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Sunday, 20 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 1 20/05/2018 - 8:59pm
Story Introduction To VPS Or Virtual Private Server Mohd Sohail 20/05/2018 - 8:31pm
Story Raspberry Pi Series Part 4: Ten Raspberry Pi Linux Distributions To Get You Going In 2018 Mohd Sohail 20/05/2018 - 6:38pm
Story Plasma 5.12.5, Applications 18.04.1 and Frameworks 5.46.0 by KDE now available in Chakra Roy Schestowitz 1 20/05/2018 - 2:04pm
Story Linux 4.16.10, 4.14.42, and 4.9.101 Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 2:03pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 12:16pm
Story Steam Controller Kernel Driver Is Landing In The Linux 4.18 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:40am
Story Video of AsteroidOS Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:38am
Story KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 11:24am
Story FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux itsfoss 20/05/2018 - 8:35am

Introduction To VPS Or Virtual Private Server

Filed under
Development

VPS or Virtual Private Server is a virtual machine that’s hosted somewhere in the world. A VPS provider divides a physical computer into multiple virtual computers and one can buy and access those virtual machines as a service. Each virtual machine runs its own operating system so you can perform […]

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Raspberry Pi Series Part 4: Ten Raspberry Pi Linux Distributions To Get You Going In 2018

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi informs you everything you need to know about the Raspberry Pi. In this article, we feature Ten Linux distributions for your Raspberry Pi in 2018. If you thought it is only Raspbian we have for Pi, take a look.

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more

Linux 4.16.10, 4.14.42, and 4.9.101

Filed under
Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ‘Crush Them’: An Oral History of the Lawsuit That Upended Silicon Valley

    The then-23-year-old giant, which ruled the personal computer market with a despotic zeal, stood accused of using monopoly power to bully collaborators and squelch competitors. Its most famous victim was Netscape, the pioneering web browser, but everyone from Apple to American Airlines felt threatened by late-’90s Microsoft. The company was big enough to be crowned America’s most valuable firm, bold enough to compare attacks on its domain to Pearl Harbor, and, eventually, bad enough to be portrayed as a (semifictionalized) cadre of hypercapitalist murderers in a major motion picture. The “don’t be evil” optics that colored the rise of today’s tech giants (and have recently lost their efficacy) were a direct response to Microsoft’s tyrannical rule.

  • Michał Górny: Empty directories, *into, dodir, keepdir and tmpfiles.d
  • FRAMED Collection, a noir-styled spy adventure where you rearrange comic tiles is now out

    It's actually a compilation of FRAMED and FRAMED 2, games that have been widely praised and previously only available on mobile platforms. It has you moving around slices of an animated comic book, to put the noir-styled spy adventure story together. It actually sounds hilarious, as it's not a basic "this one has to go here" type of game, as it changes what happens based on where you put the tiles creating some amusing sounding failures:

  • Paradox’s grand strategy titles will be getting more content soon

    At their annual convention, Paradox Interactive have announced new expansions for their current grand strategy titles. There’s a little bit of everything for fans of these games.

  • Why OpenShift Is The New OpenStack For Red Hat
  • Help the Debian kernel team to help you

    I gave the first talk this morning at Mini-DebConf Hamburg, titled "Help the kernel team to help you". I briefly described several ways that Debian users and developers can make it easier (or harder) for us to deal with their requests. The slides are up in on my talks page, and video should be available soon.

  • UbuCon Europe 2018: Analysing a dream [English|Spanish]

    The idea of organising the Ubucon in Xixon, Asturies was set two years ago, while participating in the European Ubucon in Essen (germany). The Paris Ubucon took place and in those days we uderstood that there was a group enough of people with the capacities and the will to hold an European Congress for Ubuntu lovers. We had learnt a lot from German and French colleagues thanks to their respective amazing organizations and, at the same time, our handicap was the lack of s consolidated group in Spain.

  • 19-year-old Developer at the Forefront of TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
  • 19-years-old German developer Spearheads TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp

    No doubt that Tron community is preparing for mainnet launch, with different ideas coming in from all roads. As part of its readiness, Tron has unveiled its Opensource Wallet DApp developed by 19-year old German developer, Marius Gill, who has been programming since 13 years old.

