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Wednesday, 19 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Oracle Announces New Solaris and SAP/SUSE Explains GNU/Linux is Better Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 3:23am
Story Fedora and CentOS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 3:14am
Story Mesa 20.0 Released Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 3:09am
Story Antitrust Laws and Open Collaboration Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 3:04am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 2:59am
Story Events: SUSECON, OpenShift Troubleshooting Workshop and Kubernetes Contributor Summit Amsterdam Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 2:54am
Story Security: Patches, Bugs, RMS Talk and NG Firewall 15.0 Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 2:51am
Story Mozilla: EU Policy, Localisation and More Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 2:39am
Story Unsigned Firmware Puts Windows, Linux Peripherals at Risk Rianne Schestowitz 1 20/02/2020 - 2:21am
Story Python Programming Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2020 - 2:13am

Oracle Announces New Solaris and SAP/SUSE Explains GNU/Linux is Better

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
  • Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU18

    Today we are releasing SRU 18 for Oracle Solaris 11.4. It is available via 'pkg update' from the support repository or by downloading the SRU from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2433412.1.

  • Oracle Ships Solaris 11.4 SRU18 - Finally Mitigates The SWAPGS Vulnerability

    Oracle today has released Solaris 11.4 SRU18 as the newest version of the long-running Solaris 11.4 series.

    There still doesn't appear to be anything active past Solaris 11.4 but Oracle does continue providing routine maintenance updates for Oracle Solaris customers. Solaris 11.4 has been out for a year and a half and is now to its eighteenth stable release update.

  • Linux And High Availability Go Hand In Hand

    If SAP infrastructures or their components malfunction or stop working altogether, SAP-supported processes are also at risk. A comprehensive Linux package includes a High Availability functionality.

    SAP core infrastructure components like servers (including VMs, storage, databases, and operating systems like Linux) or networks have a high level of technological maturity and take care of SAP-related tasks. It sometimes does happen that the IT department has to step in if business-critical applications like S/4 malfunction or stop working altogether because of faulty SAP infrastructure components.

Fedora and CentOS Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • GNU Linux Distributions – about Fedora -> CentOS -> RedHat

    The focus of the Governing Board is to assist and guide in the progress and development of the various SIGs, as well as to lead and promote CentOS.

    The CentOS Governing Board is the governing body responsible for the overall oversight of the CentOS Project and SIGs, the creation of new SIGs, and the election (and re-election) of new board members. The Board also has the responsibility to ensure the goals, brands, and marks of the CentOS Project and community are protected. The Board serves as the final authority within the CentOS Project.

  • Stories from the amazing world of release-monitoring.org #9

    I woke up to the cold morning in my tower. The sun shone brightly on the sky, but the stone of the tower was cold as it takes some time to make it warm. Everything was already prepared for today’s journey. I sat at my table and started going through some reports from workers. I still had some time til the traveler arrived. So I started reading the reports …

  • Fedora 31 : The Fyne UI toolkit for Go programming language.
  • ABRT team: New releases

    Just prior to branching of Fedora 32, we released new versions of abrt, gnome‑abrt, abrt‑java‑connector, libreport, satyr and retrace‑server.

Mesa 20.0 Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • mesa 20.0.0
    Hi list,
    
    I'd like to announce mesa 20.0.0 as available for download immediately. I'm very
    pleased that we could get all of the issues blocking the release nailed down
    quickly and make a release on time for once!
    
    This is a .0 release, and you may want to continue to to track 19.3.x until
    20.0.1 comes out in two weeks. 19.3.5 is planned to be the final 19.3 release
    and is planned for next Wednesday.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Alyssa Rosenzweig (3):
          pan/midgard: Fix missing prefixes
          pan/midgard: Don't crash with constants on unknown ops
          pan/midgard: Use fprintf instead of printf for constants
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          st/nir: Unify inputs_read/outputs_written before serializing NIR
    
    Dylan Baker (6):
          .pick_status.json: Update to 2a98cf3b2ecea43cea148df7f77d2abadfd1c9db
          .pick_status.json: Update to 946eacbafb47c8b94d47e7c9d2a8b02fff5a22fa
          .pick_status.json: Update to bee5c9b0dc13dbae0ccf124124eaccebf7f2a435
          Docs: Add 20.0.0 release notes
          docs: Empty new_features.txt
          VERSION: bump for 20.0.0 release
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          Revert "nir: Add a couple trivial abs optimizations"
    
    Francisco Jerez (6):
          intel/fs/cse: Make HALT instruction act as CSE barrier.
          intel/fs/gen7: Fix fs_inst::flags_written() for SHADER_OPCODE_FIND_LIVE_CHANNEL.
          intel/fs: Add virtual instruction to load mask of live channels into flag register.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround unwanted SEND execution due to broken NoMask control flow.
          intel/fs/gen12: Fixup/simplify SWSB annotations of SIMD32 scratch writes.
          intel/fs/gen12: Workaround data coherency issues due to broken NoMask control flow.
    
