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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 5 weeks 6 days ago

GStreamer 1.14 released

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 04:08:37 PM
The GStreamer team has announced a major feature release of the GStreamer cross-platform multimedia framework. Highlights include WebRTC support, experimental support for the next-gen royalty-free AV1 video codec, support for the Secure Reliable Transport (SRT) video streaming protocol, and much more. The release notes contain more details.

Six more companies adopt GPLv3 termination language

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 03:20:42 PM
Red Hat has announced that six more companies (CA Technologies, Cisco, HPE, Microsoft, SAP, and SUSE) have agreed to apply the GPLv3 termination conditions (wherein a violator's license is automatically restored if the problem is fixed in a timely manner) to GPLv2-licensed code. "GPL version 3 (GPLv3) introduced an approach to termination that offers distributors of the code an opportunity to correct errors and mistakes in license compliance. This approach allows for enforcement of license compliance consistent with a community in which heavy-handed approaches to enforcement, including for financial gain, are out of place."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 03:06:00 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (clamav, curl, lib32-curl, lib32-libcurl-compat, lib32-libcurl-gnutls, libcurl-compat, and libcurl-gnutls), openSUSE (various KMPs), Oracle (firefox), Scientific Linux (firefox), SUSE (java-1_7_1-ibm), and Ubuntu (memcached).

[$] Porting Fedora to RISC-V

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 01:02:10 AM

In my previous article, I gave an introduction to the open architecture of RISC-V. This article looks at how I and a small team of Fedora users ported a large part of the Fedora package set to RISC-V. It was a daunting task, especially when there is no real hardware or existing infrastructure, but we were able to get there in a part-time effort over a year and a half or so.

Subscribers can read on for a look at getting Fedora onto RISC-V by guest author Richard W.M. Jones.

[$] Super long-term kernel support

Monday 19th of March 2018 05:30:15 PM
Some years ago, prominent community leaders doubted that even short-term stable maintenance of kernel releases was feasible. More recently, selecting an occasional kernel for a two-year maintenance cycle has become routine, and some kernels, such as 3.2 under the care of Ben Hutchings, have received constant maintenance for as much as six years. But even that sort of extended maintenance is not enough for some use cases, as Yoshitake Kobayashi explained in his Embedded Linux Conference talk. To meet those needs, the Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) project is setting out to maintain releases for a minimum of 20 years.

Two stable kernels

Monday 19th of March 2018 03:12:18 PM
Stable kernels 4.15.11 and 4.14.28 have been released. They both contain many fixes throughout the tree and users should upgrade.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 19th of March 2018 03:05:57 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (firefox, libvorbis, and ntp), Debian (curl, firefox-esr, gitlab, libvorbis, libvorbisidec, openjdk-8, and uwsgi), Fedora (firefox, ImageMagick, kernel, and mailman), Gentoo (adobe-flash, jabberd2, oracle-jdk-bin, and plasma-workspace), Mageia (bugzilla, kernel, leptonica, libtiff, libvorbis, microcode, python-pycrypto, SDL_image, shadow-utils, sharutils, and xerces-c), openSUSE (exempi, firefox, GraphicsMagick, libid3tag, libraw, mariadb, php5, postgresql95, SDL2, SDL2_image, ucode-intel, and xmltooling), Red Hat (firefox), Slackware (firefox and libvorbis), SUSE (microcode_ctl and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (firefox and php5, php7.0, php7.1).

Kernel prepatch 4.16-rc6

Monday 19th of March 2018 01:28:08 PM
The 4.16-rc6 kernel prepatch is out. "Go test, things are stable and there's no reason to worry, but all the usual reasons to just do a quick build and verification that everything works for everybody. Ok?"

