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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CUPS 2.2.3 Adds Support for PPD Finishing Keywords, IPP Everywhere Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2017 - 11:07pm
Story Pale Moon A Lightweight, Firefox Based And Cross Platform Web Browser Mohd Sohail 29/03/2017 - 6:47pm
Story Where Ubuntu 17.04 “Zesty Zapus” Is Heading Mohd Sohail 29/03/2017 - 5:30pm
Story GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 13 Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2017 - 4:31pm
Story SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2017 - 4:24pm
Story Tizen and Android Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2017 - 3:33pm
Story Open source is mission critical for Europe’s air traffic Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2017 - 9:26am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2017 - 7:13am
Story New Emojis Come, Celtx Goes Away Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2017 - 7:13am
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2017 - 7:12am

CUPS 2.2.3 Adds Support for PPD Finishing Keywords, IPP Everywhere Improvements

Filed under
OSS

CUPS 2.2.3 is the third point release to the stable 2.2 series of the project, bringing a bunch of IPP Everywhere improvements, such as support for all print qualities and media types that a printer supports, in the print queues.

Additionally, it makes IPP Everywhere finishings support work correctly with common command-line and UI (User Interface) options, and updates the PPD generator to return helpful error messages. Support for PostScript Printer Description (PPD) finishing keywords was also introduced in this release.

Read more

Pale Moon A Lightweight, Firefox Based And Cross Platform Web Browser

Filed under
Linux

​Using browsers on a daily basis is nothing new for all us. We all have our favorite type of browsers like Chrome, Opera, Aurora and more. While as being open source mine and many Linux geek favorite browser is Mozilla Firefox. Today I will discuss one of awesome browser based on firefox named Pale Moon.

Read<br />
more

Where Ubuntu 17.04 “Zesty Zapus” Is Heading

Filed under
Linux

You may have heard that our Ubuntu has got a new update. Yes, it is true. On 2017-03-23 20:12:37 the release notes on the website of Canonical Group Ltd were uploaded informing the latest Ubuntu 17.04 codenamed “Zesty Zapus”. Let's see where Ubuntu 17.04 is heading.

Read<br />
more

GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 13

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME Project published today the preliminary release schedule for the next major version of the popular GNOME desktop environment, GNOME 3.26, whose development will start very soon.

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.26 Release Schedule Published

SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension

Filed under
Red Hat

Historically, data replication has been available only piecemeal through proprietary vendors. In a quest to remediate history, SUSE and partner LINBIT announced a solution that promises to change the economics of data replication. The two companies' collaborative effort is the headliner in the updated SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension, which now includes LINBIT's integrated geo-clustering technology.

Read more

Open source is mission critical for Europe’s air traffic

Filed under
OSS

It is entirely possible to use open source in a highly regulated environment such as air traffic control, says Dr Gerolf Ziegenhain, Head of Linux Competence & Service Centre (LCSC) in Mainz (Germany). Open source service providers can shield an organisation from the wide variety of development processes in the open source community.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • DRM display resource leasing (kernel side)

    So, you've got a fine head-mounted display and want to explore the delights of virtual reality. Right now, on Linux, that means getting the window system to cooperate because the window system is the DRM master and holds sole access to all display resources. So, you plug in your device, play with RandR to get it displaying bits from the window system and then carefully configure your VR application to use the whole monitor area and hope that the desktop will actually grant you the boon of page flipping so that you will get reasonable performance and maybe not even experience tearing. Results so far have been mixed, and depend on a lot of pieces working in ways that aren't exactly how they were designed to work.

  • GUADEC accommodation

    At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to a final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.

  • Kickstarter for Niryo One, open source 6-axis 3D printed robotic arm, doubles campaign goal

    A Kickstarter campaign for the Niryo One, an open source 3D printed 6-axis robotic arm, has more than doubled its €20,000 target after just a couple of days. The 3D printed robot is powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Robot Operating System.

  • Linux Action Show to End Eleven Year Run at LFNW

    Jupiter Broadcasting’s long-running podcast, Linux Action Show, will soon be signing off the air…er, fiber cable, for the last time. The show first streamed on June 10, 2006 and was hosted by “Linux Tycoon” Bryan Lunduke and Jupiter Broadcasting founder Chris Fisher. Lunduke left the show in 2012, replaced by Matt Hartley, who served as co-host for about three years. The show is currently hosted by Fisher and Noah Chelliah, president of Altispeed, an open source technology company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

New Emojis Come, Celtx Goes Away

Filed under
Software

Development News

Filed under
Development

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail

    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.

