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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 1 hour 27 sec ago

[$] Notes from the LPC tracing microconference

6 hours 9 min ago
The "tracing and BPF" microconference was held on the final day of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference; it covered a number of topics relevant to heavy users of kernel and user-space tracing. Read on for a summary of a number of those discussions on topics like BPF introspection, stack traces, kprobes, uprobes, and the Common Trace Format.

Security updates for Thursday

11 hours 22 min ago
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (tomcat7), Debian (kernel and perl), Fedora (libwmf and mpg123), Mageia (bluez, ffmpeg, gstreamer0.10-plugins-good, gstreamer1.0-plugins-good, libwmf, tomcat, and tor), openSUSE (emacs, fossil, freexl, php5, and xen), Red Hat (augeas, rh-mysql56-mysql, samba, and samba4), Scientific Linux (augeas, samba, and samba4), Slackware (samba), SUSE (emacs and kernel), and Ubuntu (qemu).

Red Hat's new patent promise

13 hours 17 min ago
Red Hat has announced an update to its patent promise, wherein the company says it will not enforce its patents against anybody who might be infringing them with open-source software. The new version expands the promise to all software covered by an OSI-approved license, including permissive licenses. The attached FAQ notes that Red Hat now possesses over 2,000 patents.

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 21, 2017

Thursday 21st of September 2017 12:25:41 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 21, 2017 is available.

[$] Linking commits to reviews

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 04:19:01 PM

In a talk in the refereed track of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference, Alexandre Courouble presented the email2git tool that links kernel commits to their review discussion on the mailing lists. Email2git is a plugin for cregit, which implements token-level history for a Git repository; we covered a talk on cregit just over one year ago. Email2git combines cregit with Patchwork to link the commit to a patch and its discussion threads from any of the mailing lists that are scanned by patchwork.kernel.org. The result is a way to easily find the discussion that led to a piece of code—or even just a token—changing in the kernel source tree.

GNOME Foundation partners with Purism to support its efforts to build the Librem 5 smartphone

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 03:40:36 PM
Last week KDE announced that they were working with Purism on the Librem 5 smartphone. The GNOME Foundation has also provided its endorsement and support of Purism’s efforts to build the Librem 5. "As part of the collaboration, if the campaign is successful the GNOME Foundation plans to enhance GNOME shell and general performance of the system with Purism to enable features on the Librem 5. Various GNOME technologies are used extensively in embedded devices today, and GNOME developers have experienced some of the challenges that face mobile computing specifically with the Nokia 770, N800 and N900, the One Laptop Per Child project’s XO laptop and FIC’s Neo1973 mobile phone."

An intro to machine learning (Opensource.com)

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 03:17:55 PM
Ulrich Drepper, once again an engineer at Red Hat, writes about machine learning on opensource.com. "Machine learning and artificial intelligence (ML/AI) mean different things to different people, but the newest approaches have one thing in common: They are based on the idea that a program's output should be created mostly automatically from a high-dimensional and possibly huge dataset, with minimal or no intervention or guidance from a human. Open source tools are used in a variety of machine learning and artificial intelligence projects. In this article, I'll provide an overview of the state of machine learning today."

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 03:13:02 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (emacs), Debian (apache2, gdk-pixbuf, and pyjwt), Fedora (autotrace, converseen, dmtx-utils, drawtiming, emacs, gtatool, imageinfo, ImageMagick, inkscape, jasper, k3d, kxstitch, libwpd, mingw-libzip, perl-Image-SubImageFind, pfstools, php-pecl-imagick, psiconv, q, rawtherapee, ripright, rss-glx, rubygem-rmagick, synfig, synfigstudio, techne, vdr-scraper2vdr, vips, and WindowMaker), Oracle (emacs and kernel), Red Hat (emacs and kernel), Scientific Linux (emacs), SUSE (emacs), and Ubuntu (apache2).

Stable kernels 4.13.3, 4.12.14, and 4.9.51

Wednesday 20th of September 2017 02:44:45 PM
The 4.13.3, 4.12.14, and 4.9.51 stable kernels have been released; each contains another set of important fixes. Note that this is the final update for the 4.12.x series.

[$] Building the kernel with clang

Tuesday 19th of September 2017 05:18:10 PM

Over the years, there has been a persistent effort to build the Linux kernel using the Clang C compiler that is part of the LLVM project. We last looked in on the effort in a report from the LLVM microconference at the 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), but we have followed it before that as well. At this year's LPC, two Google kernel engineers, Greg Hackmann and Nick Desaulniers, came to the Android microconference to update the status; at this point, it is possible to build two long-term support kernels (4.4 and 4.9) with Clang.