    Krzysztof Raszkowski (1):
          gallium/swr: simplify environmental variabled expansion code
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: don't wait for shader compilation to finish when destroying a context
    
    Mathias Fröhlich (1):
          egl: Implement getImage/putImage on pbuffer swrast.
    
    Peng Huang (1):
          radeonsi: make si_fence_server_signal flush pipe without work
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (1):
          radeonsi/ngg: add VGT_FLUSH when enabling fast launch
    
    Tapani Pälli (2):
          glsl: fix a memory leak with resource_set
          iris: fix aux buf map failure in 32bits app on Android
    
    Thong Thai (1):
          Revert "st/va: Convert interlaced NV12 to progressive"
    
    Timothy Arceri (1):
          glsl: fix gl_nir_set_uniform_initializers() for image arrays
    
    luc (1):
          zink: confused compilation macro usage for zink in target helpers.
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-20.0.0
    
  • Mesa 20.0 Released With Big Improvements For Intel, AMD Radeon Vulkan/OpenGL

    The Mesa 20.0 release switches to the new Intel OpenGL driver default, Vulkan 1.2 support for both AMD Radeon and Intel drivers, the RadeonSI OpenGL driver now has GL 4.6 compliance as part of switching to NIR, the Valve-backed ACO code-path for RADV is in much better shape, and many other improvements. See our Mesa 20.0 feature overview to learn about this big update.

  • Mesa 20.0 Is Imminent With New Intel OpenGL Default, Intel + RADV Vulkan 1.2, OpenGL 4.6 For RadeonSI

    With the release of Mesa 20.0 being imminent, here is a look at all of the new features for this first quarter update to the Mesa 3D stack for open-source OpenGL/Vulkan drivers.
    Highlights of the soon-to-be-out Mesa 20.0 are outlined below. Mesa 20.0 will be out as soon as today / this week unless delays happen over lingering bugs.
    - This is the first Mesa release where for those with Broadwell (Gen8) Intel graphics or newer the Intel Gallium3D driver is the new default for OpenGL support. This Intel Gallium3D driver is faster and in better shape than the i965 classic driver. That older OpenGL driver will stick around for supporting Haswell graphics and prior generations.

  • RADV Driver Adds VK_EXT_line_rasterization In Preparing For Eventual Vulkan CAD Apps

    Added to the Vulkan API last summer was VK_EXT_line_rasterization for line rasterization like employed by CAD applications. The open-source Mesa Radeon Vulkan "RADV" driver is now supporting this extension.

Antitrust Laws and Open Collaboration

Filed under
OSS
Legal

If you participate in standards development organizations, open source foundations, trade associations, or the like (Organizations), you already know that you’re required to comply with antitrust laws. The risks of noncompliance are not theoretical – violations can result in severe criminal and civil penalties, both for your organization and the individuals involved. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has in fact opened investigations into several standards organizations in recent years.

Maybe you’ve had a training session at your company, or at least are aware that there’s an antitrust policy you’re supposed to read and comply with. But what if you’re a working group chair, or even an executive director, and therefore responsible for actually making sure nothing happens that’s not supposed to? Beyond paying attention, posting or reviewing an antitrust statement at meetings, and perhaps calling your attorney when member discussions drift into grey zones, what do you actually do to keep antitrust risk in check?

Well, the good news is that regulators recognize that standards and other collaboration deliverables are good for consumers. The challenge is knowing where the boundaries of appropriate conduct can be found, whether you’re hosting, leading or just participating in activity involving competitors. Once you know the rules, you can forge ahead, expecting to navigate those risks, and knowing the benefits of collaboration can be powerful and procompetitive.

We don’t often get glimpses into the specific criteria regulators use to evaluate potential antitrust violations, particularly as applicable to collaborative organizations. But when we do, it can help consortia and other collaborative foundations focus their efforts and take concrete steps to ensure compliance.

