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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 1 hour 59 min ago

Some weekend stable kernel updates

Sunday 6th of October 2019 04:41:59 PM
The 5.3.4, 5.2.19, 4.19.77, 4.14.147, 4.9.195, and 4.4.195 stable kernel updates have all been released; each contains a relatively large set of important fixes and updates.

[$] What to do about CVE numbers

Friday 4th of October 2019 03:14:31 PM
Common Vulnerability and Exposure (CVE) numbers have been used for many years as a way of uniquely identifying software vulnerabilities. It has become increasingly clear in recent years that there are problems with CVE numbers, though, and increasing numbers of vulnerabilities are not being assigned CVE numbers at all. At the 2019 Kernel Recipes event, Greg Kroah-Hartman delivered a "40-minute rant with an unsatisfactory conclusion" on CVE numbers and how the situation might be improved. The conclusion may be "unsatisfactory", but it seems destined to stir up some discussion regardless.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 4th of October 2019 02:44:59 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (exim, ruby, ruby-rdoc, ruby2.5, and systemd), Debian (openconnect), Mageia (thunderbird), openSUSE (lxc and mosquitto), Oracle (kernel and patch), Scientific Linux (patch), SUSE (firefox, java-1_7_0-ibm, and sqlite3), and Ubuntu (clamav).

Calibre 4.0 released

Friday 4th of October 2019 01:50:56 PM
Version 4.0 of the Calibre ebook management application is out. "It has been two years since calibre 3.0. This time has been spent mostly in making the calibre Content server ever more capable as well as migrating calibre itself from Qt WebKit to Qt WebEngine, because the former is no longer maintained. The Content server has gained the ability to Edit metadata, Add/remove books and even Convert books to and from all the formats calibre itself supports. It is now a full fledged interface to your calibre libraries."

[$] Why printk() is so complicated (and how to fix it)

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 03:46:19 PM
The kernel's printk() function seems like it should be relatively simple; all it does is format a string and output it to the kernel logs. That simplicity hides a lot of underlying complexity, though, and that complexity is why kernel developers are still unhappy with printk() after 28 years. At the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, John Ogness explained where the complexity in printk() comes from and what is being done to improve the situation.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 02:41:39 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel), Debian (jackson-databind, libapreq2, and subversion), Fedora (glpi, memcached, and zeromq), openSUSE (rust), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (patch), and SUSE (dovecot23, git, jasper, libseccomp, and thunderbird).

PostgreSQL 12 released

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 01:21:32 PM
Version 12 of the PostgreSQL database management system is out. "PostgreSQL 12 enhancements include notable improvements to query performance, particularly over larger data sets, and overall space utilization. This release provides application developers with new capabilities such as SQL/JSON path expression support, optimizations for how common table expression ('WITH') queries are executed, and generated columns. The PostgreSQL community continues to support the extensibility and robustness of PostgreSQL, with further additions to internationalization, authentication, and providing easier ways to administrate PostgreSQL. This release also introduces the pluggable table storage interface, which allows developers to create their own methods for storing data."

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for October 3, 2019

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 12:02:06 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for October 3, 2019 is available.

[$] Starting The Document Collective

Wednesday 2nd of October 2019 07:16:50 PM
The Document Foundation (TDF) is the home of the LibreOffice free-software office suite; it provides financial, governance, and other administrative services to LibreOffice. The foundation was established in part to ensure that commercial entities did not have undue influence on the project, which limited the types of activities in which it can engage. In particular, selling branded versions of LibreOffice in the macOS and Windows app stores has not been something that TDF could tackle. The TDF board of directors is looking to change that with the creation of a new entity, The Document Collective (TDC), to engage in commercial activity that is complementary to that of TDF members—hopefully as an income source to help support TDF.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 2nd of October 2019 02:38:07 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (openssl and openssl1.0), Fedora (expat, kernel, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, and phpMyAdmin), openSUSE (nghttp2 and u-boot), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (rh-nodejs8-nodejs), Slackware (libpcap), SUSE (bind, jasper, libgcrypt, openssl-1_0_0, and php7), and Ubuntu (clamav).