    The DApp is an outcome of Project Genesis, which was launched in March 2018 purposely to encourage TRON’s community engagement in bringing in new things into Tron ecosystem. The project provides a bonus pool of 2 billion dollars for active members around the world have lent their hands in implementing ideas for the community.

  • Collabora and GStreamer spring in Sweden

    Earlier this month, a few of us from Collabora, Olivier Crête, Nicolas Dufresne, George Kiagiadakis and I attended the GStreamer Spring Hackfest in Lund, Sweden. Hosted by Axis Communications (who uses GStreamer in their surveillance cameras for many years now), it was a great opportunity for the GStreamer community to touch base and work on open bugs and pet projects.

    [...]

    As for myself, I mainly worked on (or rather started to work on) split-field interlacing support in GStreamer, adding relevant formats and modes in the GStreamer video library. In addition, as a Meson developer (Nirbheek Chauhan) was present, I took the opportunity to discuss with him the last bit of porting build system of Geoclue to Meson, a side project I've been working on. It helped me get it done faster but also helped Nirbheek find some issues in Meson and fix them!

    All in all, my first GStreamer hackfest was an awesome experience (even though I was not feeling well). It was also very nice to hangout and socialize with old and new friends in the GStreamer community after a long time. Many thanks again to Axis for hosting us in their offices! See you at the GStreamer Conference this fall!

  • Reality Redrawn Opens At The Tech

    The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose was filled on Thursday with visitors experiencing new takes on the issue of fake news by artists using mixed reality, card games and even scratch and sniff cards. These installations were the results of Mozilla’ Reality Redrawn challenge. We launched the competition last December to make the power of misinformation and its potential impacts visible and visceral. Winners were announced in February.

  • Tangerine UI problems

    I've been a big fan of Tangerine for a while, it's a bank that doesn't charge fees and does what I need to do. They used to have a great app and website and then it all went a bit wrong.

    It's now a HTML app for Desktop and mobile. This isn't the fault of the tools used, but there's some terrible choices in the app across both.

    [...]

    The overall feel of the app is that its full of spinners, far too cluttered and just to confusing. Hey not everything I've built is perfect, but even I can spot some real problems with this app. I pretty sure Tangerine can do better than this.

    And yes, I'm writing this while drinking a beer I recently bought, as shown on my transaction page.

  • Majority of software plagued by vulnerabilities as open source adoption soars [Ed: More of Black Duck's FUD]
  • SiFive Releases 'Expansion Board' to Build Interest in RISC-V Processor
  • FreeBSD 11.2 Beta 2 Available For Testing, Brings PTI Optimization

    The second beta release of FreeBSD 11.2 is now available for weekend testing.

    FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 is now available with a variety of bug fixes, a fix to restore boot support for the Banana Pi ARM board, a context switch optimization for page table isolation (PTI), DTrace improvements, various build fixes, and a range of other system fixes.

  • Sony Is Working On AMD Ryzen LLVM Compiler Improvements - Possibly For The PlayStation 5

    One of Sony's compiler experts has taken to working on some tuning for the AMD Ryzen "znver1" microarchitecture support within the LLVM compiler stack. This begs the question why Sony is working on Ryzen improvements if not for a future product.

  • Popular YouTuber Says Apple Won't Fix His iMac Pro Damaged While Disassembled

    The damage resulted when they dropped the display while attempting to reattach it to the aluminum chassis. Towards the end of the video, Sebastian also says the iMac Pro requires a new logic board and power supply unit, suggesting there may have been a short circuit that caused damage to internal components as well.

  • Most dangerous new cyber security threats [iophk: "Windows TCO, yet neither Microsoft nor Windows get a mention"]

Steam Controller Kernel Driver Is Landing In The Linux 4.18 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

The Linux 4.18 kernel will feature the initial Steam Controller kernel driver that works without having to use the Steam client or using third-party user-space applications like the SC-Controller application.

