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More in Tux Machines

BSD: ZFS, NetBSD and BSD Router Project Release 1.97

  • An Introduction to ZFS A Place to Start

    ZFS has become increasingly popular in recent years. ZFS on Linux (ZoL) has pushed the envelope and exposed many newcomers to the ZFS fold. iXsystems has adopted the newer codebase, now called OpenZFS, into its codebase for TrueNAS CORE. The purpose of this article is to help those of you who have heard about ZFS but have not yet had the opportunity to research it.

    Our hope is that we leave you with a better understanding of how and why it works the way it does. Knowledge is key to the decision-making process, and we feel that ZFS is something worth considering for most organizations.

  • GSoC Reports: Enhancing Syzkaller support for NetBSD, Part 2

    As a part of Google summer code 2020, I have been working on Enhance the Syzkaller support for NetBSD. This post summarises the work done in the past month. For work done in the first coding period, you can take a look at the previous post.

  • The GNU GDB Debugger and NetBSD (Part 3)

    I've written an integration of GDB with fork(2) and vfork(2) events. Unfortunately, this support (present in a local copy of GDB in the base-system) had not been merged so far, because there is a generic kernel regression with the pg_jobc variable. This variable can be called a reference counter of the number of processes within a process group that has a parent with control over a terminal. The semantics of this variable are not very well defined and in the result the number can become negative. This unexpected state of pg_jobc resulted in spurious crashes during kernel fuzzing. As a result new kernel assertions checking for non-negative pg_jobc values were introduced in order to catch the anomalies quickly. GDB as a ptrace(2)-based application happened to reproduce negative pg_jobc values quickly and reliably and this stopped the further adoption of the fork(2) and vfork(2) patch in GDB, until the pg_jobc behavior is enhanced. I was planning to include support for posix_spawn(3) events as well, as they are implemented as a first-class operation through a syscall, however this is also blocked by the pg_jobc blocker.

  • BSD Router Project Release 1.97 (04/08/2020)

today's howtos

Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, This Week in Linux and LINUX Unplugged

  • mintCast 340.5 – Will It Blend?

    1:41 Interview with Jason van Gumster 1:01:48 Feedback 1:11:03 Check This Out 1:15:27 Outro In our Innards section, we become blender experts with Jason van Gumster’s help. And finally, the feedback and a few suggestions.

  • This Week in Linux 111: Linux 5.8, BootHole & GRUB2 Flaws, Firefox 79, JellyFin, Nitrux, & More

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got some really cool hardware news, we’ve finally got some Linux laptops equipped with an AMD Ryzen 4000H series processor. These laptops are thanks to Tuxedo Computers and KDE Slimbook. Cooler Master has launched a kickstarter campaign to make a pretty slick Case for the Raspberry Pi 4. We’ve also got a LOT of App News this week with the latest release of the most popular open source email client, Thunderbird 78 from Mozilla. KDE has released version 7.0.0 of digiKam. If you’ve been wanting an open source way to control your RGB lights on your devices then OpenRGB may be the tool for you. And finally, PeerTube has announced the 2.3.0 release that comes with the much anticipated Global Search feature! All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • There’s a Hole in my Boot! | LINUX Unplugged 365

    We explain why BootHole is getting so much attention and break down the key issues. Then we review our favorite Linux-compatible headsets.

GNU/FSF: GNU Debugger (GDB), Free Software Foundation (FSF) Tech Team and Freedom Isn't Free

  • GNU Debugger Adding eBPF Debugging Support

    The GNU Debugger (GDB) has merged initial support for debugging of eBPF code that is traditionally consumed by the Linux kernel as part of this in-kernel special purpose virtual machine.  Oracle engineer Jose Marchesi contributed the new target of (e)BPF for basic debugging at this point. 

  • Help the FSF tech team empower software users

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) tech team is the four-person cornerstone of the primary infrastructure of the FSF and the GNU Project, providing the backbone for hundreds of free software projects, and they epitomize the hard work, creativity, and can-do attitude that characterize the free software movement. They’re pretty modest about it, but I think they deserve some serious credit: it’s only because of their everyday efforts (with the help of volunteers all over the world) that the FSF can boast that we can host our own services entirely on free software, and help other people to become freer every day. It’s also largely to their credit that the FSF staff were able to shift to mostly remote work this spring with barely a blip in our operations.

  • Freedom Isn't Free

    Seen in that vein, the radical undertones of open source didn’t just come out of nowhere, and they’re not unique to software. Instead, open source is simply a response to the very real contradictions that abound when property rights are applied to information. Where it fails is by offering an easy way out—by creating a microcosm, itself commodified, that suspends intellectual [sic] property [sic] conventions on a small scale, without ever presenting a viable alternative to the wider intellectual property regime required under capitalism.