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Syndicate content is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 5 hours 34 min ago

Stone: A new era for Linux's low-level graphics - Part 1

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 07:17:03 PM
Daniel Stone begins a series on how the Linux graphic stack has improved in recent times. "This has made mainline Linux much more attractive: the exact same generic codebases of GNOME and Weston that I'm using to write this blog post on an Intel laptop run equally well on AMD workstations, low-power NXP boards destined for in-flight entertainment, and high-end Renesas SoCs which might well be in your car. Now that the drivers are easy to write, and applications are portable, we've seen over ten new DRM drivers merged to the upstream kernel since atomic modesetting was merged."

[$] Two perspectives on the maintainer relationship

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 06:40:41 PM
Developers and maintainers of free-software projects are drawn from the same pool of people, and maintainers in one project are often developers in another, but there is still a certain amount of friction between the two groups. Maintainers depend on developers to contribute changes, but the two groups have a different set of incentives when it comes to reviewing and accepting those changes. Two talks at the 2018 Embedded Linux Conference shed some light on this relationship and how it can be made to work more smoothly.

GStreamer 1.14 released

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 04:08:37 PM
The GStreamer team has announced a major feature release of the GStreamer cross-platform multimedia framework. Highlights include WebRTC support, experimental support for the next-gen royalty-free AV1 video codec, support for the Secure Reliable Transport (SRT) video streaming protocol, and much more. The release notes contain more details.

Six more companies adopt GPLv3 termination language

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 03:20:42 PM
Red Hat has announced that six more companies (CA Technologies, Cisco, HPE, Microsoft, SAP, and SUSE) have agreed to apply the GPLv3 termination conditions (wherein a violator's license is automatically restored if the problem is fixed in a timely manner) to GPLv2-licensed code. "GPL version 3 (GPLv3) introduced an approach to termination that offers distributors of the code an opportunity to correct errors and mistakes in license compliance. This approach allows for enforcement of license compliance consistent with a community in which heavy-handed approaches to enforcement, including for financial gain, are out of place."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 03:06:00 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (clamav, curl, lib32-curl, lib32-libcurl-compat, lib32-libcurl-gnutls, libcurl-compat, and libcurl-gnutls), openSUSE (various KMPs), Oracle (firefox), Scientific Linux (firefox), SUSE (java-1_7_1-ibm), and Ubuntu (memcached).

[$] Porting Fedora to RISC-V

Tuesday 20th of March 2018 01:02:10 AM

In my previous article, I gave an introduction to the open architecture of RISC-V. This article looks at how I and a small team of Fedora users ported a large part of the Fedora package set to RISC-V. It was a daunting task, especially when there is no real hardware or existing infrastructure, but we were able to get there in a part-time effort over a year and a half or so.

Subscribers can read on for a look at getting Fedora onto RISC-V by guest author Richard W.M. Jones.

[$] Super long-term kernel support

Monday 19th of March 2018 05:30:15 PM
Some years ago, prominent community leaders doubted that even short-term stable maintenance of kernel releases was feasible. More recently, selecting an occasional kernel for a two-year maintenance cycle has become routine, and some kernels, such as 3.2 under the care of Ben Hutchings, have received constant maintenance for as much as six years. But even that sort of extended maintenance is not enough for some use cases, as Yoshitake Kobayashi explained in his Embedded Linux Conference talk. To meet those needs, the Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) project is setting out to maintain releases for a minimum of 20 years.

Two stable kernels

Monday 19th of March 2018 03:12:18 PM
Stable kernels 4.15.11 and 4.14.28 have been released. They both contain many fixes throughout the tree and users should upgrade.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 19th of March 2018 03:05:57 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (firefox, libvorbis, and ntp), Debian (curl, firefox-esr, gitlab, libvorbis, libvorbisidec, openjdk-8, and uwsgi), Fedora (firefox, ImageMagick, kernel, and mailman), Gentoo (adobe-flash, jabberd2, oracle-jdk-bin, and plasma-workspace), Mageia (bugzilla, kernel, leptonica, libtiff, libvorbis, microcode, python-pycrypto, SDL_image, shadow-utils, sharutils, and xerces-c), openSUSE (exempi, firefox, GraphicsMagick, libid3tag, libraw, mariadb, php5, postgresql95, SDL2, SDL2_image, ucode-intel, and xmltooling), Red Hat (firefox), Slackware (firefox and libvorbis), SUSE (microcode_ctl and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (firefox and php5, php7.0, php7.1).

Kernel prepatch 4.16-rc6

Monday 19th of March 2018 01:28:08 PM
The 4.16-rc6 kernel prepatch is out. "Go test, things are stable and there's no reason to worry, but all the usual reasons to just do a quick build and verification that everything works for everybody. Ok?"

Some weekend stable kernels

Sunday 18th of March 2018 04:20:45 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has released the 4.9.88, 4.4.122, and 3.18.100 stable kernels. As usual, they contain fixes throughout the tree and users of those series should upgrade.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 16th of March 2018 03:07:44 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox), Debian (clamav and firefox-esr), openSUSE (Chromium and kernel-firmware), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (ceph), Scientific Linux (firefox), Slackware (curl), and SUSE (java-1_7_1-ibm and mariadb).

Malcolm: Usability improvements in GCC 8

Thursday 15th of March 2018 08:58:23 PM
Over on the Red Hat Developer Program blog, David Malcolm describes a number of usability improvements that he has made for the upcoming GCC 8 release. Malcolm has made a number of the C/C++ compiler error messages much more helpful, including adding hints for integrated development environments (IDEs) and other tools to suggest fixes for syntax and other kinds of errors. "[...] the code is fine, but, as is common with fragments of code seen on random websites, it’s missing #include directives. If you simply copy this into a new file and try to compile it as-is, it fails. This can be frustrating when copying and pasting examples – off the top of your head, which header files are needed by the above? – so for gcc 8 I’ve added hints telling you which header files are missing (for the most common cases)." He has various examples showing what the new error messages and hints look like in the blog post.

