Linux 3.15 Lands Some DRM Graphics Driver Fixes

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Likely most notable from this latest DRM fixes series entering the Linux kernel is the microcode fixes for some newer graphics cards, mainly fixing up the dynamic power management support for the AMD Radeon R7 260X graphics card. Besides the microcode fixes to stabilize newer GCN-era hardware, there's also some run-time power management fixes, and PLL regression fixes for the Radeon driver. Hopefully this pull will fix a Radeon DRM problem previously mentioned on Phoronix during the early Linux 3.15 benchmarking. Many more Linux 3.15 kernel benchmarks are forthcoming on Phoronix.

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AMD Is Disabling DPM Support For RV770 GPUs

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Graphics/Benchmarks

AMD's Alex Deucher sent out a patch on Friday to disable Dynamic Power Management on the RV770 by default. The DPM for the RV770 was enabled by default with the Linux 3.13 kernel and it yields better/lower power consumption while idling, better performance if the video BIOS sets lower clock speeds at boot time, and with the lower power consumption can also come lower heat output. However, some users have reported issues with RV770 GPUs in using the Linux 3.13 kernel and newer. (In my personal testing of several different RV770 GPUs, I haven't encountered any issues with Linux 3.13+.)
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Create Vector Graphics with Open Source Software

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OSS

This article identifies the finest open source vector graphics editors. Vector editors are ideal for technical illustrations, diagramming, flowcharting, artistic illustrations, promotional posters, banners, signage, logos, typography, vehicle wraps and layout. Bitmap editors are more suitable for retouching, photo processing, photorealistic illustrations, collage, and illustrations drawn by hand with a pen tablet.
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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

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HowTos

Leveraging Cloud, Open Source To Aid Embattled IT

Filed under
Server
OSS

IT executives laid out the challenges and opportunities created by cloud computing, open source, and other disruptive technologies during this week’s Red Hat summit in San Francisco.

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Please protest the "Windows 8 Campus Tour"

Filed under
GNU
Microsoft

Microsoft is running "Windows 8 Campus Tour" events at many US universities. We're inviting free software supporters, associated with the universities in question, to mount simple nondisruptive protests at these events.

[...]

It is good to make a sign, especially a tall sign that can rest on the floor leaning against a wall, but you don't need one. Use few words, and big bold letters, so it is readable from a distance.

Protesting is more fun if two or more people protest together, but one person can do it. If several want to participate, you could divide up the time -- those two people for two hours tomorrow, those two for an hour on Monday, etc.

The dates vary from university to university (see the list below), but most of the events have already started. Many end tomorrow, but that still offers time to act. Others continue through next week or even later. Some events already ended, but we deleted them from the list below.

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We still believe in Linus’ law after Heartbleed bug, says Elie Auvray of Jahia

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Today Jahia is the #1 Open Source alternative to proprietary CMS vendors for upper tier digital projects. Over the years, we’ve focused on building a content platform that delivers true technology convergence: business user and developers work in harmony to deploy digital projects (Portals, multichannel, multi site, Multilanguage corporate sites, extranets, intranets and even full digital applications) securely and seamlessly.

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For Red Hat, it's RHEL and then…?

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Red Hat

Red Hat is hosting its annual summit this week - this year in San Francisco - where the company is seemingly basking in the glory of making more than a billion dollars off a free open source project.

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OpenMandriva RC1 is released!

Filed under
MDV

This release candidate has been optimised for boot speed and you will find our latest kernel release that will ensure that you will be able to interact seamlessly with the new KDE-4.12.4 that has been included. The new kernel has the very latest scheduler as well as featuring UKSM to which one of our team have been contributing packages. UKSM is a kernel memory management tool which aims to reduce duplicate data in system memory and as a result increase the kernel responsiveness. Of particular note are some patches that partially correct a misinterpretation of the USB standard. This will improve device compatibility and ensure that device reawake properly after suspend or hibernate.

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XP shutdown: Switch to free software, say FSMI activists

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Activists of the Free Software Movement of India say you had better switch to free software that can easily substitute the proprietary, costly licences of Microsoft. “When you migrate, it involves a lot of cost on hardware upgrades and migration. Besides buying the OS copy of a higher version, users need to upgrade their hardware so that their systems can support the new OS,” Y Kiran Chandra, General Secretary of the Free Software Movement of India, told Business Line.

