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Updated: 18 min 41 sec ago

How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi

6 hours 42 sec ago
If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.read more

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

7 hours 55 min ago
Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers.

Five Things Tech Companies Can Do Better

Monday 22nd of May 2017 06:27:17 AM
In the past three months, I've heard a lot of people talking about what they think tech companies can or should do in order to protect women and minorities and anyone who experiences unlawful treatment like harassment, discrimination, or retaliation. Most of the discussion has centered around promoting diversity and inclusion, which is fantastic and important, but, I believe, slightly misses the point.

The state of car infotainment: Forget horsepower, we want megahertz!

Monday 22nd of May 2017 03:04:02 AM
Linux, Android, and Blackberry's QNX race for control of car infotainment systems.

Intel’s “Euclid” robot module on sale for $399

Monday 22nd of May 2017 01:09:40 AM
Intel has launched its “Euclid” robotics compute module, which runs Ubuntu on an Atom x7-Z8700, and offers a RealSense 3D cam, WiFi, and sensors. When Intel demonstrated its Intel Euclid robotics controller at last August’s Intel Developer Conference, the company gave no indication of its release date or even if it would be more than […]

ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements

Sunday 21st of May 2017 11:15:18 PM
The development team behind ReactOS, an open source project attempting to create a free computer operating system that's 100% compatible with Windows binaries, announced the release of ReactOS 0.4.5.

Compact, rugged Apollo Lake SBC has swappable SATA

Sunday 21st of May 2017 09:20:56 PM
Axiomtek’s tough, Linux-ready “eBOX100-312-FL” embedded computer offers a Celeron N3350 SoC, a SATA bay, and 2x mini-PCIe, HDMI, GbE, and USB 3.0 ports. The fanless, 216 x 137.65 x 44mm eBOX100-312-FL is not quite as compact as Axiomtek’s similarly rugged, Bay Trail Atom based eBOX620-841-FL and eBOX625-841-FL computers. Yet, it offers benefits such as a […]

OpenShot 2.3.3 Open-Source Video Editor Released with Stability Improvements

Sunday 21st of May 2017 07:26:34 PM
OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas is announcing the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform non-linear video editor.

Arduino shows off LoRa gateway and node shields

Sunday 21st of May 2017 05:32:12 PM
Arduino is prepping a “LoRa Gateway Kit” to bring LoRa wireless to its Linux-driven Arduino Tian, plus a “LoRa Node Kit” for the Arduino Primo. At the Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino and Semtech, the semiconductor company that developed the LoRa wireless standard, showed off some LoRa gateway and node shields that run on Arduino […]

Submitting Your First Patch to the Linux Kernel and Responding to Feedback

Sunday 21st of May 2017 03:37:50 PM
After working on the Linux kernel for Nexus and Pixel phones for nearly a year, and messing around with the excellent Eudyptula challenge, I finally wanted to take a crack at submitting patches upstream to the Linux kernel. I figure I’d document my workflow, now that I’ve gotten a few patches accepted...

Lubuntu Vs. Xubuntu

Sunday 21st of May 2017 01:43:28 PM
?Over the years, Lubuntu and Xubuntu have been two popular flavors that have provided an alternative to a lot of folks who have preferred something other than vanilla Ubuntu with the Unity desktop. Lubuntu and Xubuntu have been the choice of Linux enthusiasts and users who would rather have a lean or lightweight Linux distro or one that will provide the best performance on an old desktop or laptop. But how do these two distros compare, which one would I recommend and why? Let’s read along as I weigh the strengths and weaknesses of these two awesome Ubuntu flavors.

This Week in Open Source News: Google Fuchsia Pros s Steady Linux Embrace & More

Sunday 21st of May 2017 11:49:06 AM
This week in OSS & Linux news, Jack Wallen shares a rundown of Google Fuchsia features and how they affect Android, Microsoft can no longer ignore Linux in the data center, & more! Read on to stay open-source-informed!

Wine Staging 2.8 Improves Support for Star Wars: The Old Republic, StarCraft

Sunday 21st of May 2017 09:54:44 AM
The Wine Staging team announced the release of version 2.8 of the open-source compatibility layer for running Windows programs on top of Linux-based operating systems.