A few months back we reported on a kernel driver being worked on for the Steam Controller by an independent user/developer outside of the gates of Valve. In part through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been working on this native Steam Controller Linux kernel driver that works for both USB cable and wireless modes of the Steam Controller and is a proper HID driver.

Read more

Video of AsteroidOS

Filed under
OS
Android
Linux

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released

Filed under
KDE

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released

We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.2.2 and 5.2.3. 5.2.2 was tagged 6 weeks ago, but we never managed to release it because we did not have the patience to fix the Windows installers in time due to a broken CI. Windows installers are provided for 5.2.3 again. We'll only provide source tarballs for 5.2.2 and we encourage everyone to just skip this release and use 5.2.3 which contains a few more bug fixes.

This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using KDevelop 5.2.1.

Read more

Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 19

FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux

Filed under
News

FreeOffice 2018 has just been released and it provides even better support for Microsoft Office documents on Linux.
Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Doxyqml 0.4.0

Filed under
KDE
Software

After almost two years, here comes a new version of Doxyqml, the QML filter for Doxygen. This new version adds a new command-line option: --namespace to wrap the generated C++ in a namespace, and makes the parser more robust. Nothing ground-breaking, but some nice changes nevertheless.

What's interesting with this project is that I don't use it these days, but it still receives contributions from time to time. This puts me in the unusual position (for me) where most of my contributions to the project are reviewing code, cleaning things, a bit of infrastructure (I just added code coverage checks: 88%, not too bad) and release management.

Surprisingly, I like doing this, I am happy to see this little tool remains useful enough that others keep it alive.

Read more

Plasma 5.12.5, Applications 18.04.1 and Frameworks 5.46.0 by KDE now available in Chakra

Filed under
KDE

On your next system upgrade you will receive all the latest versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks, in addition to several other package updates. For more details and the full changelogs on KDE’s software releases, you can read the official announcements:

Plasma 5.12.5
Applications 18.04.1
Frameworks 5.46.0

Other noteworthy package updates include wine 3.8, skypeforlinux 8.20.0.9 and pypy 6.0.0.

Read more

SMTube review - Your train to Youtube

Filed under
Software

It's a no brainer. On the desktop, you go online, and you open a tab and you load Youtube, and then you play clips. But then, on mobile devices, you have dedicated applications, which usually offer a somewhat more efficient media experience. So, on the desktop, it's the browser way or the ... SMTube way?

SMTube is a cross-platform Youtube player, which allows you to search and play videos from the popular media platform, with some additional search tweaks and filters, and extra download options, all this from the desktop, without having to keep a browser tab open. It's a convenient tool to use, and with the recent rewrite, it actually works, and it works fairly well. I decided to test to see what gives.

[...]

SMTube looks like a nice tool. It is not strictly necessary or needed, but it does allow you to have Youtube open and playing, even if you're not currently using your browser, i.e. you can use it like any other media player. This is nice, plus you get a clean and intuitive interface, decent search and filter options, and it's easy to change settings and configure additional players. You also have the option to download clips.

I don't know where SMTube stands when it comes to Google, Youtube, but ordinary users will surely appreciate the extra flexibility they get with a media player rather than just a browser tab. Of course, you're not signed in, you don't get recommendations, comments or playlists, and such, so I guess there are benefits to going directly to Youtube. But if you're only after what Youtube can play without any socializing, SMTube is an excellent choice. It's had a rough ride, it never quite fully worked for me in my various distro reviews, but this new version is stable, robust and works well. At the very least, it's worth testing. Choo choo.

Read more

GNOME Development/Developers

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Nautilus Ability To Launch Binaries Or Scripts To Be Reverted, Might Be Implemented Differently

    It looks like the decision to remove the ability to run binaries and scripts from Nautilus file manager will be reverted. The change comes after some use cases appeared that the developers agreed they need to support, "especially for enterprise and content creators".

    One such use case that was mentioned as a reason for reverting this is a small "if then that" script for building HTML and PDF files, which uses Zenity to display a dialog, as well as notifications to display the progress.