Some weekend stable kernels

Sunday 18th of March 2018 04:20:45 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has released the 4.9.88, 4.4.122, and 3.18.100 stable kernels. As usual, they contain fixes throughout the tree and users of those series should upgrade.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 16th of March 2018 03:07:44 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox), Debian (clamav and firefox-esr), openSUSE (Chromium and kernel-firmware), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (ceph), Scientific Linux (firefox), Slackware (curl), and SUSE (java-1_7_1-ibm and mariadb).

Malcolm: Usability improvements in GCC 8

Thursday 15th of March 2018 08:58:23 PM
Over on the Red Hat Developer Program blog, David Malcolm describes a number of usability improvements that he has made for the upcoming GCC 8 release. Malcolm has made a number of the C/C++ compiler error messages much more helpful, including adding hints for integrated development environments (IDEs) and other tools to suggest fixes for syntax and other kinds of errors. "[...] the code is fine, but, as is common with fragments of code seen on random websites, it’s missing #include directives. If you simply copy this into a new file and try to compile it as-is, it fails. This can be frustrating when copying and pasting examples – off the top of your head, which header files are needed by the above? – so for gcc 8 I’ve added hints telling you which header files are missing (for the most common cases)." He has various examples showing what the new error messages and hints look like in the blog post.

[$] The strange story of the ARM Meltdown-fix backport

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:55:17 PM
Alex Shi's posting of a patch series backporting a set of Meltdown fixes for the arm64 architecture to the 4.9 kernel might seem like a normal exercise in making important security fixes available on older kernels. But this case raised a couple of interesting questions about why this backport should be accepted into the long-term-support kernels — and a couple of equally interesting answers, one of which was rather better received than the other.

Stable kernels 4.15.10 and 4.14.27

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:54:46 PM

Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of the 4.15.10 and 4.14.27 stable kernels. Each contains a large number of patches throughout the kernel tree; users should upgrade.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:34:11 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (samba), CentOS (389-ds-base, kernel, libreoffice, mailman, and qemu-kvm), Debian (curl, libvirt, and mbedtls), Fedora (advancecomp, ceph, firefox, libldb, postgresql, python-django, and samba), Mageia (clamav, memcached, php, python-django, and zsh), openSUSE (adminer, firefox, java-1_7_0-openjdk, java-1_8_0-openjdk, and postgresql94), Oracle (kernel and libreoffice), Red Hat (erlang, firefox, flash-plugin, and java-1.7.1-ibm), Scientific Linux (389-ds-base, kernel, libreoffice, and qemu-kvm), SUSE (xen), and Ubuntu (curl, firefox, linux, linux-raspi2, and linux-hwe).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for March 15, 2018

Thursday 15th of March 2018 12:04:27 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for March 15, 2018 is available.

[$] Discussing PEP 572

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 08:36:59 PM

As is often the case, the python-ideas mailing list hosted a discussion about a Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP) recently. In some sense, this particular PEP was created to try to gather together the pros and cons of a feature idea that regularly crops up: statement-local bindings for variable names. But the discussion of the PEP went in enough different directions that it led to calls for an entirely different type of medium in which to have those kinds of discussions.

ACME v2 and Wildcard Certificate Support is Live

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 03:54:38 PM
Let's Encrypt has announced that ACMEv2 (Automated Certificate Management Environment) and wildcard certificate support is live. ACMEv2 is an updated version of the ACME protocol that has gone through the IETF standards process. Wildcard certificates allow you to secure all subdomains of a domain with a single certificate. (Thanks to Alphonse Ogulla)

GNOME 3.28 released

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 03:43:10 PM
GNOME 3.28 has been released. "This release brings a more beautiful font, an improved on-screen keyboard and a new 'Usage' application. Improvements to core GNOME applications include support for favorites in Files and the file chooser, a better month view in the Calendar, support for importing pictures from devices in Photos, and many more." See the release notes for details.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 03:24:11 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (calibre, dovecot, and postgresql), CentOS (dhcp and mailman), Fedora (freetype, kernel, leptonica, mariadb, mingw-leptonica, net-snmp, nx-libs, util-linux, wavpack, x2goserver, and zsh), Gentoo (chromium), Oracle (389-ds-base, mailman, and qemu-kvm), Red Hat (389-ds-base, kernel, kernel-alt, libreoffice, mailman, and qemu-kvm), Scientific Linux (mailman), Slackware (firefox and samba), and Ubuntu (samba).