  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

Filed under
Server
  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post.

    Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs.

    Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:

  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”

Wine and Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • [Wine] Packaging changes

    Today we want to announce some important changes regarding the Wine Staging packages provided at repos.wine-staging.com and dl.winehq.org. We completely reworked our build system to make the packages available sooner after a release and also added some new features, like downloading old packages for Debian / Ubuntu. The complete list of changes can be found in the announcement email on the Wine mailing list.

  • Planescape: Torment Enhanced Edition Announced for PC, Mac, Linux, and Mobile
  • Podcast #6 with Ethan Lee, Porter on Fez, Transistor

    Have you ever played Fez on Linux ? Transistor ? Speed Runners ? Shenzen I/O ? Bastion ? or more recently, Owlboy ? Well if you have, you have benefited from the work of Flibitijibibo who is directly responsible for the port of such titles to your platform.

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Safety critical drawing with OpenGL SC

    Bringing software into a safety critical environment can be tricky, especially when using the complex APIs needed for modern 3D graphics. That’s what makes OpenGL SC (Safety Critical) so important: it bridges the gap between beautiful displays and functional safety, while trying to remain as close to existing embedded standards that we all know and love. OpenGL SC will only become more prevalent in embedded graphics work as industries increasingly try to merge safety conscious methodologies with user-friendly interfaces.

  • 2017 X.Org Elections Are Happening Now

    If you are a registered member of the X.Org Foundation, you have until 11 April to cast your ballot for this year's elections.

  • Keith Packard On Needed DRM Changes For VR HMDs

Docker/Containers

Filed under
Server
  • Docker at Travis

    The Travis CI service offers a free Continuous Integration (CI) service for open source projects hosted at GitHub.

  • Kubernetes 1.6: Multi-user, Multi-workloads at Scale

    In this release the community’s focus is on scale and automation, to help you deploy multiple workloads to multiple users on a cluster. We are announcing that 5,000 node clusters are supported. We moved dynamic storage provisioning to stable. Role-based access control (RBAC), kubefed, kubeadm, and several scheduling features are moving to beta. We have also added intelligent defaults throughout to enable greater automation out of the box.

  • Core OS offers Tectonic preview for Microsoft Azure

    If you recall the early days of Docker and OpenStack, it was quite a challenge to get OpenStack cloud up and running, and even when you got it running, managing it was a tricky task in its own right.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

6 Reasons Your Favorite Linux OS Is Plagued by Bugs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 6 Reasons Your Favorite Linux OS Is Plagued by Bugs

    I’ve been a long-time GNOME user, but for the past few months, I was in a loving relationship with Elementary OS. I found much to love in the minimalist Linux-based operating system, and I encouraged readers to give it a try.

    But that has changed. The number of bugs I encountered grew over time, and I’ve recently had enough. As a freelance writer, the only thing I need is a working laptop. If that’s not reliable, then I’m wasting time trying to fix the one tool my job requires.

  • Why do Linux distributions have software bugs?

    Linux is one of the best operating systems around, but no OS is perfect. All operating systems end up having bugs of one kind or another, including your favorite Linux distributions.

    A writer at MakeUseOf has listed six reasons why Linux distributions often have their share of bugs.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
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GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 13

The GNOME Project published today the preliminary release schedule for the next major version of the popular GNOME desktop environment, GNOME 3.26, whose development will start very soon. Read more Also: GNOME 3.26 Release Schedule Published

SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension

Historically, data replication has been available only piecemeal through proprietary vendors. In a quest to remediate history, SUSE and partner LINBIT announced a solution that promises to change the economics of data replication. The two companies' collaborative effort is the headliner in the updated SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension, which now includes LINBIT's integrated geo-clustering technology. Read more

Tizen and Android

Open source is mission critical for Europe’s air traffic

It is entirely possible to use open source in a highly regulated environment such as air traffic control, says Dr Gerolf Ziegenhain, Head of Linux Competence & Service Centre (LCSC) in Mainz (Germany). Open source service providers can shield an organisation from the wide variety of development processes in the open source community. Read more