In July 2019, the DOJ Antitrust Division (Division) provided a new glimpse, in its Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs in Criminal Antitrust Investigations (Guidance). Although the Guidance is specifically intended to assist Division prosecutors evaluating corporate compliance programs when charging and sentencing, it provides valuable insights for building or improving an Organization’s antitrust compliance program (Program).

At a high level, the Guidance suggests that an effective Program will be one that is well designed, is applied earnestly and in good faith by management, and includes adequate procedures to maximize effectiveness through efficiency, leadership, training, education, information and due diligence. This is important because organizations that detect violations and self-report to the Division’s Corporate Leniency program may receive credit (e.g. lower charges or penalties) for having an effective antitrust compliance program in place.

Read more

Events: SUSECON, OpenShift Troubleshooting Workshop and Kubernetes Contributor Summit Amsterdam

Filed under
OSS
  • Get Expert Guided Hands-On Experience at the SUSECON 2020 Pre-Conference Workshops

    Are you ready for SUSECON 2020? It’s coming up fast! Join us in Dublin Ireland from March 23 – 27 for a week packed with learning and networking.

  • Get Certified During SUSECON 2020

    Working in IT is not for the feint of heart; the work is demanding, and change is constant. Right now, your organization is undoubtedly seeking new ways to extend the value of their investment in IT and get more done faster.

  • The OpenShift Troubleshooting Workshop

    The first workshop in our Customer Empathy Workshop series was held October 28, 2019 during the AI/ML (Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning) OpenShift Commons event in San Francisco. We collaborated with 5 Red Hat OpenShift customers for 2 hours on the topic of troubleshooting. We learned about the challenges faced by operations and development teams in the field and together brainstormed ways to reduce blockers and increase efficiency for users.

    The open source spirit was very much alive in this workshop. We came together with customers to work as a team so that we can better understand their unique challenges with troubleshooting. Here are some highlights from the experience.

  • [Kubernetes] Contributor Summit Amsterdam Schedule Announced

Security: Patches, Bugs, RMS Talk and NG Firewall 15.0

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox, java-1.7.0-openjdk, ksh, and sudo), Debian (php7.0 and python-django), Fedora (cacti, cacti-spine, mbedtls, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium, re2), Oracle (firefox, java-1.7.0-openjdk, and sudo), Red Hat (openjpeg2 and sudo), Scientific Linux (java-1.7.0-openjdk and sudo), SUSE (dbus-1, dpdk, enigmail, fontforge, gcc9, ImageMagick, ipmitool, php72, sudo, and wicked), and Ubuntu (clamav, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-4.15, linux-hwe, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-aws-5.0, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-5.0, linux-oracle-5.0, linux-azure, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-raspi2-5.3, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, and qemu).

  • Certificate validity and a y2k20 bug

    One of the standard fields of an SSL certificate is the validity period. This field includes notBefore and notAfter dates which, according to RFC5280 section 4.1.2.5, indicates the interval "during which the CA warrants that it will maintain information about the status of the certificate"

    This is one of the fields that should be inspected when accepting new or unknown certificates.

    When creating certificates, there are a number of theories on how long to set that period of validity. A short period reduces risk if a private key is compromised. The certificate expires soon after and can no longer be used. On the other hand, if the keys are well protected, then there is a need to regularly renew those short-lived certificates.

  • Free Software is protecting your data – 2014 TEDx Richard Stallman Free Software Windows and the NSA

    Libre booted (BIOS with Linux overwritten) Thinkpad T400s running Trisquel GNU/Linux OS. (src: https://stallman.org/stallman-computing.html)

    LibreBooting the BIOS?

    Yes!

    It is possible to overwrite the BIOS of some Lenovo laptops (why only some?) with a minimal version of Linux.

  • NG Firewall 15.0 is here with better protection for SMB assets

    Here comes the release of NG Firewall 15.0 by Untangle with the creators claiming top-notch security for SMB assets. Let’s thoroughly discuss the latest NG Firewall update.

    With that being said, it only makes sense to first introduce this software to the readers who aren’t familiar with it. As the name ‘NG Firewall’ suggests, it is indeed a firewall but a very powerful one. It is a Debian-based and network gateway designed for small to medium-sized enterprises.

    If you want to be up-to-date with the latest firewall technology, your best bet would be to opt for this third-generation firewall. Another factor that distinguishes the NG Firewall from other such products in the market is that it combines network device filtering functions and traditional firewall technology.

