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Latest news on Linux distributions and BSD projects
Updated: 8 hours 15 min ago

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 840

Monday 11th of November 2019 12:09:04 AM
This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Review: Fedora 31 Workstation News: Fedora works to improve Python performance, FreeBSD gets faster networking thanks to Netflix, elementary team plans new greeter and system installer Tips and tricks: Monitoring and recording user activity Released last week: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, NethServer....

Development Release: OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Alpha 1

Sunday 10th of November 2019 04:42:06 AM
Cristina Sgubbi has announced the availability of the first alpha release OpenMandriva Lx 4.1, the upcoming new stable version of the project's desktop-oriented Linux distribution. An interesting new feature of this release is an experimental Linux kernel built with the Clang compiler: "The first OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 release....

BSD Release: XigmaNAS 12.1.0.4

Friday 8th of November 2019 06:30:32 AM
Michael Zoon has announced the release of XigmaNAS 12.1.0.4, the latest stable version of the project's embedded, open-source NAS (Network-Attached Storage) distribution based on FreeBSD. This version upgrades the underlying FreeBSD base system to version 12.1: "We are pleased to announce the release of XigmaNAS version 12.1.0.4.7091 -....

Development Release: Project Trident Void Alpha

Thursday 7th of November 2019 11:25:09 PM
The Project Trident team has published their first development snapshot which uses Void as its base. Past versions of Project Trident have been based on TrueOS and this alpha snapshot demonstrates some of the features Trident can provide on its new base. "What does this image provide? A....

OS Release: OpenIndiana 2019.10

Thursday 7th of November 2019 04:25:53 PM
OpenIndiana is a continuation of the OpenSolaris operating system. OpenIndiana is part of the Illumos Foundation, and provides a true open-source community alternative to Solaris 11 and Solaris 11 Express, with an open development model and full community participation. The project's latest release, OpenIndiana Hipster 2019.10, migrates some....

Distribution Release: NethServer 7.7

Wednesday 6th of November 2019 06:48:21 PM
NethServer is a CentOS-based Linux distribution for servers. The product's main feature is a modular design which makes it simple to turn the distribution into a mail server and filter, web server, groupware, firewall, web filter, IPS/IDS or VPN server. The project's latest release is NethServer 7.7 and....

Distribution Release: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1

Tuesday 5th of November 2019 03:18:48 PM
Red Hat has announced the availability of the first update to the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.x series. The new release, 8.1, introduces a new, predictable update cycle with minor releases every six months. It also provides better SELInux controls for dealing with containers. This release also focuses....

BSD Release: FreeBSD 12.1

Monday 4th of November 2019 07:50:04 PM
Glen Barber has announced the release of FreeBSD 12.1. The new version includes BearSSL, the Clang compiler has been updated to version 8.0.1, and OpenSSL has also been updated. The 12.x series of FreeBSD is expected to receive support through to June 2024. The release announcement states:....

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 839

Monday 4th of November 2019 12:35:48 AM
This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Review: MX Linux 19News: Ubuntu plans features for 20.04, Fedora developer explains benefits of Modularity, Fedora 29 nears its end of life, Netunner drops Manjaro-based editionTips and tricks: Manipulating PDFsReleased last week: Fedora 31, ALT 9.0, Zentyal 6.1Torrent corner: ALT, Android-x86, Arch, ArcoLinux,....

BSD Release: MidnightBSD 1.2

Friday 1st of November 2019 06:52:41 AM
Lucas Holt has announced the release of MidnightBSD 1.2, the latest stable version of the project's FreeBSD-derived operating system with a goal to create an easy-to-use desktop with graphical ports management and system configuration. This version is mostly a security and bug-fix update: "I'm happy to announce the....

Distribution Release: KaOS 2019.10

Thursday 31st of October 2019 08:16:10 PM
The KaOS team has published a new snapshot of the distribution's rolling desktop operating system. The project is removing Python 2 packages and is publishing cutting edge packages for KDE Plasma 5.17. "Quite a few big changes for this release, probably the biggest news for this release is....

Distribution Release: Zentyal Server 6.1

Wednesday 30th of October 2019 02:32:05 PM
Zentyal Server is a commercial unified network server that offers easy and efficient computer network administration for small and medium-size businesses. The project's latest release, Zentyal Server 6.1, is a minor update to the 6.0 release and is based on Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS. "Zentyal development team today announced....

Distribution Release: Fedora 31

Tuesday 29th of October 2019 03:40:48 PM
Matthew Miller has announced the release of Fedora 31. The new version includes a special isolated container feature called Fedora Toolbox. "If you haven't used the Fedora Toolbox, this is a great time to try it out. This is a simple tool for launching and managing personal workspace....

