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Latest distribution releases
Updated: 1 hour 33 min ago

02/03 SmartOS 20180203

Friday 9th of February 2018 10:58:04 PM

02/08 Enso 0.2.1

Friday 9th of February 2018 02:58:05 PM

02/03 SystemRescueCd 5.2.0

Thursday 8th of February 2018 08:58:04 PM

02/02 Elive 2.9.26

Thursday 8th of February 2018 08:58:04 PM

02/02 AUSTRUMI 3.7.7

Wednesday 7th of February 2018 02:58:06 PM

02/01 SwagArch 18.02

Tuesday 6th of February 2018 08:58:02 AM

02/01 Arch 2018.02.01

Monday 5th of February 2018 04:58:03 PM

02/01 Black Lab 11.52

Sunday 4th of February 2018 02:58:03 AM

02/01 4MLinux 23.3

Sunday 4th of February 2018 12:58:02 AM

02/01 Absolute 15.0-beta3

Saturday 3rd of February 2018 06:58:03 PM

01/31 Qubes 4.0-rc4

Saturday 3rd of February 2018 04:58:03 PM

01/31 openSUSE 15.0-beta

Saturday 3rd of February 2018 02:58:02 PM

01/30 Lite 3.8

Saturday 3rd of February 2018 08:58:03 AM

01/29 Emmabuntüs 9-1.01

Friday 2nd of February 2018 12:58:03 PM

01/29 OPNsense 18.1

Friday 2nd of February 2018 12:58:03 PM

01/29 Q4OS 3.1-testing

Thursday 1st of February 2018 10:58:03 PM

01/28 Parrot 3.11

Thursday 1st of February 2018 08:58:03 PM

01/28 Redcore 1801

Thursday 1st of February 2018 06:58:05 PM

01/28 DietPi 6.0

Thursday 1st of February 2018 02:58:03 PM

01/27 Nitrux 1.0.8

Thursday 1st of February 2018 02:58:03 PM

More in Tux Machines

Review: DietPi 6.1

DietPi makes it extremely easy to turn a single board computer into many different things. Installing and configuring Nextcloud, Kodi, etc., only require a few very basic steps. Every software package I tried installed with few issues, and worked great once installed. DietPi does almost all the hard work for the user, which makes it a great option for running on any single board computer or as a virtual machine. If you are looking for a lightweight and easy-to-use operating system for your single board computer, you cannot go wrong with DietPi. Read more

Google, Windows and Outlook

  • Google's Octopus Is A Gemini Lake Chromebook
    While we're still waiting on an AMD-powered Chromebook as well as for Cannonlake to materialize, it appears Google is prepping support for a Geminilake Chromebook as well. Gemini Lake was launched back in December and makes use of Goldmont Plus CPU cores with Gen9 (Kabylake) class graphics. The current Gemini Lake mobile parts are the Celeron N4000/N4100 and Pentium Silver N5000. The Celeron models are dual core while the Pentium Silver N5000 is quad-core, all of them have a 6 Watt TDP, 1.1GHz base frequency, and turbo frequency in the 2.4~2.7GHz range while the graphics clock up only to 650~750MHz.
  • Windows 10 Update KB4058043 Causing BSODs, Some PCs Unable to Boot
    Botched updates keep making the rounds these days, and here’s a new one that was actually released in December, but whose effects haven’t been spotted until this month. Windows 10 update KB4058043, which is released to systems running the Fall Creators Update, brings reliability improvements to the Microsoft Store and fixes an issue which Microsoft says could cause app update failures and unnecessary network requests. But as it turns out, it also brings new problems to a number of systems installing it. A post on Microsoft’s Community forums, which got pinned earlier this week – meaning that it’s really an issue that all users should be aware of, reveals that Windows 10 update KB4058043 caused BSODs on a system before eventually pushing it to an unbootable state.
  • A Life Lesson in Mishandling SMTP Sender Verification

    Whenever I encounter incredibly stupid and functionally destructive configuration errors like this I tend to believe they're down to simple incompetence and not malice.

    But this one has me wondering. If you essentially require incoming mail to include the contents of spf.outlook.com (currently no less than 81 subnets) as valid senders for the domain, you are essentially saying that only outlook.com customers are allowed to communicate.

    If that restriction is a result of a deliberate choice rather than a simple configuration error, the problem moves out of the technical sphere and could conceivably become a legal matter, depending on what outlook.com have specified in their contracts that they are selling to their customers.

Graphics: Nouveau, Mesa and VESA

  • Nouveau Gets ARB_bindless_texture Support For Maxwell & Newer
    Back for Mesa 18.0 there was OpenGL bindless textures for Kepler GPUs on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver while now for Mesa 18.1 that support is in place for Maxwell GPUs and newer. Bindless texture support is important for "AZDO" purposes for approaching zero driver overhead with OpenGL. ARB_bindless_texture reduces the API/GL driver overhead of resource bindings and allows accessing textures without needing to first bind/re-bind them.
  • Marek Working Towards Even Lower SGPR Register Usage
    Yesterday well known open-source AMD developer Marek Olšák landed his RadeonSI 32-bit pointers support for freeing up some scalar general purpose registers (SGPRs) and he's continued with a new patch series to alleviate register usage even more.
  • Libdrm 2.4.90 Released With Meson Build System, AMDGPU & Intel Improvements
    Marek Olšák on Saturday released the big libdrm 2.4.90 DRM library update that sits between Mesa and other GPU user-space components and the kernel's Direct Rendering Manager code.
  • Mesa Git Lands RadeonSI 32-bit Pointers Support
    At the start of the new year Marek Olšák of AMD posted a set of patches for 32-bit GPU pointers in RadeonSI. That work has now landed in mainline Mesa Git.
  • xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0
    Nothing terribly exciting, but enough bug fixes to justify a release.
  • VESA X.Org Driver Sees First Update In Three Years
    Should you find yourself using the xf86-video-vesa DDX for one reason or another, a new release is now available and it's the first in three years. The xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0 X.Org driver was released this week with the handful of commits that came in since v2.3.4 was tagged three years ago, it's been eight years already since xf86-video-vesa 2.3.0. For most users, xf86-video-vesa is just used in select fallback instances when your main DDX driver fails but even still these days KMS is pretty solid with xf86-video-modesetting, fbdev and other DDX drivers working well, etc.

Kernel: VGA_Switcheroo, Con Kolivas/MuQSS, and KPTI Protection