[$] PostgreSQL considers seccomp() filters

Tuesday 1st of October 2019 04:29:28 PM
A discussion on the pgsql-hackers mailing list at the end of August is another reminder that the suitability of seccomp() filters is likely more narrow than was hoped. Applying filters to the PostgreSQL database is difficult for a number of reasons and the benefit for the project and its users is not entirely clear. The discussion highlights the tradeoffs inherent in adding system-call filtering to a complex software suite; it may help crystallize the thinking of other projects that are also looking at supporting seccomp() filters.

Stable kernel updates

Tuesday 1st of October 2019 02:57:57 PM
Stable kernels 5.3.2, 5.2.18, and 4.19.76 have been released. They all contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 1st of October 2019 02:39:57 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (apache2, linux-4.9, netty, phpbb3, and poppler), openSUSE (chromium, djvulibre, ghostscript, python-numpy, SDL2, and varnish), Oracle (nodejs:10), Red Hat (httpd24-httpd and httpd24-nghttp2, kpatch-patch, and rh-nodejs10-nodejs), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-oem, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, and SDL 2.0).

TensorFlow 2.0.0

Monday 30th of September 2019 07:40:01 PM
Version 2.0.0 of the TensorFlow machine-learning system is out. Headline features include the "Keras" high-level API, support for distributed training, and more, including a number of API-breaking changes.

[$] 5.4 Merge window, part 2

Monday 30th of September 2019 07:34:27 PM
The release of the 5.4-rc1 kernel and the closing of the merge window for this development cycle came one day later than would have normally been expected. By that time, 12,554 non-merge changesets had been pulled into the mainline repository; that's nearly 2,900 since the first-week summary was written. That relatively small number of changes belies the amount of interesting change that arrived late in the merge window, though; read on for the full list.

The 5.4-rc1 kernel is out

Monday 30th of September 2019 07:33:14 PM
Linus has tagged the 5.4-rc1 release, thus ending the merge window for this development cycle. An apparent linux-kernel outage means that there is no announcement to post yet; we'll do that as soon as it becomes available. Meanwhile, though, everything can be seen in his repository.

Update: the 5.4-rc1 announcement is now available. "I didn't really extend the merge window by a day here, but I gave myself an extra day to merge my pending queue. Thus the Monday date for the rc1 rather than the usual Sunday afternoon."

Exim 4.92.3 security release

Monday 30th of September 2019 03:12:36 PM
Exim 4.92.3 has been released with a fix for CVE-2019-16928, a heap-based buffer overflow in string_vformat that could lead to remote code execution. "The currently known exploit uses a extraordinary long EHLO string to crash the Exim process that is receiving the message. While at this mode of operation Exim already dropped its privileges, other paths to reach the vulnerable code may exist."

Security updates for Monday

Monday 30th of September 2019 02:51:49 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (dovecot, kernel, and qemu-kvm), Debian (cimg, cups, e2fsprogs, exim4, file-roller, golang-1.11, httpie, and wpa), Fedora (curl, ghostscript, ibus, krb5, mod_md, and nbdkit), Mageia (chromium-browser-stable, libheif, and nghttp2), openSUSE (djvulibre, expat, libopenmpt, mosquitto, phpMyAdmin, and webkit2gtk3), Red Hat (nodejs:10), SUSE (gpg2), and Ubuntu (e2fsprogs and exim4).

[$] Compiling to BPF with GCC

Friday 27th of September 2019 09:15:28 PM
The addition of extended BPF to the kernel has opened up a whole range of use cases, but few developers actually write BPF code. It is, like any other assembly-level language, a tedious pain to work with; developers would rather use a higher-level language. For BPF, the language of choice is C, which is compiled to BPF with the LLVM compiler. But, as Jose Marchesi described during the Toolchains microconference at the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, LLVM will soon have company, as he has just added support for a BPF back-end to the GCC compiler.

RPM 4.15.0 released

Friday 27th of September 2019 09:14:50 PM
After "more than two years in development and half a year in testing", version 4.15.0 of the RPM package manager has been released. It has a wide range of new features, including faster parallel builds; support for %elif, %elifos, and %elifarch statements in RPM spec files; new %patchlist and %sourcelist sections; experimental support for non-privileged operation in a chroot() environment; and, of course, plenty of bug fixes and such. More details can be found in the release notes.

