Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LWN

Syndicate content
LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 1 hour 45 min ago

Three stable kernels

Tuesday 4th of June 2019 02:49:01 PM
Stable kernels 5.1.7, 5.0.21, and 4.19.48 have been released. They all contain the usual set of important fixes. This is the last 5.0.y release and users should move to 5.1.y now.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 4th of June 2019 02:35:47 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (python-django and python2-django), Debian (heimdal), Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, and sqlite), openSUSE (containerd, docker, docker-runc, go, go1.11, go1.12, golang-github-docker-libnetwork and GraphicsMagick), Oracle (thunderbird), Red Hat (systemd and thunderbird), SUSE (bind and firefox), and Ubuntu (qtbase-opensource-src).

Šabić: eBPF and XDP for Processing Packets at Bare-metal Speed

Tuesday 4th of June 2019 02:04:17 PM
Nedim Šabić has written a tutorial article on using the eXpress Data Path for fast packet filtering. "Now comes the most relevant part of our XDP program that deals with packet’s processing logic. XDP ships with a predefined set of verdicts that determine how the kernel diverts the packet flow. For instance, we can pass the packet to the regular network stack, drop it, redirect the packet to another NIC and such. In our case, XDP_DROP yields an ultra-fast packet drop."

[$] Yet another try for fs-verity

Monday 3rd of June 2019 09:48:24 PM
The fs‑verity mechanism has its origins in the Android project; its purpose is to make individual files read-only and enable the kernel to detect any modifications that might have been made, even if those changes happen offline. Previous fs‑verity implementations have run into criticism in the development community, and none have been merged. A new version of the patch set was posted on May 23; it features a changed user-space API and may have a better chance of getting into the mainline.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 3rd of June 2019 03:02:59 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (curl, lib32-curl, lib32-libcurl-compat, lib32-libcurl-gnutls, libcurl-compat, libcurl-gnutls, and live-media), Debian (doxygen and php5), Fedora (cryptopp, drupal7-context, drupal7-ds, drupal7-module_filter, drupal7-path_breadcrumbs, drupal7-uuid, drupal7-views, drupal7-xmlsitemap, and sleuthkit), openSUSE (axis, chromium, containerd, docker, docker-runc, go, go1.11, go1.12, golang-github-docker-libnetwork, curl, doxygen, GraphicsMagick, java-1_7_0-openjdk, libtasn1, libvirt, lxc, lxcfs, NetworkManager, php5, php7, screen, sles12sp3-docker-image, sles12sp4-image, system-user-root, and thunderbird), Oracle (kernel), SUSE (apache2-mod_jk and libpng16), and Ubuntu (doxygen).

Kernel prepatch 5.2-rc3

Monday 3rd of June 2019 01:17:48 PM
The 5.2-rc3 kernel prepatch has been released. "Anyway, even ignoring the SPDX changes, there's just a lot of small fixes spread all over, not anything that looks particularly scary or worrisome. Maybe next week is when the other shoe drops, but maybe this will just be a nice calm release. That would be lovely."

Five new stable kernels

Friday 31st of May 2019 04:15:32 PM
The 5.1.6, 5.0.20, 4.19.47, 4.14.123, and 4.9.180 stable kernels have been released. As usual, they contain important fixes throughout the kernel tree; users of those series should upgrade.

[$] SIGnals from KubeCon

Friday 31st of May 2019 03:04:05 PM
The basic organizational construct within the Kubernetes project is a set of Special Interest Groups (SIGs), each of which represents a different area of responsibility within the project. Introductions to what the various SIGs do, as well as more detailed sessions, were a core part of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2019, as the different groups explained what they're doing now and their plans for the future. Two sessions, in particular, covered the work of the Release and Architecture SIGs, both of which have a key role in driving the project forward.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 31st of May 2019 01:38:14 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (miniupnpd and qemu), Fedora (drupal7-entity and xen), openSUSE (kernel), Oracle (bind and firefox), Red Hat (go-toolset-1.11-golang), SUSE (cronie, evolution, firefox, gnome-shell, java-1_7_0-openjdk, jpeg, and mailman), and Ubuntu (corosync, evolution-data-server, gnutls28, and libseccomp).

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Firefox, Graphene, Krita update in Tumbleweed

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week. The snapshots furnished the update for KDE Applications 19.08.1 and updated several libraries including Intel’s Graphene library OS. Snapshot 20190917 delivered four packages. The Graphene package updated to 1.10.0 and now uses an ancillary library called (micro) µTest for its test suite, which makes possible to build and run the test suite without depending on GLib. Mozilla Firefox 69.0 provided Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) with stronger privacy protections and added support for receiving multiple video codecs to makes it easier for WebRTC conferencing services to mix video from different clients. The other two package updates in the snapshot were icecream 1.3, which takes compile jobs from a build and distributes it among remote machines allowing a parallel build, and the HTTP client/server library for GNOME libsoup 2.66.3. The update of icecream 1.3 improved the speed of creating compiler tarballs. The snapshot is trending at a moderately stable rating of 87, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Epiphany Technology Preview Users: Action Required

    Epiphany Technology Preview has moved from https://sdk.gnome.org to https://nightly.gnome.org. The old Epiphany Technology Preview is now end-of-life. Action is required to update. If you installed Epiphany Technology Preview prior to a couple minutes ago, uninstall it using GNOME Software and then reinstall using this new flatpakref.

  • Qt Quick on Vulkan, Metal, and Direct3D - Part 2

    Let's continue where we left off in the first post. We saw an example of a Qt Quick application running on Linux on top of OpenGL and Vulkan. We also saw a Vulkan frame capture in RenderDoc, which is not just an invaluable tool during Qt development work, but can also be useful to anyone who wants to dig deeper and understand better how Qt Quick renders a frame (or for that matter troubleshoot problems in an application's rendering). Now in this post we are going to focus on what Qt 5.14 offers for macOS and Windows.

  • Renewing the Modularity objective

    Now that Modularity is available for all Fedora variants, it’s time to address issues discovered and improve the experience for packagers and users. The Modularity team identified a number of projects that will improve the usefulness of Modularity and the experience of creating modules for packagers. We are proposing a renewed objective to the Fedora Council.

  • Boardcon Idea3399 Features-Rich SBC Comes with M.2 NVMe SSD and 4G LTE PCIe Sockets

    Back in 2017, Boardcon introduced EM3399 single board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 processor through the company’s PICO3399 SO-DIMM system-on-module.

  • Random Number Generator Assembly

    Learn how to assemble your NeuG USB True Random Number Generator Assembly from https://shop.fsf.org/

  • Standing on the shoulders of giants

    This changed everything, and it led to the birth of ever greater backgammon neural networks that could provide world-class competition as well as world-class analysis. The first great program to follow and raise the standard was Jellyfish, after which came Snowie, and even a magnificent open-source project: GNU Backgammon, which to this day is the second strongest backgammon software available. It too can be found at its source site. For documentation, refer to my online manual, “All About GNU”.

Android Leftovers