[$] The strange story of the ARM Meltdown-fix backport

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:55:17 PM
Alex Shi's posting of a patch series backporting a set of Meltdown fixes for the arm64 architecture to the 4.9 kernel might seem like a normal exercise in making important security fixes available on older kernels. But this case raised a couple of interesting questions about why this backport should be accepted into the long-term-support kernels — and a couple of equally interesting answers, one of which was rather better received than the other.

Stable kernels 4.15.10 and 4.14.27

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:54:46 PM

Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of the 4.15.10 and 4.14.27 stable kernels. Each contains a large number of patches throughout the kernel tree; users should upgrade.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 15th of March 2018 04:34:11 PM
Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (samba), CentOS (389-ds-base, kernel, libreoffice, mailman, and qemu-kvm), Debian (curl, libvirt, and mbedtls), Fedora (advancecomp, ceph, firefox, libldb, postgresql, python-django, and samba), Mageia (clamav, memcached, php, python-django, and zsh), openSUSE (adminer, firefox, java-1_7_0-openjdk, java-1_8_0-openjdk, and postgresql94), Oracle (kernel and libreoffice), Red Hat (erlang, firefox, flash-plugin, and java-1.7.1-ibm), Scientific Linux (389-ds-base, kernel, libreoffice, and qemu-kvm), SUSE (xen), and Ubuntu (curl, firefox, linux, linux-raspi2, and linux-hwe).

[$] Weekly Edition for March 15, 2018

Thursday 15th of March 2018 12:04:27 AM
The Weekly Edition for March 15, 2018 is available.

[$] Discussing PEP 572

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 08:36:59 PM

As is often the case, the python-ideas mailing list hosted a discussion about a Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP) recently. In some sense, this particular PEP was created to try to gather together the pros and cons of a feature idea that regularly crops up: statement-local bindings for variable names. But the discussion of the PEP went in enough different directions that it led to calls for an entirely different type of medium in which to have those kinds of discussions.

ACME v2 and Wildcard Certificate Support is Live

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 03:54:38 PM
Let's Encrypt has announced that ACMEv2 (Automated Certificate Management Environment) and wildcard certificate support is live. ACMEv2 is an updated version of the ACME protocol that has gone through the IETF standards process. Wildcard certificates allow you to secure all subdomains of a domain with a single certificate. (Thanks to Alphonse Ogulla)

GNOME 3.28 released

Wednesday 14th of March 2018 03:43:10 PM
GNOME 3.28 has been released. "This release brings a more beautiful font, an improved on-screen keyboard and a new 'Usage' application. Improvements to core GNOME applications include support for favorites in Files and the file chooser, a better month view in the Calendar, support for importing pictures from devices in Photos, and many more." See the release notes for details.

More in Tux Machines

GNOME: GitLab Migration and More

  • IMPORTANT: GitLab mass migration plan
    I know some fellows doesn’t read desktop-devel-list, so let me share here an email that it’s important for all to read: We have put in place the plan for the mass migration to GitLab and the steps maintainers needs to do.
  • ED Update – week 11
  • Reflections on Distractions in Work, Productivity and Time Usage
    For the past year or so I have mostly worked at home or remote in my daily life. Currently I’m engaged in my master thesis and need to manage my daily time and energy to work on it. It is no surprise to many of us that working using your internet-connected personal computer at home can make you prone to many distractions. However, managing your own time is not just about whipping and self-discipline. It is about setting yourself up in a structure which rewards you for hard work and gives your mind the breaks it needs. Based on reflections and experimentation with many scheduling systems and tools I finally felt I have achieved a set of principles I really like and that’s what I’ll be sharing with you today. [...] Minimizing shell notifications: While I don’t have the same big hammer to “block access to my e-mail” here, I decided to change the order of my e-mail inboxes in Geary so my more relevant (and far less activity prone) student e-mail inbox appears first. I also turned off the background e-mail daemon and turned off notification banners in GNOME Shell. [...] Lastly, I want to give two additional tips. If you like listening to music while working, consider whether it might affect your productivity. For example, I found music with vocals to be distracting me if I try to immerse myself in reading difficult litterature. I can really recommend Doctor Turtle’s acoustic instrumental music while working though (all free). Secondly, I find that different types of tasks requires different postures. For abstract, high-level or vaguely formulated tasks (fx formulating goals, reviewing something or reflecting), I find interacting with the computer whilst standing up and walking around to really help gather my thoughts. On the other hand with practical tasks or tasks which require immersion (fx programming tasks), I find sitting down to be much more comfortable.

OSS, Openwashing and FUD

Open Data (OD) for Research of Shootings

Security Leftovers

  • 7 Questions to Ask About Your DevSecOps Program
  • Developers Are Ethical But Not Responsible?
    Ask a person if he or she is a racist and the answer is almost always no. Ask a developer if they consider ethical considerations when writing code and only six percent say no. If everyone acted the way they self-report, then there would be peace and love throughout the world. Based on over a hundred thousand respondents, StackOverflow’s Developer Survey 2018 presents a more complicated reality. If they were asked to write code for an unethical purpose, 59 percent would say no, but another 37 percent of developers were non-committal about whether they would comply. In another question, only about 5 percent said they definitely not report unethical problems with code. But sounding the alarm is about as far as most people will go.
  • Cloud Security: 10 Top Tips
  • Group Policy Objects (GPOs) for Linux®