Mozilla: EU Policy, Localisation and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
    The new EU digital strategy: A good start, but more to be done

    In a strategy and two white papers published today, the Commission has laid out its vision for the next five years of EU tech policy: achieving trust by fostering technologies working for people, a fair and competitive digital economy, and a digital and sustainable society. This vision includes big ambitions for content regulation, digital competition, artificial intelligence, and cybersecurity. Here we give some recommendations on how the Commission should take it forward.

    We welcome this vision the Commission sketches out and are eager to contribute, because the internet today is not what we want it to be. A rising tide of illegal and harmful content, the pervasiveness of the surveillance economy, and increased centralisation of market power have damaged the internet’s original vision of openness. We also believe that innovation and fundamental rights are complementary and should always go hand in hand – a vision we live out in the products we build and the projects we take on. If built on carefully, the strategy can provide a roadmap to address the many challenges we face, in a way that protects citizens’ rights and enhances internet openness.

    However, it’s essential that the EU does not repeat the mistakes of the past, and avoids misguided, heavy handed and/or one-size-fits-all regulations. The Commission should look carefully at the problems we’re trying to solve, consider all actors impacted and think innovatively about smart interventions to open up markets and protect fundamental rights. This is particularly important in the content regulation space, where the last EU mandate saw broad regulatory interventions (e.g. on copyright or terrorist content) that were crafted with only the big online platforms in mind, undermining individuals’ rights and competition. Yet, and despite such interventions, big platforms are not doing enough to tackle the spread of illegal and harmful content. To avoid such problematic outcomes, we encourage the European Commission to come up with a comprehensive framework for ensuring that tech companies really do act responsibly, with a focus on the companies’ practices and processes.

  • Karl Dubost: Week notes - 2020 w07 - worklog - flask blueprint
  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: February Edition
  • What’s happening on the SUMO Platform: Sprint updates

    So what’s going on with the SUMO platform? We’re moving forward in 2020 with new plans, new challenges and a new roadmap.

    We’re continuing this year to track all development work in 2 week sprints. You can see everything that is currently being worked on and our current sprint here (please note: this is only a project tracking board, do not use it to file bugs, bugs should continue to be filed via Bugzilla)

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Python Programming

    Python is a powerful multipurpose programming language created by Guido van Rossum.

    It has a simple and easy-to-use syntax, making it a popular first-choice programming language for beginners.

    This is a comprehensive guide that explores the reasons you should consider learning Python and the ways you can get started with Python.

  • Python 3.7.5 : The PyQtChart from python Qt5.

    The PyQtChart is a set of Python bindings for The Qt Company’s Qt Charts library and is implemented as a single module.

  • Null in Python: Understanding Python's NoneType Object

    If you have experience with other programming languages, like C or Java, then you’ve probably heard of the concept of null. Many languages use this to represent a pointer that doesn’t point to anything, to denote when a variable is empty, or to mark default parameters that you haven’t yet supplied. null is often defined to be 0 in those languages, but null in Python is different.

    Python uses the keyword None to define null objects and variables. While None does serve some of the same purposes as null in other languages, it’s another beast entirely. As the null in Python, None is not defined to be 0 or any other value. In Python, None is an object and a first-class citizen!

  • Python Bytes: #169 Jupyter Notebooks natively on your iPad
  • Test and Code: 101: Application Security - Anthony Shaw

    Anthony Shaw is doing something about it by creating an editor plugin that actually helps you write more secure application code while you are coding.

    On today's Test & Code, Anthony and I discuss his security plugin, but also application security in general, as well as other security components you need to consider.

    Security is something every team needs to think about, whether you are a single person team, a small startup, or a large corporation.

    Anthony and I also discuss where to start if it's just a few of you, or even just one of you.

  • Universal app reload with entr

    A useful feature many web frameworks have is auto-reload. Your app is running in the background, you change the code, and the app is restarted with those changes, so you can try them out immediately. What if you wanted that behavior for everything that you’re writing? And without any coding to implement it over and over in every little project?

    Then you can use entr. It’s a nice little UNIXy [1] tool. It really just does one thing - running commands when files change. And it has a simple, usable interface. You just pass it the names of the files it needs to watch, and give it the command to run.

  • Which verison of Python are you running?

    I actually want to ask you which version of Python3 are you running? Yes, it is a question I have to ask myself based on projects I am working on. I am sure there are many more people in the world who are also in the similar situation.

  • Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Moves Ahead With Python 2 Removal - But Sticks Around For Derivatives

    With Python 2 having been end-of-life since the start of the year and Ubuntu 20.04 being a long-term support release, Ubuntu developers are working hard to ensure Python 2 isn't shipped as part of this next Ubuntu LTS release.

    Indeed, the long process of working to remove Python 2 from Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is panning out at least as far as the official ISO is concerned. Among recent action has included removing the python* binary packages (the generic package names not python2-* or python3-*) and addressing packages that depended upon the unversioned python package names, scanning for any lingering Python 2 dependent binary packages, working to add a python-is-python2-but-deprecated package that will symlink /usr/bin/python to python2 for any hold-outs, and related work.

Fedora at the National Library of Technology

Filed under
Red Hat
Sci/Tech

Where do you turn when you have a fleet of public workstations to manage? If you’re the Czech National Library of Technology (NTK), you turn to Fedora. Located in Prague, the NTK is the Czech Republic’s largest science and technology library. As part of its public service mission, the NTK provides 150 workstations for public use.

In 2018, the NTK moved these workstations from Microsoft Windows to Fedora. In the press release announcing this change, Director Martin Svoboda said switching to Fedora will “reduce operating system support costs by about two-thirds.” The choice to use Fedora was easy, according to NTK Linux Engineer Miroslav Brabenec. “Our entire Linux infrastructure runs on RHEL or CentOS. So for desktop systems, Fedora was the obvious choice,” he told Fedora Magazine.

Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Designing an event-driven business process at scale: A health management example, Part 1

    The concept of a business process (BP), or workflow (WF), and the discipline and practice of business process management (BPM) have been around since the early 90s. Since then, WF/BPM tools have evolved considerably. More recently, a convergence of different tools has taken place, adding decision management (DM) and case management (CM) to the mix. The ascendance of data science, machine learning, and artificial intelligence in the last few years has further complicated the picture. The mature field of BPM has been subsumed into the hyped pseudo-novelties of digital business automation, digital reinvention, digital everything, etc., with the addition of “low code” and robotic process automation (RPA).

    A common requirement of business applications today is to be event-driven; that is, specific events should trigger a workflow or decision in real-time. This requirement leads to a fundamental problem. In realistic situations, there are many different types of events, each one requiring specific handling. An event-driven business application may have hundreds of qualitatively different workflows or processes. As new types of events arise in today’s ever-changing business conditions, new processes have to be designed and deployed as quickly as possible.

    This situation is different than the common requirement of scalability at runtime. It’s not just a problem of making an architecture scale to a large number of events per second. That problem is in many respects easy to solve. The problem of scalability at design time is what I am concerned about here.

  • Satellite and Ansible Tower Integration part 2: Provisioning callbacks

    Satellite and Ansible Tower are each powerful tools, and many customers utilize both of them. It is possible to integrate these tools and in part 1 of this series we covered how to configure Ansible Tower to pull a dynamic inventory of hosts from Satellite. 

    One of Satellite’s features is the ability to provision new hosts, while one of Ansible Tower’s main features is the ability to configure hosts. By integrating these tools, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) hosts provisioned by Satellite can be configured to automatically make a provisioning callback to Ansible Tower. This provisioning callback functionality allows you to run an Ansible playbook on the new RHEL host so it can be configured using the Ansible Tower infrastructure. The end result is the ability to go into Satellite, provision a new host, and automatically obtain a configured host via Ansible Tower. This can save system administrators time and allow them to meet the needs of their organization. 

    One of the prerequisites for setting up provisioning callbacks is having Satellite configured as a dynamic inventory source within Ansible Tower so, if you haven't already, first follow the steps outlined in the previous blog post. 

  • Red Hat Volleys New Patches For Exposing More File-System Info + Mount Notifications

    Longtime Linux kernel developer David Howells of Red Hat sent out his latest patch revision exposing new capabilities for exposing more VFS and mount information to user-space along with notification support for any file-system mount topology changes. 

    One part of the patch series is the fsinfo() system call for exposing more VFS / file-system information for a particular path/mount point. This system call could expose information like file-system UUIDs, capabilities of the file-system, mount attributes, and other data. 

  • Red Hat’s Susan James: How Open Source is Shaping 5G

    Open source has been shaping the way service providers collaborate and work together, especially as globalization and 5G’s huge networks demand interoperability. After 27 years at Ericsson working with enterprise, wireline, network, and cloud organizations, telecom veteran Susan James has stepped into the role of senior director of telecommunications strategy at Red Hat. She shared her thoughts with SDxCentral on how open source is transforming the service provider ecosystem.