More in Tux Machines

Games: vkBasalt, Ikey Doherty, Crusader Kings II, Sunless Skies

  • vkBasalt, an open source Vulkan post processing layer for Contrast Adaptive Sharpening

    This is an interesting open source project! vkBasalt is a new Vulkan post processing layer that currently supports Contrast Adaptive Sharpening. Unlike Radeon Image Sharpening, vkBasalt supports Linux and works with both NVIDIA and AMD. This isn't entirely reinventing the wheel though, as it's partly based upon the ReShade port of AMD's CAS. Still, it's fun to see what hackers are able to do with little layers like this, especially when we don't have official support.

  • Ikey Doherty Launches Open-Source Focused Game/Software Development Company

    Well known open-source figure Ikey Doherty who rose to prominence for his work on the Solus Linux distribution and then went on to work on Intel's Clear Linux project is now having his hand at game engine development. Ikey shared with us that he left Intel back in May to begin his new adventure: Lispy Snake. Lispy Snake is a UK software development firm that at least initially is working on a game engine and games. Given Ikey's experience, the firm is focused on leveraging open-source technologies.

  • After making Crusader Kings II free, Paradox are now giving away The Old Gods expansion

    It's been a bit of a whirlwind of Paradox news recently and we have even more to share. With a tiny amount of effort, you can get The Old Gods expansion for Crusader Kings II free. This is after Crusader Kings II was set free to play and Crusader Kings III was announced just like I suggested it would be.

  • Failbetter Games are upgrading owners of Sunless Skies to the Sovereign Edition next year

    Failbetter Games have announced that Sunless Skies is getting a bit of an upgrade with the Sovereign Edition and it's going to be free to existing purchasers when it's release next year. Part of the reason, is that it will be releasing on Consoles so they're polishing the experience up some more. It's not just a special console edition though, it's coming with a bunch of new content and various improvements to the flow of it. To release on PC at the same time as Consoles, free for existing players.

What To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine

In this traditional article special for Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine you will find my suggestions and recommendations in 3 parts, work (including date/time adjustments, productivity tools), non-work (including extensions, podcasts, RSS, codecs), and system maintenance (including CPU-X, repository setup, auto-backup). I also have suggestion for you wanting Global Menu on this Eoan Ermine OS at the end. Adjust it once and use freely everyday. Finally, I hope Ubuntu 19.10 will be your best tool you could imagine to use without worry. Happy working! Read more

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Pylint: Making your Python code consistent

    Pylint is a higher-level Python style enforcer. While flake8 and black will take care of "local" style: where the newlines occur, how comments are formatted, or find issues like commented out code or bad practices in log formatting. Pylint is extremely aggressive by default. It will offer strong opinions on everything from checking if declared interfaces are actually implemented to opportunities to refactor duplicate code, which can be a lot to a new user. One way of introducing it gently to a project, or a team, is to start by turning all checkers off, and then enabling checkers one by one. This is especially useful if you already use flake8, black, and mypy: Pylint has quite a few checkers that overlap in functionality.

  • PyDev of the Week: Sophy Wong

    This week we welcome Sophy Wong (@sophywong) as our PyDev of the Week! Sophy is a maker who uses Circuit Python for creating wearables. She is also a writer and speaker at Maker events. You can see some of her creations on her Youtube Channel or her website. Let’s take a few moments to get to know her better!

  • Erik Marsja: Converting HTML to a Jupyter Notebook

    In this short post, we are going to learn how to turn the code from blog posts to Jupyter notebooks.

Proper Linux Screen Sharing Coming to Chromium & Electron Apps like Discord

A patch to add ‘screen enumeration’ to the Chromium browser is currently pending merge upstream. Once this fix is accepted Chromium and Chromium-based apps (like Discord) will finally support full screen sharing on Linux in a manner similar to that on Windows and macOS. Not being a multi-monitor user, or someone who shares their screen often, I wasn’t aware of this particular limitation until recently. So I’ll explain. Read more