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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 2 hours 22 min ago

[$] Darling: macOS compatibility for Linux

Tuesday 30th of July 2019 04:54:56 PM
There is an increasingly active development effort, known as Darling, that is aiming to provide a translation layer for macOS software on Linux; it is inspired in part by Wine. While Darling isn't nearly as mature as Wine, contributors are continuing to build out capabilities that could make the project more useful to a wider group of users in the future.

Subscribers can read on for a look at Darling from this week's edition.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 30th of July 2019 02:38:37 PM
Security updates have been issued by Fedora (cutter-re and radare2), Oracle (389-ds-base, httpd, kernel, libssh2, and qemu-kvm), Red Hat (389-ds-base, chromium-browser, curl, docker, httpd, keepalived, kernel, kernel-alt, kernel-rt, libssh2, perl, podman, procps-ng, qemu-kvm, qemu-kvm-ma, ruby, samba, and vim), Scientific Linux (389-ds-base, curl, libssh2, and qemu-kvm), SUSE (bzip2 and openexr), and Ubuntu (python-urllib3 and tmpreaper).

NumPy 1.17.0 released

Monday 29th of July 2019 05:20:38 PM
The NumPy team has announced the release of NumPy 1.17.0. NumPy is a fundamental package for scientific computing with Python. "The 1.17.0 release contains a number of new features that should substantially improve its performance and usefulness. The Python versions supported are 3.5-3.7, note that Python 2.7 has been dropped."

linux.conf.au proposal deadline extended

Monday 29th of July 2019 04:55:54 PM
For those didn't quite get around to putting in a proposal for linux.conf.au 2020 (Gold Coast, January 13 to 17), there's another chance: the proposal deadline has been extended to August 11. "We have heard that some of you would like a bit more time to submit your proposals for linux.conf.au 2020. So, we have decided to extend the due date by two weeks to help everyone have a chance to submit."

Security updates for Monday

Monday 29th of July 2019 02:17:50 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (patch, sdl-image1.2, and unzip), Fedora (deepin-clone, dtkcore, dtkwidget, and sqlite), Mageia (virtualbox), openSUSE (firefox), and SUSE (cronie and firefox).

Kernel prepatch 5.3-rc2

Sunday 28th of July 2019 08:29:36 PM
The 5.3-rc2 kernel prepatch is available for testing. "There are fixes all over, I don't think there's much of a pattern here. The three areas that do stand out are Documentation (more rst conversions), arch updates (mainly because of the netx arm platform removal) and misc driver fixes (gpu, iommu, net, nvdimm, sound ..)".

Some weekend stable kernel updates

Sunday 28th of July 2019 08:26:38 PM
The 5.2.4, 5.1.21, and 4.19.62 stable kernel updates have been released; each contains another set of important fixes. Note that 5.1.21 is the end of the line for the 5.1.x series.

GitHub starts blocking developers in countries facing US trade sanctions (ZDNet)

Saturday 27th of July 2019 02:46:34 PM
ZDNet reports on GitHub's blocking of users from Crimea and Iran. "As GitHub notes on its page about US trade controls, US sanctions apply to its online hosting service, GitHub.com, but its paid-for on-premise software -- aimed at enterprise users -- may be an option for users in those circumstances. It also claims to be in discussions with US regulators about how to rectify the situation."

[$] Completing the pidfd API

Friday 26th of July 2019 08:27:52 PM
Over the last few kernel releases, the kernel has gained the concept of a "pidfd" — a file descriptor that represents a process. What started as a way of sending signals to processes without race conditions has evolved into a more complete process-management interface. Now one of the last pieces is being put into place: the ability to wait for processes using pidfds. But, naturally, that API has had to go through some revisions first.

Stable kernels 5.2.3, 5.1.20, and 4.19.61

Friday 26th of July 2019 02:10:40 PM
Three new stable kernels have been released: 5.2.3, 5.1.20, and 4.19.61. These are rather larger updates than most and, as usual, contain fixes throughout the kernel tree; users should upgrade.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 26th of July 2019 01:28:53 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (libssh2 and patch), Fedora (kernel and kernel-headers), Mageia (vlc), Red Hat (rh-redis32-redis), SUSE (libgcrypt, libsolv, libzypp, zypper, and rmt-server), and Ubuntu (exim4, firefox, libebml, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, and vlc).