  • Modernize your Java apps with open source, cloud-native tools

    It’s no secret that Java developers are thinking about how they’re going to modernize their existing applications to adapt to the new cloud landscape. The schedule for this week’s DevNexus conference is dominated by talks on containers, microservices, Kubernetes, and other cloud-native technologies, telling us that you’re eager to understand the best way to easily, securely move to the cloud with Java.

    In this blog post, we explore what you need to consider for building cloud-native Java applications and how open source technologies are your best bet for moving to microservices, containers, and the cloud.

  • IBM puts Power Systems in SAP’s cloud

    SAP is now hosting IBM’s latest Power Systems servers in its own data centers, as part of its HANA Enterprise Cloud managed offering. The move introduces a new hosting option for enterprises running modern ERP systems with large databases on the Power platform.

    That could interest a lot of CIOs: SAP has offered its software on the Power platform since 2005, and ported HANA to the Power architecture in 2015. IBM estimated last year that between 20 percent and 25 percent of HANA workloads then ran on Power, with the rest on servers based on Intel’s architecture.

  • The only option brought me to success installing telegram-desktop on CentOS 8.1 appears to be snap

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: Q4OS, Full Circle Weekly News, Linux Headlines and mintCast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Q4OS 4.0 Testing Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Q4OS 4.0 Testing.

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #164

    Zorin Announces Zorin Grid
    https://zoringroup.com/blog/2020/01/16/introducing-zorin-grid-manage-all-of-your-organizations-computers-as-easily-as-one/
    Xfce 4.16 Getting a Major UI Change
    https://simon.shimmerproject.org/2020/01/14/xfce-4-14-maintenance-and-4-15-updates/
    Mozilla Lays Off About 70 Employees
    https://techcrunch.com/2020/01/15/mozilla-lays-off-70-as-it-waits-for-subscription-products-to-generate-revenue/
    Ubuntu Theme Development for 20.04
    https://ubuntu.com/blog/new-ubuntu-theme-in-development-for-20-04
    Fedora CoreOS Out of Preview
    https://fedoramagazine.org/fedora-coreos-out-of-preview/
    PinePhone Braveheart Edition Ships
    https://www.pine64.org/2020/01/15/pinephones-start-shipping-all-you-want-to-know/
    Linus Torvalds Releases Linux Kernel 5.5 rc7
    https://lkml.org/lkml/2020/1/19/237
    GNU Guile 3.0.0 Released
    https://www.gnu.org/software/guile/news/gnu-guile-300-released.html
    Linux Lite 4.8 Released
    https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/release-announcements/linux-lite-4-8-final-released/
    CentOS 8.1 Released
    https://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOS8.1911
    Mir 1.7 Released
    https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/mir-1-7-0-release/14048

  • 2020-02-19 | Linux Headlines

    The Core Infrastructure Initiative has published its second major report, a DRM-free Linux game store shoots for the stars, and the clock is ticking for the GNU maintainers.

  • mintCast 328.5 – Everything Is a File

    Join us in our Innards section where we talk Linux and hardware guts.

KDE: Report on KDE India Conference 2020, Season of KDE and Tabs Overload

Filed under
KDE
  • conf.kde.in 2020 :: Late Report

    So we recently held KDE India Conference 2020 in the college where I’m pursuing my B.Tech (CSE) in New Delhi. The conference was held from 17 January 2020 to 19 January 2020.

    Photographs from the conference are available here: https://share.kde.org/s/tt6YWaDp36ni2si

    Tweets from the conference used #cki2020 tag and are available conveniently through this link: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23cki2020

    Day 1 of the conference talked about Open Source, and some of the cool KDE software that has eased many lives across the globe.

    Day 2 of the conference talked about KDE software in general and bits about QML.

    Day 3 of the conference talked about how specific KDE software and Qt Framework helps developers achieve amazing results with minimal hard-work and maximum smart-work.

  • Season of KDE Final Report

    SoK ended finally on 17th February 2020. I am happy to share that I have completed the project "Add multiple datasets to several activities" and passed the final evaluation!!!
    As I have written a post a few days back to update about my work which you can find over here.

  • Will Stephenson: It is time for a war on tabs

    All this causes additional cognitive load/dissonance when using your computing device.

