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Mdk 10.2 beta 3

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I lost my hdb night before last and with it went my installs of Sorcerer, Fedora, Vector, One Base, SUSE, a couple older PCLOS, a couple older gentoos, mdk cooker, and most hurtful my Slackware 10.0.

Having a spare coupla partitions on hda I thought I just had to replace my cooker and slack. So, I set off to download the latest of each.

Upon returning home from work last night I wanted to set up mandrake and take screenshots, thinking that'd make a good story for my fledgling site.

It took like no time to install and I noticed some new features in the installer, but nothing earth shattering. I was anxious to login to my new install and look around and take my screenshots.

First up, the nvidia drivers. They wouldn't build complaining about the output format something or other, then after reboot, it complained the sources weren't correct for my kernel version. Well, umm, yes it was - to the layperson's eyes. Turns out I had to change the extraversion in the Makefile to get them to build. Come on Mandrake, what's up with that!? Then they complained that rivafb support was blocking em, so off to the .config to take that out. How many people actually use rivafb? I think more folks use nvidia drivers! Sooo, got the nvidia drivers to build finally and onto the the much anticipated kde desktop.

But kde wouldn't start. Oh, I still have to put my ip address in /etc/hosts - geezus, this was a problem back two or three years ago. Still no work around or fix for that? It's a wonder I remembered it. But kde finally came up.

OMG!!! They are still using kde 3.2!!! Geez, so much for the reputation of bleeding edge! But that wasn't the worse of it. I found a very sparse menu with NO kontact! and most items listed wouldn't launch. This was after the terminals wouldn't work! The sound is non-existant tho it appears the correct drivers are loaded.

The problem with the terminals was no rights to /dev/null. I chmod 777 those and got a terminal. I tried to launch kontact and was told it didn't exist. <rolls eyes> So off to the "install software" link. Well it did launch but said kontact didn't exist, so I added a cooker repository. Now it couldn't install it cuz of libpim something. I tried to install that but that failed cuz libgpg something didn't exist. I looked on mirrors and sure enough not there. Lord love a duck.

At this point I decided it just wasn't worth it. I did get two screenshots. Here and here.

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opps - correction - kde version

I was informed that the correct kde version is 3.3.2 and not 3.2. I guess I was fooled by the 3.2 splashscreen and being overwhelmed with near showstopping problems, I didn't query to confirm. However, at this time I'll apologize for the misinformation, but it wasn't an official review for which I would have confirmed any information printed to the best of my ability.

installed packages include:
kdebase-3.3.2-64mdk
kdelibs-common-3.3.2-85mdk

I would also like to aplogize for my delay in posting this correction, but konqueror under mandrake would send my webpage to the bottom upon each depression of the spacebar. I tried adjusting the keyboard driver to kbd before concluding must be yet another bug and using mozilla.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

also...

upon booting into mandrake to check the kde version, I had to once again grant myself privileges to /dev/null, modprobe the nvidia drivers despite entries in modprobe.conf, ln my mouse (I guess I could fix the entry in xorg.conf - but one or the other needs to be done to use the mouse - shoudn't that be correct upon install?), and fix permissions on /dev/nvidia* before I could even try to use konqueror.

Geez, I just don't know what has happened to mandrake. I used to run cooker updated daily and reinstalled from snapshots from time to time to test, and never never had so many issues. But that was a year and a half ago.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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