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Red Hat CEO Outlines Linux Growth Strategy

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Red Hat

Jim Whitehurst takes aim at Linux rivals and explains that growth is coming from new workloads, not migrations.

Red Hat is the first pure-play open-source Linux vendor to surpass $1 billion in annual revenue, and it has a solid plan to keep growing its business in the years ahead. That's the key message delivered by Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst during the company's annual Analyst Day event held on April 16.

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Or: Linux Video of the Week: Red Hat CEO Explains Why Enterprises Need Open Infrastructure

Also: Dell, Red Hat Partner on OpenStack Open Source Cloud Deployment

eBook Reader and Editing Software Calibre 1.33 Finally Gets Spell Check

Filed under
Software

Most of the Calibre updates released until now have been rather substantial, with very few exceptions. Even if the releases are on a weekly basis, the developer always finds some fixes or improvements to implement.

The last two editions have been rather interesting because they didn't just come with fixes, they also brought some new features, like OPML support for the RSS feeds.

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Ubuntu 12.04 LTS vs. 14.04 LTS Cloud Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Server
Ubuntu

These regressions are a bit frightening but we are still in the process of conducting further tests -- both bare metal and in the public clouds -- to try to figure out more closely what's going on. However, for most users I wouldn't hold off on upgrading to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS since it will ultimately be needed for the longest support within enterprise environments, for desktop users there are plenty of new features, the hardware enablement is much better on 14.04 LTS, the open-source graphics stack is much better, and there's many other non-performance advantages in using Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

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Two new features coming to Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

One of these new features added today is a way to control the volume of the Chrome OS media player with the Arrow keys. Chromebooks come with master volume keys built into the keyboard, but now this new basic feature allows you to push the up and down arrow keys to change the volume of the Chrome Media Player itself.

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Maynard: Raspberry Pi gets a Wayland desktop shell, get involved!

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

A lot of work is ongoing in Collabora to make Wayland usable on Raspberry Pi. The main bottleneck to the task is the lack of a functional Wayland shell for the Pi. Or at least it was till now. Marco Barisione announced Maynard, Raspberry Pi’s own Wayland shell, in his blog.

The foundation of the new shell is Tiago Vignatti‘s gtk-shell which is extended to implement Maynard. It’s still a work in progress but the initial looks are stunning. The current course is a tiled approach as you can see from the image below.

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How to Install and Try Linux the Absolutely Easiest and Safest Way

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I chose Xubuntu because it is part of the excellent and popular Ubuntu family of Linux distributions. The 12.04 LTS (long-term support) release, codename Precise Pangolin, receives updates and security fixes until April 2017. The interim releases are supported only for 9-18 months. It's nice and lightweight for older computers, and it has a good straightforward user interface. The Ubuntu installer is the easiest and most streamlined of any distro, and Ubuntu updates and upgrades are reliable. Ubuntu is popular and has the backing of its parent company Canonical, so it's not likely to disappear anytime soon. Xubuntu doesn't look much like Windows XP, but it has the same basic layout: an applications menu, and a panel that shows notifications and open apps. You can find everything with just a little bit of poking around and clicking stuff.

I know, my fellow Linux fans, I know, what about Linux Mint? Mint is a wonderful distro. And so is Mageia, and Fedora, and PCLinuxOS, and openSUSE, and Bohdi, and so many more. Linux is a feast of riches. OSDisc.com offers many Linux distros on USB sticks, so feel free to go nuts and use whatever one you want.

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OpenSSL and Linux: A Tale of Two Open-Source Projects

Filed under
Linux
Security

Linux, arguably the world’s most emblematic open-source project, provides a counterpoint to OpenSSL’s problems. Volunteers all over the world submit seven changes to Linux every hour, and millions of lines of code improvements and fixes are voluntarily added to the software every year. Over 180 major companies, including Hewlett-Packard, Oracle, IBM and Samsung, every year contribute around half a million dollars to the Linux Foundation, the nonprofit that supports the Linux system.

So what explains the discrepancy between the inattention to OpenSSL and the great fortune of Linux? Good old lack of awareness, experts say.

Open-source advocates and participants say Linux has simply had the benefit of strong brand ambassadors and better name recognition than OpenSSL.

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