    I'm not saying Plasma needs to become a tabbed window manager, but we can do better, and it is definitely time to declare war on the mess above.

Cast To TV v12 Chromecast Extension For GNOME Shell Adds Automatic Image Slideshow, Audio Only Transcoding, More

Filed under
GNOME

Cast to TV, a GNOME Shell extension to cast media (with optional transcoding) to Chromecast and other devices over the local network, has been updated to version 12. In this release, the extension has received an option for audio only transcoding, automatic image slideshow, support for casting files from network GVFS mounts, and much more.

Cast to TV is a very capable and feature-packed GNOME Shell extension for casting videos, music and pictures to Chromecast (and other devices) on the local network. It features on-the-fly transcoding for video or audio files that aren't directly supported by the Chromecast (with hardware-accelerated encoding using VA-API or NVENC), customizable subtitles, music visualizer, an optional remote control applet (with playlist support) displayed on GNOME Shell's top bar, and more.

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Unsigned Firmware Puts Windows, Linux Peripherals at Risk

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Security

Researchers at firmware security company Eclypsium on Tuesday released new research that identifies and confirms unsigned firmware in WiFi adapters, USB hubs, trackpads and cameras used in Windows and Linux computer and server products from Lenovo, Dell, HP and other major manufacturers.

Eclypsium also demonstrated a successful attack on a server via a network interface card with unsigned firmware used by each of the big three server manufacturers.

The demonstration shows the exposed attack vector once firmware on any of these components is infected using the issues the report describes. The malware stays undetected by any software security controls.

Unsigned firmware provides multiple pathways for malicious actors to compromise laptops and servers. That leaves millions of Windows and Linux systems at risk of firmware attacks that can exfiltrate data, disrupt operations and deliver ransomware, warned Eclypsium.

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Stable Kernels: 5.5.5, 5.4.21, and 4.19.105

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Linux
  • Linux 5.5.5

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.5.5 kernel.

    All users of the 5.5 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.5.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.5.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.4.21
  • Linux 4.19.105

A New Linux-Exclusive Gaming Platform Is Coming: Meet GamePad

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Linux
Gaming

Linux is not a player-friendly platform and is generally not preferred for gaming. Still, Linux community developers do a good job by providing support for graphics drivers and new games to provide a better gaming experience. Better still, a Linux-specific gaming platform is on the way.

GamePad started Kickstarter campaign as a completely Linux-specific game platform. The platform was inspired by the digital distribution platform GOG (Good Old Games) for video games and movies. GamePad is designed as a free and open source platform. So developers will be able to change the source code to add new features to the platform and customize it to create their own clients for any Linux distribution.

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Learn the main Linux OS components

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OS
Linux

Evolved from Unix, Linux provides users with a low-cost, secure way to manage their data center infrastructure. Due to its open source architecture, Linux can be tricky to learn and requires command-line interface knowledge as well as the expectation of inconsistent documentation.

In short, Linux is an OS. But Linux has some features and licensing options that set it apart from Microsoft and Apple OSes. To understand what Linux can do, it helps to understand the different Linux OS components and associated lingo.

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Antitrust Laws and Open Collaboration

If you participate in standards development organizations, open source foundations, trade associations, or the like (Organizations), you already know that you’re required to comply with antitrust laws. The risks of noncompliance are not theoretical – violations can result in severe criminal and civil penalties, both for your organization and the individuals involved. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has in fact opened investigations into several standards organizations in recent years. Maybe you’ve had a training session at your company, or at least are aware that there’s an antitrust policy you’re supposed to read and comply with. But what if you’re a working group chair, or even an executive director, and therefore responsible for actually making sure nothing happens that’s not supposed to? Beyond paying attention, posting or reviewing an antitrust statement at meetings, and perhaps calling your attorney when member discussions drift into grey zones, what do you actually do to keep antitrust risk in check? Well, the good news is that regulators recognize that standards and other collaboration deliverables are good for consumers. The challenge is knowing where the boundaries of appropriate conduct can be found, whether you’re hosting, leading or just participating in activity involving competitors. Once you know the rules, you can forge ahead, expecting to navigate those risks, and knowing the benefits of collaboration can be powerful and procompetitive. We don’t often get glimpses into the specific criteria regulators use to evaluate potential antitrust violations, particularly as applicable to collaborative organizations. But when we do, it can help consortia and other collaborative foundations focus their efforts and take concrete steps to ensure compliance. In July 2019, the DOJ Antitrust Division (Division) provided a new glimpse, in its Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs in Criminal Antitrust Investigations (Guidance). Although the Guidance is specifically intended to assist Division prosecutors evaluating corporate compliance programs when charging and sentencing, it provides valuable insights for building or improving an Organization’s antitrust compliance program (Program). At a high level, the Guidance suggests that an effective Program will be one that is well designed, is applied earnestly and in good faith by management, and includes adequate procedures to maximize effectiveness through efficiency, leadership, training, education, information and due diligence. This is important because organizations that detect violations and self-report to the Division’s Corporate Leniency program may receive credit (e.g. lower charges or penalties) for having an effective antitrust compliance program in place. Read more