Arduino Cinque board taps SiFive RISC-V SoC and an ESP32 wireless chip

Sunday 21st of May 2017 08:00:22 AM
SiFive and Arduino unveiled a wireless-enabled “Arduino Cinque” board based on SiFive’s HiFive, featuring a RISC-V FE310 SoC and an ESP32 wireless SoC. At the Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino joined with fabless RISC-V semiconductor firm SiFive to announce the first Arduino branded board using the open source RISC-V CPU architecture.

Pinebook (or any arm64) - Linux Mega.nz Howto

Sunday 21st of May 2017 06:06:00 AM
As I wrote before, Pinebook is a very interesting machine.....The not very developed arm64 architecture brings a lot of challenges to everyone working on it when it comes to have software for it. I wanted to exchange some files as easy as I do in all my machines, phones, tablets, etc. However there was nothing available in arm architecture, such as Dropbox, Ubuntu One as far as I see is no longer available, so I had to be creative, and I managed to find that mega had a binary for Raspbian, so from here it was a learning process...

IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot

Sunday 21st of May 2017 04:11:38 AM
Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.read more

You Can Now Install Microsoft's Visual Studio Code IDE as a Snap on Ubuntu Linux

Sunday 21st of May 2017 02:17:16 AM
After informing Ubuntu Linux users about the fact that it's possible to install GitHub's Atom hackable text editor as a Snap, Canonical's David Callé is now announcing the availability of Microsoft's Visual Studio Code IDE as a Snap.

NHS mulling Ubuntu switch after Windows XP fail?

Sunday 21st of May 2017 12:22:54 AM
The NHS could be considering switching its software infrastructure from Windows to Ubuntu, after Windows XP vulnerabilities were exploited in the recent cyber attack that crippled the National Health Service. Or is it just an elaborate gag?

5 reasons the D programming language is a great choice for development

Saturday 20th of May 2017 10:28:32 PM
The D programming language is a statically typed, general purpose programming language with C-like syntax that compiles to native code. It's a good fit in open source software development for many reasons; here are some of them.read more

How to Kill a Process from the Command Line

Saturday 20th of May 2017 08:34:10 PM
Picture this: You’ve launched an application (be it from your favorite desktop menu or from the command line) and you start using that launched app, only to have it lock up on you, stop performing, or unexpectedly die. You try to run the app again, but it turns out the original never truly shut down completely.

More in Tux Machines

ROSA Fresh R9

ROSA is a desktop distribution that was originally forked from Mandriva Linux, but now is independently developed. While the company which produces ROSA is based in Russia, the distribution includes complete translations for multiple languages. The ROSA desktop distribution is designed to be easy to use and includes a range of popular applications and multimedia support. ROSA R9 is available in two editions, one featuring the KDE 4 desktop and the second featuring the KDE Plasma 5 desktop. These editions are scheduled to receive four years of support and security updates. I decided to download the Plasma edition of ROSA R9 and found the installation media to be approximately 2GB in size. Booting from the ROSA disc brings up a menu asking if we would like to load the distribution's live desktop environment or begin the installation process. Taking the live option brings up a graphical wizard that asks us a few questions. We are asked to select our preferred language from a list and accept the project's warranty and license. We are then asked to select our time zone and keyboard layout from lists. With these steps completed, the wizard disappears and the Plasma 5.9 desktop loads. Read more

More of today's howtos

Software: Linfo, EasyTag, Simple Scan, Albert, VLC, Remote Desktop, Frogr, Brisk Menu, and OpenShot

