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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 1 hour 26 min ago

[$] Time namespaces

5 hours 7 min ago
The kernel's namespace abstraction allows different groups of processes to have different views of the system. This feature is most often used with containers; it allows each container to have its own view of the set of running processes, the network environment, the filesystem hierarchy, and more. One aspect of the system that remains universal, though, is the concept of the system time. The recently posted time namespace patch set (from Dmitry Safonov with a lot of work by Andrei Vagin) seeks to change that.

Mir 1.0 released

5 hours 17 min ago
The Ubuntu blog has announced the release of version 1.0.0 of the Mir display server. "Whether for building a device or for writing a shell for the desktop, Mir can give you a graphics stack that is fast, light, and secure. The Mir graphical stack works across different graphics platforms and driver models and is easy to integrate into your kiosk, digital signage, or purpose built graphical solution. It was first conceived over 6 years ago as part of an initiative by Canonical to unify the graphical environment across all devices, including desktop, TV, and mobile devices and continues to be developed with new features and modern standards."

Security updates for Friday

10 hours 32 min ago
Security updates have been issued by Debian (hylafax, sympa, and texlive-bin), Fedora (curl and gitolite3), Mageia (bouncycastle, ghostscript, and libx11), openSUSE (webkit2gtk3), Oracle (spice and spice-gtk and spice-gtk and spice-server), Red Hat (rubygem-smart_proxy_dynflow, spice and spice-gtk, and spice-gtk and spice-server), Scientific Linux (spice and spice-gtk and spice-gtk and spice-server), and SUSE (ImageMagick, kernel, liblouis, openslp, and python-paramiko).

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 20th of September 2018 02:16:38 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (glusterfs, php5, reportbug, and suricata), openSUSE (chromium and exempi), Red Hat (openstack-rabbitmq-container), SUSE (couchdb, crowbar, crowbar-core, crowbar-ha, crowbar-init, crowbar-openstack, crowbar-ui, gdm, OpenStack, pango, and webkit2gtk3), and Ubuntu (bind9, lcms, lcms2, and lcms2).

After Years of Abusive E-mails, the Creator of Linux Steps Aside (The New Yorker)

Thursday 20th of September 2018 02:10:56 AM
A story in The New Yorker magazine may help explain some of the timing of the recent upheavals in kernel-land. Longtime followers of kernel development will find the article to be a mixed bag—over the top in spots, fairly accurate elsewhere. "Torvalds’s decision to step aside came after The New Yorker asked him a series of questions about his conduct for a story on complaints about his abusive behavior discouraging women from working as Linux-kernel programmers. In a response to The New Yorker, Torvalds said, 'I am very proud of the Linux code that I invented and the impact it has had on the world. I am not, however, always proud of my inability to communicate well with others—this is a lifelong struggle for me. To anyone whose feelings I have hurt, I am deeply sorry.'"

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 20, 2018

Thursday 20th of September 2018 12:30:38 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 20, 2018 is available.

Stable kernel updates

Wednesday 19th of September 2018 10:14:48 PM
Stable kernels 4.18.9, 4.14.71, 4.9.128, and 4.4.157 have been released. They all contain the usual set of important fixes and users should upgrade.

[$] Project Treble

Wednesday 19th of September 2018 07:33:45 PM

Android's Project Treble is meant as a way to reduce the fragmentation in the Android ecosystem. It also makes porting Android 8 ("Oreo"—the first version to mandate Treble) more difficult, according to Fedor Tcymbal. He described the project and what it means for silicon and device vendors in a talk at Open Source Summit North America 2018 in Vancouver, Canada.

[$] Resource control at Facebook

Wednesday 19th of September 2018 04:39:48 PM

Facebook runs a lot of programs and it tries to pack as many as it can onto each machine. That means running close to—and sometimes beyond—the resource limits on any given machine. How the system reacts when, for example, memory is exhausted, makes a big difference in Facebook getting its work done. Tejun Heo came to 2018 Open Source Summit North America to describe the resource control work that has been done by the team he works on at Facebook.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 19th of September 2018 02:48:40 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (chromium-browser and libapache2-mod-perl2), Oracle (kernel), and Ubuntu (ghostscript, glib2.0, and php5).

