with the KDE desktop by default, but the more KDE came to depend on Linux-specific technology, the more PC-BSD migrated away from it. PC-BSD became Trident, and its default desktop is Lumina, a collection of widgets written to use the same Qt toolkit that KDE is based upon, running on the Fluxbox window manager.

You may find the Lumina desktop in your Linux distribution's software repository or in BSD's ports tree. If you install Lumina and you're already running another desktop, you may find yourself with redundant applications (two PDF readers, two file managers, and so on) because Lumina includes a few integrated applications. If you just want to try the Lumina desktop, you can install a Lumina-based BSD distribution in a virtual machine, such as GNOME Boxes.

Read more

10 Best Linux Log File Management Tools

Filed under
Linux

Log file management is essential for apps, operating systems, servers, and anything software related. Realistically, there are some specific file management best practices that are fundamental, and tools which tend to make the process easier while outpacing the rest. We’ll briefly explore ten of these tools in this writing.

Linux and Unix require log management that’s as convenient as possible for best server management. Servers are the core of many businesses in terms of technology, and different businesses have different needs. From Papertrail to Lnav to LOGalyze, there are plenty of worthwhile options. Find those that best fit your business and needs of its tech personnel.

Read more

Linux-on-Jetson SDR board gets major software upgrade

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Deepwave Digital’s v0.2 release of the Ubuntu-based AirStack software for its Nvidia TX2 and Artix-7 equipped AIR-T SDR dev board adds variable sample rate, phase locking for MIMO, easier updates, and support for Jetpack 4.2.2, Docker, and the Jetson TX2i.

Philadelphia-based Deepwave Digital has released version 0.2.0 of the Ubuntu-driven stack that drives its Jetson TX2-enabled AIR-T (Artificial Intelligence Radio — Transceiver) board for software defined radio (SDR). AirStack 0.2.0 offers improved hardware support, easier upgrades, and new features like variable sample rate support. The release takes a step toward the company’s eventual goal of turning AIR-T into a field-deployable system, says Deepwave Digital.

Read more

Wine 5.0's first release candidate

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.0-rc1 is now available.
    
    This is the first release candidate for the upcoming Wine 5.0. It
    marks the beginning of the yearly code freeze period. Please give this
    release a good testing to help us make 5.0 as good as possible.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Gecko update, with support for running from a global location.
      - Unicode data updated to Unicode version 12.1.
      - Initial version of the MSADO (ActiveX Data Objects) library.
      - Update installation support in the WUSA (Windows Update Standalone) tool.
      - More progress on the kernel32/kernelbase restructuring.
      - Support for signing with ECDSA keys.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.0/wine-5.0-rc1.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.0/wine-5.0-rc1.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
    
  • Wine 5.0-RC1 Released With Unicode 12.1 Support, Initial ActiveX Data Objects Library

    Making it into Wine 5.0-rc1 is an updated Mozilla Gecko revision, Unicode 12.1 support, an initial MSADO ActiveX Data Objects library implementation, updating the installation support within the WUSA (Windows Update Standalone_ utility, continued Kernel32/Kernelbase restructuring, support for signing with ECDSA keys, and the usual variety of bug fixes.

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More in Tux Machines

Sabrent Rocket 4.0 NVMe Gen4 Linux Benchmarks Against Other SATA/NVMe SSDs

When it comes to PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSDs, the drives we have been using are the Corsair Force MP600 that have been working out great for pairing with the newest AMD Ryzen systems. But a Black Friday deal had the Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe 4.0 Gen4 PCIe M.2 SSD on sale, so I decided to pick one up to see how it was performing on Ubuntu Linux. Here are benchmarks of the Sabrent Gen4 NVMe SSD, which in the 1TB capacity can be found for $150~170 USD. The Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe 4.0 Gen4 (SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB) features Toshiba BiCS4 96L BGA132 TLC NAND flash memory, Phison PS5016-E16 flash controller, and Sabrent rates its performance for sequential reads up to 5000MB/s and sequential writes up to 4400MB/s. Obviously for hitting those peak performance figures this solid-state drive needs to be installed in a PCI Express 4.0 M.2 slot. Read more

KDE Frameworks 5.65.0

KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page. This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner. Read more Also: KDE Frameworks 5.65 Released With KQuickCharts For Accelerated Charts

An Interview With Slax Creator Tomas Matejicek

I was always in a need of some bootable operating system, which could be started on a broken computer or server to restore and backup data. I also wanted to impress my friends with a fully functional Linux desktop started from a removable media, which they can try without installing. But carrying full-sized CD was not much convenient, and floppy drives didn’t provide sufficient space. So my goal was to make a full featured Linux system, but small enough so it could fit those small 200MB mini CDs. But since I was a beginner with Linux as well myself, I didn’t know much options to start with. All the distributions I tried at that time (Mandrake, Fedora) were too big, I didn’t know how to install minimalistic versions of them. Slackware provided very clever installer, which allowed me to select individual packages to install, so I started using Slackware as my base. Read more

Programming: Rasp Pi and Python

  • Code the Classics on sale now

    TL;DR: we made a fully automated luxury gay space communist type-in-listing book. Buy it now and get it in time for Christmas.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccvi) stackoverflow python report
  • Annual release cycle for Python, new Python Software Foundation fellows from Africa, and more updates

    The Python Software Foundation (PSF) is a nonprofit organization behind the Python programming language. I am fortunate to be a PSF Fellow (honorable member for life,) a Python core developer, and the liaison between my company, Red Hat, and the PSF. Part of that liaison work is providing updates on what’s happening in the Python community. Here’s a look at what we have going on in December. Upcoming events A significant part of the Python community is its in-person events. These events are where users and contributors intermingle and learn together. Here are the big announcements of upcoming opportunities to connect. PyCon US 2020 PyCon US is by far the largest annual Python event. The next PyCon is April 15-23, 2020, in Pittsburgh. The call for proposals is open to all until December 20, 2019. I’m planning to attend PyCon for the conference and its famous post-con sprints.

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