Moore: The 2017 Linux Security Summit

Tuesday 19th of September 2017 02:46:44 PM
Paul Moore has posted his notes from the 2017 Linux Security Summit, held September 14 and 15 in Los Angeles. "LinuxKit was designed to make it easy for people to create their own Linux distribution, with a strong focus on minimal OS installs such as one would use in a container hosting environment. LinuxKit has several features that make it interesting from a security perspective, the most notable being the read-only rootfs which is managed using external tooling. Applications are installed via signed container images."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 19th of September 2017 02:41:16 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (apache and ettercap), Debian (gdk-pixbuf and newsbeuter), Red Hat (kernel), Slackware (httpd, libgcrypt, and ruby), SUSE (kernel), and Ubuntu (bind9, kernel, libidn2-0, libxml2, linux, linux-aws, linux-gke, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-raspi2, linux-hwe, linux-lts-trusty, and linux-lts-xenial).

Schaller: Launching Pipewire

Tuesday 19th of September 2017 01:47:27 PM
Christian Schaller announces Pipewire, a media system that is meant to eventually replace PulseAudio and handle video as well. "Anyway as work progressed Wim decided to also take a look at Jack, as supporting the pro-audio usecase was an area PulseAudio had never tried to do, yet we felt that if we could ensure Pipewire supported the pro-audio usecase in addition to consumer level audio and video it would improve our multimedia infrastructure significantly and ensure pro-audio became a first class citizen on the Linux desktop." A video-only version will be shipping in Fedora 27.

[$] Testing kernels

Tuesday 19th of September 2017 01:40:04 AM

New kernels are released regularly, but it is not entirely clear how much in-depth testing they are actually getting. Even the mainline kernel may not be getting enough of the right kind of testing. That was the topic for a "birds of a feather" (BoF) meeting at this year's Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) held in mid-September in Los Angeles, CA. Dhaval Giani and Sasha Levin organized the BoF as a prelude to the Testing and Fuzzing microconference they were leading the next day.

[$] Notes from the LPC scheduler microconference

Monday 18th of September 2017 11:11:04 PM
The scheduler workloads microconference at the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference covered several aspects of the kernel's CPU scheduler. While workloads were on the agenda, so were a rework of the realtime scheduler's push/pull mechanism, a distinctly different approach to multi-core scheduling, and the use of tracing for workload simulation and analysis. As the following summary shows, CPU scheduling has not yet reached a point where all of the important questions have been answered.

EME is now a W3C recommendation

Monday 18th of September 2017 09:04:13 PM
The World Wide Web Consortium has put out a press release trumpeting its publication of the "Encrypted Media Extensions" as an official recommendation and enshrining DRM into what was previously a standard for open communication. See the EFF's open letter for a less rosy view of this development. "Today, the W3C bequeaths an legally unauditable attack-surface to browsers used by billions of people. They give media companies the power to sue or intimidate away those who might re-purpose video for people with disabilities. They side against the archivists who are scrambling to preserve the public record of our era. The W3C process has been abused by companies that made their fortunes by upsetting the established order, and now, thanks to EME, they’ll be able to ensure no one ever subjects them to the same innovative pressures."

Robinson: The state of open source accelerated graphics on ARM devices

Monday 18th of September 2017 07:20:50 PM
Peter Robinson looks at the state of open source accelerated graphics on ARM devices. "Despite the two bad examples above there’s actually been a lot of good change in the last five years. We now have a number of options for fully accelerated 2D/3D graphics on ARM SoCs and I run GNOME Shell on Wayland, yes the full open source shiny, on a number of different devices regularly."

Security updates for Monday

Monday 18th of September 2017 03:36:04 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (ffmpeg, lib32-libgcrypt, libgcrypt, linux-zen, and newsbeuter), Debian (emacs25, freexl, and tomcat8), Fedora (cyrus-imapd, FlightGear, freexl, gdm, kernel, LibRaw, ruby, and xen), Gentoo (binutils, chkrootkit, curl, gdk-pixbuf, gimps, git, kpathsea, mod_gnutls, perl, squirrelmail, subversion, supervisor, and webkit-gtk), Mageia (389-ds-base, kernel, kernel-linus, kernel-tmb, and mpg123), openSUSE (ffmpeg, ffmpeg2, qemu, and xen), Slackware (kernel), SUSE (xen), and Ubuntu (gdk-pixbuf).

[$] The rest of the 4.14 merge window

Sunday 17th of September 2017 10:36:43 PM
As is sometimes his way, Linus Torvalds released 4.14-rc1 and closed the merge window one day earlier than some might have expected. By the time, though, 11,556 non-merge changesets had found their way into the mainline repository, so there is no shortage of material for this release. Around 3,500 of those changes were pulled after the previous 4.14 merge-window summary; read on for an overview of what was in that last set.

Kernel prepatch 4.14-rc1

Sunday 17th of September 2017 04:23:28 PM
The 4.14-rc1 kernel prepatch is out, and the merge window is closed for this development cycle. "Yes, I realize this is a day early, and yes, I realize that if I had waited until tomorrow, I would also have hit the 26th anniversary of the Linux-0.01 release, but neither of those undeniable facts made me want to wait with closing the merge window." In the end, 11,556 non-merge changesets were pulled into the mainline for this release.

More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.