LLVM 7.0.0 released

Wednesday 19th of September 2018 12:56:26 PM
Version 7.0.0 of the LLVM compiler suite is out. "It is the result of the community's work over the past six months, including: function multiversioning in Clang with the 'target' attribute for ELF-based x86/x86_64 targets, improved PCH support in clang-cl, preliminary DWARF v5 support, basic support for OpenMP 4.5 offloading to NVPTX, OpenCL C++ support, MSan, X-Ray and libFuzzer support for FreeBSD, early UBSan, X-Ray and libFuzzer support for OpenBSD, UBSan checks for implicit conversions, many long-tail compatibility issues fixed in lld which is now production ready for ELF, COFF and MinGW, new tools llvm-exegesis, llvm-mca and diagtool". The list of new features is long; see the overall release notes, the Clang release notes, the Clang tools release notes, and the LLD linker release notes for more information.

[$] Code, conflict, and conduct

Tuesday 18th of September 2018 09:15:45 PM
A couple of surprising things happened in the kernel community on September 16: Linus Torvalds announced that he was taking a break from kernel development to focus on improving his own behavior, and the longstanding "code of conflict" was replaced with a code of conduct based on the Contributor Covenant. Those two things did not quite come packaged as a set, but they are clearly not unrelated. It is a time of change for the kernel project; there will be challenges to overcome but, in the end, less may change than many expect or fear.

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 18th of September 2018 03:09:27 PM
Security updates have been issued by Fedora (ghostscript, icu, nspr, nss, nss-softokn, nss-util, and okular), Red Hat (java-1.7.1-ibm, java-1.8.0-ibm, OpenStack Platform, openstack-neutron, and openstack-nova), and Ubuntu (clamav and php5, php7.0, php7.2).

PostgreSQL adopts a code of conduct

Tuesday 18th of September 2018 02:04:55 PM
The PostgreSQL community has, after an extended discussion, announced the adoption of a code of conduct "which is intended to ensure that PostgreSQL remains an open and enjoyable project for anyone to join and participate in".

Versity announces next generation open source archiving filesystem

Monday 17th of September 2018 11:15:08 PM
Versity Software has announced that it has released ScoutFS under GPLv2. "ScoutFS is the first GPL archiving file system ever released, creating an inherently safer and more user friendly option for storing archival data where accessibility over very large time scales, and the removal of vendor specific risk is a key consideration."

Security updates for Monday

Monday 17th of September 2018 02:46:07 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (discount, ghostscript, intel-microcode, mbedtls, thunderbird, and zutils), Fedora (ghostscript, java-1.8.0-openjdk-aarch32, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, libzypp, matrix-synapse, nspr, nss, nss-softokn, nss-util, zsh, and zypper), Mageia (kernel, kernel-linus, and kernel-tmb), openSUSE (chromium, curl, ffmpeg-4, GraphicsMagick, kernel, libzypp, zypper, okular, python3, spice-gtk, tomcat, and zsh), Oracle (kernel), Slackware (php), SUSE (curl, libzypp, zypper, and openssh-openssl1), and Ubuntu (curl and firefox).

Apache SpamAssassin 3.4.2 released

Monday 17th of September 2018 01:30:23 PM
SpamAssassin 3.4.2 is out, the first release from this spam-filtering project since 3.4.1 came out in April 2015. It fixes some remotely exploitable security issues, so SpamAssassin users probably want to update in the near future. "The exploit has been seen in the wild but not believe to have been purposefully part of a Denial of Service attempt.  We are concerned that there may be attempts to abuse the vulnerability in the future.  Therefore, we strongly recommend all users of these versions upgrade to Apache SpamAssassin 3.4.2 as soon as possible."

[$] Fedora reawakens the hibernation debate

Monday 17th of September 2018 12:52:20 PM
Behavioral changes can make desktop users grumpy; that is doubly true for changes that arrive without notice and possibly risk data loss. Such a situation recently arose in the Fedora 29 development branch in the form of a new "suspend-then-hibernate" feature. This feature will almost certainly be turned off before Fedora 29 reaches an official release, but the discussion and finger-pointing it inspired reveal some significant differences of opinion about how this kind of change should be managed.

Kernel prepatch 4.19-rc4; Linus taking a break

Sunday 16th of September 2018 10:06:03 PM
Linus has released 4.19-rc4 and made a set of announcements that should really be read in their entirety. "I actually think that 4.19 is looking fairly good, things have gotten to the 'calm' period of the release cycle, and I've talked to Greg to ask him if he'd mind finishing up 4.19 for me, so that I can take a break, and try to at least fix my own behavior."

Weekend stable kernel updates

Sunday 16th of September 2018 11:38:50 AM
The 4.18.8, 4.14.70, 4.9.127, and 4.4.156 stable kernels have been released. Each contains a relatively large set of important fixes and updates.

More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay
    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July. These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches. I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw). [...] Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector). I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information. Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end). Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll. Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability. You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Foundation for Sale

  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]
    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?” Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals. In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.