Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LWN

Syndicate content
LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 5 weeks 6 days ago

[$] Designing ELF modules

Tuesday 13th of March 2018 08:26:24 PM
The bpfilter proposal posted in February included a new type of kernel module that would run as a user-space program; its purpose is to parse and translate iptables rules under the kernel's control but in a contained, non-kernel setting. These "ELF modules" were reposted for review as a standalone patch set in early March. That review has happened; it is a good example of how community involvement can improve a special-purpose patch and turn it into a more generally useful feature.

An important Samba 4 security release

Tuesday 13th of March 2018 06:33:39 PM
Anybody running Samba 4 servers probably wants to take a look at this alert and upgrade their systems. "CVE-2018-1057: On a Samba 4 AD DC the LDAP server in all versions of Samba from 4.0.0 onwards incorrectly validates permissions to modify passwords over LDAP allowing authenticated users to change any other users' passwords, including administrative users."

Numerous vulnerabilities in AMD processors

Tuesday 13th of March 2018 06:30:27 PM
A company called CTS has disclosed a long series of vulnerabilities in AMD processors. "The chipset is a central component on Ryzen and Ryzen Pro workstations: it links the processor with hardware devices such as WiFi and network cards, making it an ideal target for malicious actors. The Ryzen chipset is currently being shipped with exploitable backdoors that could let attackers inject malicious code into the chip, providing them with a safe haven to operate from." See the associated white paper for more details.

Update: there are a lot of questions circulating about the actual severity of these vulnerabilities and the motivations of the people reporting them. It may not be time to panic quite yet.

Firefox 59 released

Tuesday 13th of March 2018 05:38:09 PM
Mozilla has released Firefox 59, the next iteration of Firefox Quantum. From the release notes: "On Firefox for desktop, we’ve improved page load times, added tools to annotate and crop your Firefox Screenshots, and made it easier to arrange your Top Sites on the Firefox Home page. On Firefox for Android, we’ve added support for sites that stream video using the HLS protocol."

[$] JupyterLab: ready for users

Tuesday 13th of March 2018 02:54:58 PM

In the recent article about Jupyter and its notebooks, we mentioned that a new interface, called JupyterLab, existed in what its developers described as an "early preview" stage. About two weeks after that article appeared, Project Jupyter made a significant announcement: JupyterLab is "ready for users". Users will find a more integrated environment for scientific computation that is also more easily extended. JupyterLab takes the Jupyter Notebook to a level of functionality that will propel it well into the next decade—and beyond.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 13th of March 2018 02:49:23 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (samba), Fedora (tor), openSUSE (glibc, mysql-connector-java, and shadow), Oracle (dhcp), Red Hat (bind, chromium-browser, and dhcp), Scientific Linux (dhcp), and SUSE (java-1_7_0-openjdk, java-1_8_0-ibm, and java-1_8_0-openjdk).

[$] Variable-length arrays and the max() mess

Monday 12th of March 2018 09:37:50 PM
Variable-length arrays (VLAs) have a non-constant size that is determined (and which can vary) at run time; they are supported by the ISO C99 standard. Use of VLAs in the kernel has long been discouraged but not prohibited, so there are naturally numerous VLA instances to be found. A recent push to remove VLAs from the kernel entirely has gained momentum, but it ran into an interesting snag on the way.

More in Tux Machines

More on Tesla's Compliance

10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more