    I find the use case being used as an example a bit weird because that's certainly not something common, like a self-extracting game script for instance.

  • Stickers in Riot

    The matrix.org protocol is flexible so this is a good example of how to add new features to the clients that uses matrix without the need to change the protocol.

    This is not a core feature because you can send images, but I think this is great and add a simple way to show reactions for the users, so as I was reading I thought that we can add this to Fractal, so I started to read how we can add support for this.

  • Talking at GPN 2018 in Karlsruhe, Germany

    Similar to last year I managed to attend the Gulasch Programmier-Nacht (GPN) in Karlsruhe, Germany. Not only did I attend, I also managed to squeeze in a talk about PrivacyScore. We got the prime time slot on the opening day along with all the other relevant talks, including the Eurovision Song Contest, so we were not overly surprised that the audience had a hard time deciding where to go and eventually decided to attend talks which were not recorded. Our talk was recorded and is available here.

Debian Development/Developers

Filed under
Debian
  • Free software log (April 2018)

    This is rather late since I got distracted by various other things including, ironically, releasing a bunch of software. This is for April, so doesn't include the releases from this month.

    The main release I worked on was remctl 3.14, which fixed a security bug introduced in 3.12 with the sudo configuration option. This has since been replaced by 3.15, which has more thorough maintainer testing infrastructure to hopefully prevent this from happening again.

  • MiniDebCamp Hamburg - Friday 18/5, Saturday 19/5

    Friday and Saturday have been very productive days, I love events where there is time to hack!

    I had more chats about contributors.d.o with Ganneff and Formorer, and if all goes according to plan, soon salsa will start streaming commit information to contributors and populate information about different teams: not only about normal packaging repos, but also about websites, tools, native packages, etc.

  • Progress report from the Movim packaging sprint at MiniDebconf

    Nik wishes you to know that the Movim packaging sprint (sponsored by the DPL, thank you!) is handled under the umbrella of the Debian Edu sprint (similarily sponsored) since this package is handled by the Teckids Debian Task Force, personnel from Teckids e.V.

    After arriving, I’ve started collecting knowledge first. I reviewed upstream’s composer.json file and Wiki page about dependencies and, after it quickly became apparent that we need much more information (e.g. which versions are in sid, what the package names are, and, most importantly, recursive dependencies), a Wiki page of our own grew. Then I made a hunt for information about how to package stuff that uses PHP Composer upstream, and found the, ahem, wonderfully abundant, structured, plentiful and clear documentation from the Debian PHP/PEAR Packaging team. (Some time and reverse-engineering later I figured out that we just ignore composer and read its control file in pkg-php-tools converting dependency information to Debian package relationships. Much time later I also figured out it mangles package names in a specific way and had to rename one of the packages I created in the meantime… thankfully before having uploaded it.) Quickly, the Wiki page grew listing the package names we’re supposed to use. I created a package which I could use as template for all others later.

  • RcppGSL 0.3.5

    A maintenance update of RcppGSL just brought version 0.3.5 to CRAN, a mere twelve days after the RcppGSL 0.3.4. release. Just like yesterday's upload of inline 0.3.15 it was prompted by a CRAN request to update the per-package manual page; see the inline post for details.

Linux Graphics: AMD and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Zen CPU Microcode Added To Linux-Firmware Tree, Bulldozer Updated

    When the Linux Firmware tree was updated on Friday with the newest AMDGPU firmware files for the graphics processors, the Family 17h "Zen" CPU microcode files also made their debut.

  • Learn How To Make Use Of Vulkan's New Debug Extension - VK_EXT_debug_utils
  • ARM Mali 400/450 "Lima" DRM Driver Steps Closer To Mainline

    When it comes to open-source ARM Mali graphics driver efforts there has been the Panfrost driver targeting the Mali T700 series that has occupied much of the limelight recently, but there has been a separate effort still working on open-source driver support for the older 400/450 series.

    Qiang Yu who works for AMD during the daytime has for the past number of months been working in his spare time on reviving open-source ARM Mali 400 series support. Qiang's efforts are based upon the original "Lima" driver initiative that was started years earlier by Luc Verhaegen.