[$] Access to complex video devices with libcamera

Thursday 25th of July 2019 09:13:47 PM
Laurent Pinchart began his Open Source Summit Japan 2019 talk with a statement that, once upon a time, camera devices were simple pipelines that produced a sequence of video frames. Applications could control cameras using the Video4Linux (V4L) API by way of a single device node; there were "lots of knobs", but the overall task was straightforward. That situation has changed over the years, and application developers need more help; that is where the libcamera project comes in.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 25th of July 2019 02:55:10 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (java-1.7.0-openjdk, java-1.8.0-openjdk, and java-11-openjdk), Debian (exim4), Fedora (java-latest-openjdk), openSUSE (libsass, tomcat, and ucode-intel), Oracle (java-1.7.0-openjdk and thunderbird), SUSE (OpenEXR, spamassassin, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (ansible and patch).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for July 25, 2019

Thursday 25th of July 2019 01:34:16 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for July 25, 2019 is available.

[$] Python "standard" library

Wednesday 24th of July 2019 07:33:08 PM
Python is often mentioned in the same breath with the phrase "batteries included", which refers to the breadth of its standard library. But there is an effort underway to trim back the standard library by removing some unloved modules. In addition, there has been persistent talk of a major restructuring of the library, into a fairly minimal core as described in Amber Brown's talk at this year's Python Language Summit, or in other ways as discussed on the python-dev mailing list in January (though it has come up many times before that as well). A mid-July python-ideas mailing list thread picked up on some of that; it ended up showing, once again, that there is no real consensus on what the standard library is—or should be.

Introducing Fedora CoreOS

Wednesday 24th of July 2019 04:34:22 PM
Fedora Magazine covers the first preview release of Fedora CoreOS, a new Fedora edition built specifically for running containerized workloads. "It's the successor to both Fedora Atomic Host and CoreOS Container Linux. Fedora CoreOS combines the provisioning tools, automatic update model, and philosophy of Container Linux with the packaging technology, OCI support, and SELinux security of Atomic Host."

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 24th of July 2019 03:29:04 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (kernel, linux-4.9, and neovim), Fedora (slurm), openSUSE (ImageMagick, libgcrypt, libsass, live555, mumble, neovim, and teeworlds), Oracle (java-1.7.0-openjdk, java-1.8.0-openjdk, and java-11-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.7.0-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.7.0-openjdk), SUSE (glibc and openexr), and Ubuntu (mysql-5.7 and patch).

[$] Protecting update systems from nation-state attackers

Wednesday 24th of July 2019 02:56:12 PM
Frequent updates are a key part of keeping systems secure, but that goal will not be met if the update mechanism itself is compromised by an attacker. At a talk during the 2019 Open Source Summit Japan, Justin Cappos described Uptane, an update delivery mechanism for automotive applications that, he said, can prevent such problems, even when the attacker has the resources of a nation state. It would seem that some automobile manufacturers agree.

[$] Accessing zoned block devices with zonefs

Tuesday 23rd of July 2019 09:15:40 PM
Zoned block devices are quite different than the block devices most people are used to. The concept came from shingled magnetic recording (SMR) devices, which allow much higher density storage, but that extra capacity comes with a price: less flexibility. Zoned devices have regions (zones) that can only be written sequentially; there is no random access for writes to those zones. Linux already supports these devices, and filesystems are adding support as well, but some applications may want a simpler, more straightforward interface; that's what a new filesystem, zonefs, is targeting.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 23rd of July 2019 03:10:06 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (libsdl2-image and libxslt), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk and java-11-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk and java-11-openjdk), SUSE (bzip2, microcode_ctl, and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (clamav, evince, linux-hwe, linux-gcp, linux-snapdragon, and squid3).