[$] An introduction to RISC-V

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 02:34:46 PM

LWN has covered the open RISC-V ("risk five") processor architecture before, most recently in this article. As the ecosystem and tools around RISC-V have started coming together, a more detailed look is in order. In a series of two articles, guest author Richard W.M. Jones will look at what RISC-V is and follow up with an article on how we can now port Linux distributions to run on it.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • ‘Crush Them’: An Oral History of the Lawsuit That Upended Silicon Valley

    The then-23-year-old giant, which ruled the personal computer market with a despotic zeal, stood accused of using monopoly power to bully collaborators and squelch competitors. Its most famous victim was Netscape, the pioneering web browser, but everyone from Apple to American Airlines felt threatened by late-’90s Microsoft. The company was big enough to be crowned America’s most valuable firm, bold enough to compare attacks on its domain to Pearl Harbor, and, eventually, bad enough to be portrayed as a (semifictionalized) cadre of hypercapitalist murderers in a major motion picture. The “don’t be evil” optics that colored the rise of today’s tech giants (and have recently lost their efficacy) were a direct response to Microsoft’s tyrannical rule.

  • Michał Górny: Empty directories, *into, dodir, keepdir and tmpfiles.d
  • FRAMED Collection, a noir-styled spy adventure where you rearrange comic tiles is now out
    It's actually a compilation of FRAMED and FRAMED 2, games that have been widely praised and previously only available on mobile platforms. It has you moving around slices of an animated comic book, to put the noir-styled spy adventure story together. It actually sounds hilarious, as it's not a basic "this one has to go here" type of game, as it changes what happens based on where you put the tiles creating some amusing sounding failures:
  • Paradox’s grand strategy titles will be getting more content soon
    At their annual convention, Paradox Interactive have announced new expansions for their current grand strategy titles. There’s a little bit of everything for fans of these games.
  • Why OpenShift Is The New OpenStack For Red Hat
  • Help the Debian kernel team to help you
    I gave the first talk this morning at Mini-DebConf Hamburg, titled "Help the kernel team to help you". I briefly described several ways that Debian users and developers can make it easier (or harder) for us to deal with their requests. The slides are up in on my talks page, and video should be available soon.
  • UbuCon Europe 2018: Analysing a dream [English|Spanish]
    The idea of organising the Ubucon in Xixon, Asturies was set two years ago, while participating in the European Ubucon in Essen (germany). The Paris Ubucon took place and in those days we uderstood that there was a group enough of people with the capacities and the will to hold an European Congress for Ubuntu lovers. We had learnt a lot from German and French colleagues thanks to their respective amazing organizations and, at the same time, our handicap was the lack of s consolidated group in Spain.
  • 19-year-old Developer at the Forefront of TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
  • 19-years-old German developer Spearheads TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
    No doubt that Tron community is preparing for mainnet launch, with different ideas coming in from all roads. As part of its readiness, Tron has unveiled its Opensource Wallet DApp developed by 19-year old German developer, Marius Gill, who has been programming since 13 years old. The DApp is an outcome of Project Genesis, which was launched in March 2018 purposely to encourage TRON’s community engagement in bringing in new things into Tron ecosystem. The project provides a bonus pool of 2 billion dollars for active members around the world have lent their hands in implementing ideas for the community.
  • Collabora and GStreamer spring in Sweden