  • AMD Rolls Out New Firmware For A Number Of GPUs

    AMD has landed a number of updated firmware images into the linux-firmware tree for their recent generations of hardware.

    There is updated Radeon GPU firmware for Raven Ridge, Fiji, Tonga, Stoney, Topaz, Carrizo, Vega 10, Polaris 10, Polaris 11, and Polaris 12 GPU families. More or less, the newer AMD GPUs now have updated firmware available.

  • RADV Gets Support For 32-bit GPU Pointers For User SGPRs, Benefiting Performance

    Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's Linux graphics driver team has been working on support for 32-bit GPU pointers for user SGPRs as his latest performance enhancement for this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver.

    Months after AMD's Marek Olšák was working on 32-bit pointers for RadeonSI to free up some scalar general purpose registers (SGPRs), Pitoiset has been pursuing similar support for the RADV Vulkan driver.

  • Raven Ridge With The Ryzen 5 2400G On Mesa 18.2 + Linux 4.17 Is Finally Stable

    Depending upon the motherboard and other factors, the Raven Ridge Linux support has been a bit of a mess since its February launch. Fortunately, with time various Linux driver fixes have landed for improving the stability and performance of these APUs with Zen CPU cores and Vega graphics. During my recent testing of the AMD Ryzen 5 2400G, it was completely stable and running fine with the newest open-source driver code but the Ryzen 3 2200G was still a stability nightmare.

  • Mesa 18.1 is out with the shader cache on for Intel

    Open source drivers on Linux have advanced rather quickly and now we have another fresh release out with Mesa 18.1 which was released yesterday.

    One of the major new features, is that the shader cache for Intel is now turned on by default, which should hopefully result in smoother performance for those of you gaming with an Intel GPU. Vulkan 1.1 support for the AMD RADV and Intel ANV drivers, plus various performance improvements and bug fixes.

FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 Now Available, DragonFly BSD 5.2.1

Filed under
BSD

Congratulations to Tesla on Their First Public Step Toward GPL Compliance

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Congratulations to Tesla on Their First Public Step Toward GPL Compliance

    Conservancy rarely talks publicly about specifics in its ongoing GNU General Public License (GPL) enforcement and compliance activity, in accordance with our Principles of Community Oriented GPL Enforcement. We usually keep our compliance matters confidential — not for our own sake — but for the sake of violators who request discretion to fix their mistakes without fear of public reprisal. As occurred a few years ago with Samsung, we're thrilled when a GPL violator decides to talk about their violation and works to correct it publicly. This gives us the opportunity to shine light on the real-world work of GPL and copyleft compliance.

    We're thus glad that, this week, Tesla has acted publicly regarding its current GPL violations and has announced that they've taken their first steps toward compliance. While Tesla acknowledges that they still have more work to do, their recent actions show progress toward compliance and a commitment to getting all the way there.

  • Tesla releases some of its software to comply with open source licences

    Tesla is a software-heavy company and it has been using a lot of open source software to build its operating system and features, such as Linux Kernel, Buildroot, Busybox, QT, and more.

    Some of the copyright holders have been complaining that Tesla hasn’t been complying with their licenses.

  • The Software Freedom Conservancy on Tesla's GPL compliance

    The Software Freedom Conservancy has put out a blog posting on the history and current status of Tesla's GPL compliance issues.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stellaris: Distant Stars story DLC pack releases May 22nd, new trailer is out

    The latest and probably one of the most exciting story DLC packs for Stellaris, Distant Stars, is now set to release May 22nd.

    In short, there's going to be a lot more to find when you go exploring. One of the problems I repeatedly talked about with Stellaris (even though I do love it) was that it just didn't have enough content. This pack seems like it will fix that problem and then some. They say there's around 50% more anomalies to discover, they've also improved some of the originals. There's three new leviathans, new types of stars and something about discovering a constellation outside our own galaxy.