Distribution Release: ALT Linux 9.0

Monday 28th of October 2019 01:50:07 PM
ALT Linux is an independently developed distribution which is available in Workstation, Server and Education editions. The distribution runs on several CPU architectures, making it run on a wide range of hardware. The project's latest release is ALT Linux 9.0. An English translation of the original Russian release....

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 838

Monday 28th of October 2019 12:25:09 AM
This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Review: Xubuntu 19.10News: UBports posts status on porting to new platforms, DragonFly BSD offers emergency mode for HAMMER, Xfce team plans 4.16Questions and answers: Clarifying how init and service managers work togetherTorrent corner: Alpine, ArchBang, Archman, BSDRP, Clonezilla, ExTiX, GhostBSD, KDE neon, MX,....

Development Release: LibreELEC 9.2 Beta 2

Sunday 27th of October 2019 11:05:00 PM
LibreELEC is a minimal operating system for running the Kodi media centre. The LibreELEC project has published a new beta development snapshot in the lead-up to LibreELEC 9.2. The new snapshot includes partial support for the Raspberry Pi 4. Earlier versions of the Raspberry Pi are still supported.....

BSD Release: GhostBSD 19.10

Sunday 27th of October 2019 01:11:59 AM
Eric Turgeon has announced the release of GhostBSD 19.10, the latest stable build of the project's desktop-oriented, rolling-release operating system based on TrueOS and featuring the MATE desktop environment: "I am happy to announce the availability of GhostBSD 19.10 with some improvement to the live ISO image and....

Distribution Release: Voyager 19.10

Friday 25th of October 2019 02:16:37 PM
The Voyager Live team has published a new version of the project's Ubuntu-based distribution. The new version, Voyager Live 19.10, ships with GNOME 3.34 and version 5.3 of the Linux kernel. The new release provides nine months of support. An English translation of the project's release announcement (in....

Distribution Release: PrimTux 5

Wednesday 23rd of October 2019 11:31:03 PM
PrimTux is a lightweight distribution developed by a small team of school teachers and computer enthusiasts in the educational environment. The project's latest release is available in two editions with one based on Lubuntu for 64-bit machines and one on Debian for 32-bit machines. An English translation of....

Distribution Release: ExTiX 19.10

Wednesday 23rd of October 2019 09:28:19 PM
ExTiX is a desktop distribution based on Ubuntu. The project's latest release, ExTiX 19.10, is based on Ubuntu 19.10 and features the LXQt desktop. The project's release announcement states: "I have made a new version of ExTiX - The Ultimate Linux System. I call it ExTiX 19.10 LXQt....

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Mutter & GNOME Shell Hackfest, PyCon Africa 2019 (Recap) and More Python

  • Mutter & GNOME Shell Hackfest

    A couple of weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to attend the Mutter & GNOME Shell hackfest in Leidschendam.

  • Real Python: PyCon Africa 2019 (Recap)

    PyCon Africa was a wonderful, inspiring, and technically enlightening conference that took place in Accra, Ghana from August 6 to 10, 2019 at the University of Ghana. This conference was the very first pan-African conference for Python developers and was attended by 323 Pythonistas from 26 different countries. Most of the attendees traveled from countries around Africa, and a number of speakers came from the US, the Netherlands, Germany, Brazil, and Italy. Python is becoming more and more adopted all across the globe. In Africa, Python is earning a special place for itself, where it’s used extensively for web development and data science. African businesses are looking for developers with Python skills in these areas, and having a PyCon in Africa provides a foundation to help support African programmers. [...] The day after the main conference was dedicated to sprints! This is where people group up to work on various open source Python projects. I was part of a team that worked on Cookie Cutter and other related projects. I submitted a PR that got merged into the project and I also helped mentor other team members. I highly recommend anyone who has not attended a sprint before to do so! It’s a great way to practice your skills, contribute to an open source project, and meet the developers involved with the project.

  • Tutorial: How to Read Stata Files in Python with Pandas

    We are soon going to practically answer how to open a Stata file in Python? In Python, there are two useful packages called Pyreadstat, and Pandas that enable us to open .dta files. If we are working with Pandas, the read_stata method will help us import a .dta into a Pandas dataframe. Furthermore, the package Pyreadstat, which is dependent on Pandas, will also create a Pandas dataframe from a .dta file.