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Voyager Live 10 overview | The spirit of open source in the heart of the digital world

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Voyager Live 10 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Cantor and the support for Jupyter notebooks at the finish line

    Hello everyone! It's been almost three weeks since my last post and this is going to be my my final post in this blog. So, I want to summarize all my work done in this GSoC project. Just to remember again, the goal of the project was to add the support for Jupiter notebooks to Cantor. This format is widely used in the scientific and education areas, mostly by the application Jupyter, and there is a lot of content available on the internet in this format (for example, here). By adding the support of this format in Cantor we’ll allow Cantor users access this content. This is short description, if you more intersted, you can found more details in my proporsal. [...] This is all for the limitations, I think. Let's talk about future plans and perspectives. In my opinion, this project has reached its initial goals, is finished now and will only need maintenance and support in terms of bug fixing and adjustment to potential format changes in future. When talking more generally, this project is part of the current overall development activities in Cantor to improve the usability and the stability of the application and to extend the feature set in order to enable more workflows and to reach to a bigger audience with this. See 19.08 and 18.12 release announcements to read more about the developments in the recent releases of Cantor. Support of the Jupyter notebook format is a big step into this direction but this not all. We have already many other items in our backlog like for the UX improvements, plots integration improvements going into this direction. Some of this items will be addressed soon. Some of them are something for the next GSoC project next year maybe? I think, that's all for now. Thank you for reading this blog and thank you for your interest in my project. Working on this project was a very interesting and pleasant period of my life. I am happy that I had this opportunity and was able to contribute to KDE and especially to Cantor with the support of my mentor Alexander Semke.

  • My Open-Source Activities from January to August 2019

    Debian is a general-purpose Linux distribution that is widely used on the planet. I am a Debian Developer who works on packages related to Android SDK and the Java ecosystem. I started a new package in an attempt to build the Android framework android.jar using the upstream build systems involving Ninja, Soong and others. Since the beginning we have been writing our own (very simple) makefiles to build the binaries in AOSP because their build logic tends to be simple and straightforward, until we worked on android.jar. Building it requires digging in so much code that it became incredibly hard to maintain, which is why we still haven’t brought in any newer version since android-framework-23. This is problematic as developers can’t build any apps that target Android 7+. After a month of work, this package is finally done. After all its dependencies are packaged in the future, it will be good to upload. This is where the students of Google Summer of Code (GSoC) come in!

  • iMars Black is an Inexpensive Bluetooth 5.0 USB Audio Transmitter & Receiver
  • This Linux computer plus router is the size of a ring box

    The VoCore2 Mini Linux Computer packs a wireless router and 16M of onboard storage into a cube about the size of a coin. Just hook it up to any display monitor through a standard USB2.0 port, and you're ready to put it to work. With 128MB of DDR2 memory and an MT7628AN MIPS processor, it's equally useful as a streaming station, VPN gateway, data storage - you name it.

  • Dive into the life and legacy of Alan Turing: 5 books and more

    Another well-known fact about Turing was his conviction for "gross indecency" because of his homosexuality, and the posthumous apology and pardon issued over more a half a decade after Turing’s death. But beyond all of this, who was Alan Turing? Here are six books that delve deeply into the life and legacy of Alan Turing. Collectively, these books cover his life, both professional and personal, and work others have done to build upon Turing’s ideas. Individually, or collectively, these works allow the reader to learn who Alan Turing was beyond just a few well-known, broad-stroke themes.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (cups, nginx, and openjdk-7), Fedora (httpd, mod_md, nghttp2, and patch), and SUSE (rubygem-loofah).

  • Epyc Encryption | TechSNAP 410

    It's CPU release season and we get excited about AMD's new line of server chips. Plus our take on AMD's approach to memory encryption, and our struggle to make sense of Intel's Comet Lake line. Also, a few Windows worms you should know about, the end of the road for EV certs, and an embarrassing new Bluetooth attack.

Android Leftovers

Xfce 4.14 Lands in Tumbleweed

Ahoy! openSUSE Xfce team is pleased to announce that the long awaited Xfce 4.14 has been released for Tumbleweed. After a long development cycle (4 years!), all of the core components and applications have been ported to GTK 3. Among the main new features and improvements, the xfwm4 window manager has finally gained support for VSync, HiDPI, hardware GLX and various compositor improvements. You can check out the neat new features in the official Xfce 4.14 tour and the official release announcement. Read more

today's howtos