  • Myst 25th Anniversary Collection will not being seeing a Linux release for now

    It seems the plans to team up with Codeweavers to bring Myst 25th Anniversary Collection [Kickstarter] to Linux didn't work out.

  • A Linux beta build of Solstice Chronicles: MIA may come soon

    The developer behind the great looking top-down shooter Solstice Chronicles: MIA [Official Site] has said that they may soon have a Linux beta build.

  • What are you playing on Linux this weekend and what do you think about it?

    It's a weekend, the sun is shining in a rare event for where I live, so naturally I will be spending my time playing Linux games. What will you be playing this weekend?

    Personally, I'm going to be jumping back into Rocket League. Between the intense gameplay and sweet music, it's certainly in my top 10 most played Linux games. As much as I love the game, I'm simply terrible at it. Anyone who's watched some of our livestreams will attest to that fact, but even so I soldier on and keep playing. It truly says something about a game, to keep pulling you back in even when you know you're probably go to have loss after loss.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • ‘Crush Them’: An Oral History of the Lawsuit That Upended Silicon Valley

    The then-23-year-old giant, which ruled the personal computer market with a despotic zeal, stood accused of using monopoly power to bully collaborators and squelch competitors. Its most famous victim was Netscape, the pioneering web browser, but everyone from Apple to American Airlines felt threatened by late-’90s Microsoft. The company was big enough to be crowned America’s most valuable firm, bold enough to compare attacks on its domain to Pearl Harbor, and, eventually, bad enough to be portrayed as a (semifictionalized) cadre of hypercapitalist murderers in a major motion picture. The “don’t be evil” optics that colored the rise of today’s tech giants (and have recently lost their efficacy) were a direct response to Microsoft’s tyrannical rule.