today's howtos

Events: SUSECON, OpenShift Troubleshooting Workshop and Kubernetes Contributor Summit Amsterdam

  • Get Expert Guided Hands-On Experience at the SUSECON 2020 Pre-Conference Workshops

    Are you ready for SUSECON 2020? It’s coming up fast! Join us in Dublin Ireland from March 23 – 27 for a week packed with learning and networking.

  • Get Certified During SUSECON 2020

    Working in IT is not for the feint of heart; the work is demanding, and change is constant. Right now, your organization is undoubtedly seeking new ways to extend the value of their investment in IT and get more done faster.

  • The OpenShift Troubleshooting Workshop

    The first workshop in our Customer Empathy Workshop series was held October 28, 2019 during the AI/ML (Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning) OpenShift Commons event in San Francisco. We collaborated with 5 Red Hat OpenShift customers for 2 hours on the topic of troubleshooting. We learned about the challenges faced by operations and development teams in the field and together brainstormed ways to reduce blockers and increase efficiency for users. The open source spirit was very much alive in this workshop. We came together with customers to work as a team so that we can better understand their unique challenges with troubleshooting. Here are some highlights from the experience.

  • [Kubernetes] Contributor Summit Amsterdam Schedule Announced

Security: Patches, Bugs, RMS Talk and NG Firewall 15.0

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox, java-1.7.0-openjdk, ksh, and sudo), Debian (php7.0 and python-django), Fedora (cacti, cacti-spine, mbedtls, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium, re2), Oracle (firefox, java-1.7.0-openjdk, and sudo), Red Hat (openjpeg2 and sudo), Scientific Linux (java-1.7.0-openjdk and sudo), SUSE (dbus-1, dpdk, enigmail, fontforge, gcc9, ImageMagick, ipmitool, php72, sudo, and wicked), and Ubuntu (clamav, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-4.15, linux-hwe, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-aws-5.0, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-5.0, linux-oracle-5.0, linux-azure, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-raspi2-5.3, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, and qemu).

  • Certificate validity and a y2k20 bug

    One of the standard fields of an SSL certificate is the validity period. This field includes notBefore and notAfter dates which, according to RFC5280 section 4.1.2.5, indicates the interval "during which the CA warrants that it will maintain information about the status of the certificate" This is one of the fields that should be inspected when accepting new or unknown certificates. When creating certificates, there are a number of theories on how long to set that period of validity. A short period reduces risk if a private key is compromised. The certificate expires soon after and can no longer be used. On the other hand, if the keys are well protected, then there is a need to regularly renew those short-lived certificates.

  • Free Software is protecting your data – 2014 TEDx Richard Stallman Free Software Windows and the NSA

    Libre booted (BIOS with Linux overwritten) Thinkpad T400s running Trisquel GNU/Linux OS. (src: https://stallman.org/stallman-computing.html) LibreBooting the BIOS? Yes! It is possible to overwrite the BIOS of some Lenovo laptops (why only some?) with a minimal version of Linux.

  • NG Firewall 15.0 is here with better protection for SMB assets

    Here comes the release of NG Firewall 15.0 by Untangle with the creators claiming top-notch security for SMB assets. Let’s thoroughly discuss the latest NG Firewall update. With that being said, it only makes sense to first introduce this software to the readers who aren’t familiar with it. As the name ‘NG Firewall’ suggests, it is indeed a firewall but a very powerful one. It is a Debian-based and network gateway designed for small to medium-sized enterprises. If you want to be up-to-date with the latest firewall technology, your best bet would be to opt for this third-generation firewall. Another factor that distinguishes the NG Firewall from other such products in the market is that it combines network device filtering functions and traditional firewall technology.