  • Linfo – Shows Linux Server Health Status in Real-Time
    Linfo is a free and open source, cross-platform server statistics UI/library which displays a great deal of system information. It is extensible, easy-to-use (via composer) PHP5 library to get extensive system statistics programmatically from your PHP application. It’s a Ncurses CLI view of Web UI, which works in Linux, Windows, *BSD, Darwin/Mac OSX, Solaris, and Minix.
  • 2 tag management tools for organizing your music library
    These days, EasyTag seems to be my go-to tag editor. While I can't claim to have tried them all, I have mostly stopped looking now that I have this one. Generally speaking, I like its three-panel layout: file system directory on the left; selected tracks in the middle, showing file name and tags; and specific tags and cover image on the right.
  • New Simple Scan Designs Emerge; Seeking Devs to Implement Them
    Simple Scan is one of my personal favourite and perhaps even one of the "essential" apps on the Linux desktop for me. It does what it says on the tin: it's simple and it scans, with a nice preview system and enough options to be decently functional. Some new designs for the app have emerged and they are looking quite nice indeed. GNOME UX designer and Red Hat Desktop Team Member, Allan Day, showed the new mockup designs off in his blog post. Simple Scan has a pretty sparse and simplistic interface already, and I mean that in a positive way, but Allan believes that "just because it's great, doesn't mean it can't be improved" and that most of the improvements are simply "refinements", rather than major overhauls, in order to make some of the app's functions a bit easier to discover and navigate.
  • Albert – A Fast, Lightweight and Flexible Application Launcher for Linux
    A while ago, we have written about Ulauncher which is used to launch application quickly. Today we came up with similar kind of utility called Albert which is doing the same job and have some additional unique features which is not there in ulauncher.
  • 5 Tricks To Get More Out Of VLC Player In Linux
    In fact, for the desktop, VLC is much more than just a tool to play videos stored on your hard drive! So, stay with me for a tour of the lesser known features of that great software.
  • 5 of the Best Linux Remote Desktop Apps to Remotely Access a Computer
    Remote desktop apps are a very useful group of apps because they allow access to a computer anywhere in the world. While the simplest way to do this is via a terminal, if you don’t want to have to type commands but rather want a more advanced way to access a remote computer, here are five of the best remote desktop apps for Linux.
  • Frogr 1.3 released
  • Brisk Menu 0.4.0 Is Out with Super Key Support, Adapts to Vertical Panel Layouts
    Solus Project founder and lead developer Ikey Doherty is today announcing the release and immediate availability of the Brisk Menu 0.4.0 application menu for Solus and other supported GNU/Linux distributions.
  • OpenShot 2.3.3 Open-Source Video Editor Released with Stability Improvements
    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas is announcing the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform non-linear video editor.

CloudReady - Chromebook re-experienced

I haven't done any extensive testing, but then, how much testing is really needed to run a bunch of Web apps. The whole idea is to have this cloud-based operating system, with easy, flexible access to your data anywhere you go. So if you judge this from the perspective of a typical desktop, you miss the point. But that is the point. When I install something on a desktop-like form factor, I expect its behavior to match. CloudReady takes you away from that experience, and the transition is not comfortable. You feel very limited. This makes a lot of sense for schools, for instance, where you do want to lock down the devices, and make them simple for reuse. In a home setup, why would you go for just cloud, when you can have that plus any which desktop application on a typical system? After all, nothing prevents you from launching a browser and using Google applications, side by side with your desktop stuff. It's the same thing. The notion of reviving old hardware is a bit of a wishful thinking. My eeePC test shows that it gets completely crippled when you run HD content in either Firefox or Chrome. An operating system based on Chromium OS will not drastically change that. It cannot do that. Maybe you will have better performance than having Windows there, the same way I opted for a Linux setup on the Asus netbook, but there are physical limits to what old hardware can accomplish. And then, there's the whole question of cloud ... Most people might be comfy with this, after having used smartphones for a while, but I don't think this is anything novel or mindblowing. CloudReady works as advertised, it's a very cool concept, but ultimately, it gives you a browser on steroids. Google and Neverware have their own agenda for doing this, but for home users, there really isn't any added value in transforming their keyboard-and-mouse box into a browsing portal. So if you ask me, am I ready for the cloud, the answer is, only when it becomes sophisticated enough to match my productivity and freedom of creativity. And for you, do you want a simple, locked down, secure and entirely Google machine that isn't a mobile phone or a dedicated piece of hardware? The answer is 42. Read more