  • Michał Górny: Empty directories, *into, dodir, keepdir and tmpfiles.d
  • FRAMED Collection, a noir-styled spy adventure where you rearrange comic tiles is now out
    It's actually a compilation of FRAMED and FRAMED 2, games that have been widely praised and previously only available on mobile platforms. It has you moving around slices of an animated comic book, to put the noir-styled spy adventure story together. It actually sounds hilarious, as it's not a basic "this one has to go here" type of game, as it changes what happens based on where you put the tiles creating some amusing sounding failures:
  • Paradox’s grand strategy titles will be getting more content soon
    At their annual convention, Paradox Interactive have announced new expansions for their current grand strategy titles. There’s a little bit of everything for fans of these games.
  • Why OpenShift Is The New OpenStack For Red Hat
  • Help the Debian kernel team to help you
    I gave the first talk this morning at Mini-DebConf Hamburg, titled "Help the kernel team to help you". I briefly described several ways that Debian users and developers can make it easier (or harder) for us to deal with their requests. The slides are up in on my talks page, and video should be available soon.
  • UbuCon Europe 2018: Analysing a dream [English|Spanish]
    The idea of organising the Ubucon in Xixon, Asturies was set two years ago, while participating in the European Ubucon in Essen (germany). The Paris Ubucon took place and in those days we uderstood that there was a group enough of people with the capacities and the will to hold an European Congress for Ubuntu lovers. We had learnt a lot from German and French colleagues thanks to their respective amazing organizations and, at the same time, our handicap was the lack of s consolidated group in Spain.
  • 19-year-old Developer at the Forefront of TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
  • 19-years-old German developer Spearheads TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
    No doubt that Tron community is preparing for mainnet launch, with different ideas coming in from all roads. As part of its readiness, Tron has unveiled its Opensource Wallet DApp developed by 19-year old German developer, Marius Gill, who has been programming since 13 years old. The DApp is an outcome of Project Genesis, which was launched in March 2018 purposely to encourage TRON’s community engagement in bringing in new things into Tron ecosystem. The project provides a bonus pool of 2 billion dollars for active members around the world have lent their hands in implementing ideas for the community.
  • Collabora and GStreamer spring in Sweden
    Earlier this month, a few of us from Collabora, Olivier Crête, Nicolas Dufresne, George Kiagiadakis and I attended the GStreamer Spring Hackfest in Lund, Sweden. Hosted by Axis Communications (who uses GStreamer in their surveillance cameras for many years now), it was a great opportunity for the GStreamer community to touch base and work on open bugs and pet projects. [...] As for myself, I mainly worked on (or rather started to work on) split-field interlacing support in GStreamer, adding relevant formats and modes in the GStreamer video library. In addition, as a Meson developer (Nirbheek Chauhan) was present, I took the opportunity to discuss with him the last bit of porting build system of Geoclue to Meson, a side project I've been working on. It helped me get it done faster but also helped Nirbheek find some issues in Meson and fix them! All in all, my first GStreamer hackfest was an awesome experience (even though I was not feeling well). It was also very nice to hangout and socialize with old and new friends in the GStreamer community after a long time. Many thanks again to Axis for hosting us in their offices! See you at the GStreamer Conference this fall!
  • Reality Redrawn Opens At The Tech
    The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose was filled on Thursday with visitors experiencing new takes on the issue of fake news by artists using mixed reality, card games and even scratch and sniff cards. These installations were the results of Mozilla’ Reality Redrawn challenge. We launched the competition last December to make the power of misinformation and its potential impacts visible and visceral. Winners were announced in February.
  • Tangerine UI problems
    I've been a big fan of Tangerine for a while, it's a bank that doesn't charge fees and does what I need to do. They used to have a great app and website and then it all went a bit wrong. It's now a HTML app for Desktop and mobile. This isn't the fault of the tools used, but there's some terrible choices in the app across both. [...] The overall feel of the app is that its full of spinners, far too cluttered and just to confusing. Hey not everything I've built is perfect, but even I can spot some real problems with this app. I pretty sure Tangerine can do better than this. And yes, I'm writing this while drinking a beer I recently bought, as shown on my transaction page.
  • Majority of software plagued by vulnerabilities as open source adoption soars [Ed: More of Black Duck's FUD]
  • SiFive Releases 'Expansion Board' to Build Interest in RISC-V Processor
  • FreeBSD 11.2 Beta 2 Available For Testing, Brings PTI Optimization
    The second beta release of FreeBSD 11.2 is now available for weekend testing. FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 is now available with a variety of bug fixes, a fix to restore boot support for the Banana Pi ARM board, a context switch optimization for page table isolation (PTI), DTrace improvements, various build fixes, and a range of other system fixes.
  • Sony Is Working On AMD Ryzen LLVM Compiler Improvements - Possibly For The PlayStation 5
    One of Sony's compiler experts has taken to working on some tuning for the AMD Ryzen "znver1" microarchitecture support within the LLVM compiler stack. This begs the question why Sony is working on Ryzen improvements if not for a future product.
  • Popular YouTuber Says Apple Won't Fix His iMac Pro Damaged While Disassembled

    The damage resulted when they dropped the display while attempting to reattach it to the aluminum chassis. Towards the end of the video, Sebastian also says the iMac Pro requires a new logic board and power supply unit, suggesting there may have been a short circuit that caused damage to internal components as well.

  • Most dangerous new cyber security threats [iophk: "Windows TCO, yet neither Microsoft nor Windows get a mention"]

Steam Controller Kernel Driver Is Landing In The Linux 4.18 Kernel

The Linux 4.18 kernel will feature the initial Steam Controller kernel driver that works without having to use the Steam client or using third-party user-space applications like the SC-Controller application. A few months back we reported on a kernel driver being worked on for the Steam Controller by an independent user/developer outside of the gates of Valve. In part through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been working on this native Steam Controller Linux kernel driver that works for both USB cable and wireless modes of the Steam Controller and is a proper HID driver. Read more

Video of AsteroidOS

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.2.2 and 5.2.3. 5.2.2 was tagged 6 weeks ago, but we never managed to release it because we did not have the patience to fix the Windows installers in time due to a broken CI. Windows installers are provided for 5.2.3 again. We'll only provide source tarballs for 5.2.2 and we encourage everyone to just skip this release and use 5.2.3 which contains a few more bug fixes. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using KDevelop 5.2.1. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 19