  • Python Software Foundation: Seeking Developers for Paid Contract Improving pip

    The Python Software Foundation Packaging Working Group is receiving funding to work on the design, implementation, and rollout of pip's next-generation dependency resolver. (We'll be able to publicly name the funders later this month and in early December.) pip is the official package installer for Python. pip aims to make it easy for the millions of people who use Python to download and install Python libraries and applications (open source and closed source, source and binary, globally and within isolated virtual environments). It's a foundational component of the Python ecosystem and broader computer software and technology landscape. This project aims to complete the design, implementation, and rollout of pip's next-generation dependency resolver. This will lower the barriers to installing Python software, empowering users to get a version of a package that works. It will also lower the barriers to distributing Python software, empowering developers to make their work available in an easily reusable form. Because of the size of the project, funding has been allocated to secure two contractors, a senior developer and an intermediate developer, to work on development, testing and building test infrastructure, code review, bug triage, and assisting in the rollout of necessary features.

  • Rename all files in a directory to the md5 hash

Database of 200+ smartphones that can run Linux (unofficially)

The vast majority of smartphones in the world ship with some version of Google’s Android operating system. And most of them are only supported by their manufacturers for a few years. Have a phone that’s 3-4 years old? Then you’re probably not getting any Android updates anymore. No more security patches. No new features. Of course, some folks can run custom ROMs such as LineageOS, which lets you install updates indefinitely… but want to break out of Android altogether? There are a handful of other GNU/Linux-based operating systems including Ubuntu Touch, postmarketOS, and Maemo Leste that are designed to, among other things, help give your phone a longer lifespan. One tricky thing can be figuring out which phones are supported. That’s where a new Can My Phone Run Linux database from TuxPhones comes in. Read more

Linux driver patches indicate AMD is readying integer scaling

Both Intel and Nvidia have released graphics driver updates to enable integer scaling options this year. Intel made a big song and dance out of the development process with Tweets and blog updates trailing the graphics driver feature. Then integer scaling became available for Intel Gen11 graphics users after a September driver update. Nvidia actually pipped Intel to the post by implementing integer scaling (for Turing GPUs) in its Gamescom driver release in August - it snuck in the update without much fanfare as it simultaneously boosted a number of AAA games performance and added some new image sharpening features. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Servers: Boston Children’s Hospital, IBM and SUSE in High-Performance Computing (HPC)

  • How Boston Children’s Hospital Augments Doctors Cognition with Red Hat OpenShift

    Software can be an enabler for healers. At Red Hat, we’ve seen this first hand from customers like Boston Children’s Hospital. That venerable infirmary is using Red Hat OpenShift and Linux containers to enhance their medical capabilities, and to augment their doctors cognitive capacity.

  • Entry Server Bang For The Buck, IBM i Versus Red Hat Linux

    In last week’s issue, we did a competitive analysis of the entry, single-socket Power S914 machines running IBM i against Dell PowerEdge servers using various Intel Xeon processors as well as an AMD Epyc chip running a Windows Server and SQL Server stack from Microsoft. This week, and particularly in the wake of IBM’s recent acquisition of Red Hat, we are looking at how entry IBM i platforms rate in terms of cost and performance against X86 machines running a Linux stack and an appropriate open source relational database that has enterprise support. Just as a recap from last week’s story, the IBM i matchup against Windows Server systems were encouraging in that very small configurations of the Power Systems machine running IBM i were less expensive per unit of online transaction processing performance as well as per user. However, on slightly larger configurations of single socket machines, thanks mostly to the very high cost per core of the IBM i operating system and its integrated middleware and database as you move from the P05 to P10 software tiers on the Power S914, the capital outlay can get very large at list price for the Power iron, and the software gets very pricey, too. The only thing that keeps the IBM i platform in the running is the substantially higher performance per core that the Power9 chip offers on machines with four, six, or eight cores. Such processors are fairly modest by 2019 standards, by the way, when a high-end chip has 24, 28, 32, or now 64 cores, and even mainstream ones have 12, 16, or 18 cores. If you want to see the rationale of the hardware configurations that we ginned up for the comparisons, we suggest that you review the story from last week. Suffice it to say, we tried to get machines with roughly the same core counts and configuration across the Power and X86 machines, and generally, the X86 cores for these classes of single socket servers do a lot less work.

  • Rise of the Chameleon – SUSE at SC19

    The impact of High-Performance Computing (HPC) goes beyond traditional research boundaries to enhance our daily lives.  SC19 is the international conference for High Performance Computing, networking, storage and analysis taking place in Denver November 17-22.  SUSE will once again have a strong presence at SC19 – and if you are attending we would love to talk to you!  Our SUSE booth (#1917) will include our popular Partner Theater as well as a VR light saber game with a Star Wars themed backdrop.  We will showcase SUSE’s HPC core solutions (OS, tools and Services) as well as AI/ML, Storage and Cloud open source products.  Plus, during the gala opening reception we will premier our new mini-movie “Sam the IT Manager in The Way of the Chameleon: The Quest for HPC” which you don’t want to miss (we’ll provide the popcorn)!