    Earlier this month, a few of us from Collabora, Olivier Crête, Nicolas Dufresne, George Kiagiadakis and I attended the GStreamer Spring Hackfest in Lund, Sweden. Hosted by Axis Communications (who uses GStreamer in their surveillance cameras for many years now), it was a great opportunity for the GStreamer community to touch base and work on open bugs and pet projects. [...] As for myself, I mainly worked on (or rather started to work on) split-field interlacing support in GStreamer, adding relevant formats and modes in the GStreamer video library. In addition, as a Meson developer (Nirbheek Chauhan) was present, I took the opportunity to discuss with him the last bit of porting build system of Geoclue to Meson, a side project I've been working on. It helped me get it done faster but also helped Nirbheek find some issues in Meson and fix them! All in all, my first GStreamer hackfest was an awesome experience (even though I was not feeling well). It was also very nice to hangout and socialize with old and new friends in the GStreamer community after a long time. Many thanks again to Axis for hosting us in their offices! See you at the GStreamer Conference this fall!
  • Reality Redrawn Opens At The Tech
    The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose was filled on Thursday with visitors experiencing new takes on the issue of fake news by artists using mixed reality, card games and even scratch and sniff cards. These installations were the results of Mozilla’ Reality Redrawn challenge. We launched the competition last December to make the power of misinformation and its potential impacts visible and visceral. Winners were announced in February.
  • Tangerine UI problems
    I've been a big fan of Tangerine for a while, it's a bank that doesn't charge fees and does what I need to do. They used to have a great app and website and then it all went a bit wrong. It's now a HTML app for Desktop and mobile. This isn't the fault of the tools used, but there's some terrible choices in the app across both. [...] The overall feel of the app is that its full of spinners, far too cluttered and just to confusing. Hey not everything I've built is perfect, but even I can spot some real problems with this app. I pretty sure Tangerine can do better than this. And yes, I'm writing this while drinking a beer I recently bought, as shown on my transaction page.
  • Majority of software plagued by vulnerabilities as open source adoption soars [Ed: More of Black Duck's FUD]
  • SiFive Releases 'Expansion Board' to Build Interest in RISC-V Processor
  • FreeBSD 11.2 Beta 2 Available For Testing, Brings PTI Optimization
    The second beta release of FreeBSD 11.2 is now available for weekend testing. FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 is now available with a variety of bug fixes, a fix to restore boot support for the Banana Pi ARM board, a context switch optimization for page table isolation (PTI), DTrace improvements, various build fixes, and a range of other system fixes.
  • Sony Is Working On AMD Ryzen LLVM Compiler Improvements - Possibly For The PlayStation 5
    One of Sony's compiler experts has taken to working on some tuning for the AMD Ryzen "znver1" microarchitecture support within the LLVM compiler stack. This begs the question why Sony is working on Ryzen improvements if not for a future product.
  • Popular YouTuber Says Apple Won't Fix His iMac Pro Damaged While Disassembled

    The damage resulted when they dropped the display while attempting to reattach it to the aluminum chassis. Towards the end of the video, Sebastian also says the iMac Pro requires a new logic board and power supply unit, suggesting there may have been a short circuit that caused damage to internal components as well.

  • Most dangerous new cyber security threats [iophk: "Windows TCO, yet neither Microsoft nor Windows get a mention"]

Steam Controller Kernel Driver Is Landing In The Linux 4.18 Kernel

The Linux 4.18 kernel will feature the initial Steam Controller kernel driver that works without having to use the Steam client or using third-party user-space applications like the SC-Controller application. A few months back we reported on a kernel driver being worked on for the Steam Controller by an independent user/developer outside of the gates of Valve. In part through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been working on this native Steam Controller Linux kernel driver that works for both USB cable and wireless modes of the Steam Controller and is a proper HID driver. Read more

Video of AsteroidOS

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.2.2 and 5.2.3. 5.2.2 was tagged 6 weeks ago, but we never managed to release it because we did not have the patience to fix the Windows installers in time due to a broken CI. Windows installers are provided for 5.2.3 again. We'll only provide source tarballs for 5.2.2 and we encourage everyone to just skip this release and use 5.2.3 which contains a few more bug fixes. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using KDevelop 5.2.1. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 19