Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LWN

Syndicate content
LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 3 hours 27 min ago

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for March 23, 2017

Thursday 23rd of March 2017 12:59:15 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for March 23, 2017 is available.

GitLab 9.0 Released with Subgroups and Deploy Boards

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 07:43:02 PM
GitLab 9.0 has been released with many new features and improvements. "In the last several releases, GitLab has transformed how development teams get from idea to production. In just a few minutes, you can deploy GitLab to a container scheduler, add CI/CD with auto deployed review apps, utilize ChatOps, and analyze your cycle time. With 9.0 you can now watch your deploys with deploy boards and monitor application performance with Prometheus."

NTPsec Project announces 0.9.7

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 06:10:04 PM
The NTPsec Project has announced the 0.9.7 release of NTPsec, with assistance from the Mozilla Foundation's "Secure Open Source" initiative. NTPsec is an implementation of the Network Time Protocol (NTP). "NTPsec 0.9.7 incorporates significant improvements in security, accuracy, precision, visualization, and usability, with assistance, contributions, and audits provided by infosec researchers and other technical contributors. For this release, the NTPsec Project worked particularly closely with the Mozilla Foundation's "Secure Open Source" initiative, who funded an infosec audit, and with Cure53.de, who provided the audit."

GNOME 3.24 released

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 05:43:39 PM
The GNOME Project has announced the release of GNOME 3.24, "Portland". "This release is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features such as night light, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. GNOME's existing applications have been improved and there is also a new Recipes app. Improvements to our platform include refined notifications and several revamped settings panels."

Stable kernel updates

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 03:52:09 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has released stable kernels 4.10.5, 4.9.17, and 4.4.56. All of them contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 03:46:34 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (irssi), Fedora (qemu), openSUSE (mbedtls), and Ubuntu (eglibc, glibc).

[$] Unaddressable device memory

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 02:32:24 PM
In a morning plenary session on the first day of the 2017 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit, Jérôme Glisse led a discussion on memory that cannot be addressed by the CPU because it lives in devices like GPUs or FPGAs. There is often a substantial pile of memory on these devices and it can be accessed much more quickly by the devices than the system RAM can be. Making it easier for user-space programmers to use that memory transparently is the goal of the heterogeneous memory management (HMM) patches that Glisse has been working on.

Garrett: A new Shim review process

Wednesday 22nd of March 2017 01:50:14 PM
Matthew Garrett announces a new, hopefully more efficient process for reviewing bootloaders to be used with Shim in UEFI secure boot systems. "To that end, we're adopting a new model. A mailing list has been created at shim-review@lists.freedesktop.org, and members of this list will review submissions and provide a recommendation to Microsoft on whether these should be signed or not."

O-MG, the Developer Preview of Android O is here! (Android Developers Blog)

Tuesday 21st of March 2017 08:39:33 PM
The Android Developers Blog introduces the first developer preview of Android O. This version includes background limits, notification channels, autofill APIs, PIP for handsets, font resources in XML, adaptive icons, and much more. "Building on the work we began in Nougat, Android O puts a big priority on improving a user's battery life and the device's interactive performance. To make this possible, we've put additional automatic limits on what apps can do in the background, in three main areas: implicit broadcasts, background services, and location updates. These changes will make it easier to create apps that have minimal impact on a user's device and battery. Background limits represent a significant change in Android, so we want every developer to get familiar with them."

KDevelop 5.1.0 released

Tuesday 21st of March 2017 06:39:28 PM
KDevelop is KDE's Integrated Development Environment (IDE). Version 5.1 has been released with LLDB support, Analyzer run mode, initial OpenCL language support, improved Python language support, and more.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 released

Tuesday 21st of March 2017 04:22:31 PM
Red Hat has announced the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9. "Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 delivers new hardware support developed in collaboration with Red Hat partners which helps to provide a smooth transition of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 production deployments to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 environments. Additionally, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.9 adds updates to TLS 1.2 to further enhance secure communications and provide broader support for the latest PCI-DSS standards, better equipping enterprises to offer more secure online transactions."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 21st of March 2017 04:12:56 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (sitesummary), Fedora (jasper, knot-resolver, R, rkward, rpm-ostree, rpy, w3m, and xen), openSUSE (firefox), Red Hat (bash, coreutils, glibc, gnutls, kernel, libguestfs, ocaml, openssh, qemu-kvm, quagga, samba, samba4, subscription-manager, tigervnc, and wireshark), and Ubuntu (eglibc, glibc, firefox, freetype, gnutls26, NVIDIA graphics, and nvidia-graphics-drivers-375).

[$] ZONE_DEVICE and the future of struct page

Tuesday 21st of March 2017 12:59:06 PM
The opening session of the 2017 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit covered a familiar topic: how to represent (possibly massive) persistent-memory arrays to various subsystems in the kernel. This session, led by Dan Williams, focused in particular on the ZONE_DEVICE abstraction and whether the kernel should use page structures to represent persistent memory or not.

The Intel Edison: Linux Maker Machine in a Matchbox (Linux.com)

Monday 20th of March 2017 07:21:43 PM
Linux.com takes a look at the Intel Edison. "The Intel Edison is a physically tiny computer that draws a small amount of power and breaks out plenty of connections to allow it to interact with other electronics. It begs to be the brain of your next electronics tinkering project, with all the basics in a tiny package and an easy way to connect other things you might need."

Security updates for Monday

Monday 20th of March 2017 03:36:56 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (firefox, mbedtls, and wordpress), CentOS (firefox, openjpeg, and tomcat6), Debian (deluge, ioquake3, r-base, and wireshark), Fedora (qemu, rabbitmq-server, and sscg), Gentoo (adobe-flash, openoffice-bin, and putty), openSUSE (Chromium, irssi, putty, and roundcubemail), Oracle (firefox and openjpeg), Red Hat (firefox and openjpeg), Scientific Linux (firefox and openjpeg), and SUSE (firefox).

OpenSSH 7.5 released

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:18:12 PM
OpenSSH 7.5 is out. This is primarily a bug-fix release, but it also makes the use of privilege separation mandatory and removes support for building against old, unsupported OpenSSL releases.

Kernel prepatch 4.11-rc3

Monday 20th of March 2017 12:48:47 PM
The 4.11-rc3 kernel prepatch is out. "As is our usual pattern after the merge window, rc3 is larger than rc2, but this is hopefully the point where things start to shrink and calm down."

Weekend stable kernel updates

Sunday 19th of March 2017 03:24:50 PM
The 4.10.4, 4.9.16, and 4.4.55 stable kernels are out with another set of important fixes.

Ubuntu: A follow-up on 32-bit powerpc architecture

Friday 17th of March 2017 06:27:20 PM
Ubuntu has discontinued support for the 32-bit powerpc architecture in Zesty Zappus (17.04). "We are well into Feature Freeze at this point, so an update is overdue. As of Feature Freeze in February, the status is that powerpc packages are no longer considered for proposed-migration, and we have discontinued all CD image builds for powerpc in zesty. For the moment, uploads continue to be built for powerpc in Launchpad, and packages are still published in the archive. You should expect both to be discontinued before the 17.04 release."

Gregg: perf sched for Linux CPU scheduler analysis

Friday 17th of March 2017 05:38:05 PM
Brendan Gregg shows how to do scheduler profiling with the perf sched command. "perf sched timehist was added in Linux 4.10, and shows the scheduler latency by event, including the time the task was waiting to be woken up (wait time) and the scheduler latency after wakeup to running (sch delay). It's the scheduler latency that we're more interested in tuning."

More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.