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Linux and Open Source news headlines
Updated: 37 min 49 sec ago

Code ninjas earn "belts" with CoderDojo

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 02:50:02 PM
In 2014, the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics predicted that the IT industry in the US would grow by 18% before 2022; in software development, the increases ranged from 8% to 20%, depending on the type of development work. Rationally, we should expect that the trend won't just end in 2020; as our world becomes more and more connected, we move toward a global economy that is powered by information.read more

Intel unveils its 6th Gen Core processors

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 01:52:51 PM
Intel debuted its 6th Gen Core (Skylake) processors, ranging from 4.5 Watt TDP SoCs with internal I/O hubs, to 45+ Watt honkers with external I/O hub chips. Intel bills the 6th Gen Intel Core as its “most scalable processor family ever.” After more than four years of development, Intel’s “Skylake” architecture is now breathing life into 48 processors organized in four sets — Y-series, U-series, H-series, and S-series — and ranging from 4.5 to 91 Watt TDPs.

Is Microsoft Enterprise Mobility a Trojan Horse?

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 12:55:40 PM
Although some have been trying to sound the alarm, many of us have been lulled into complacency brought by a belief that Microsoft is no longer a real threat and that we are now free to concentrate all of our energies on growing Linux and FOSS, which is basically all we’ve wanted to do.

GTK+ 3.17.8 Adds Even More Improvements to Wayland, Prepares for GNOME 3.18

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 11:58:29 AM
While the GNOME Project prepares for the release of the second Beta build of the forthcoming GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, due for release on September 23, the GTK+ development team announced the release of GTK+ 3.17.8.

ChaletOS, New & Beautiful Linux Distribution Based On Xubuntu And A Clone Of Windows

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 11:01:18 AM
Now when Linux is becoming more & more popular among non-Linux users, there is a Linux distribution dedicated for such users who are blank about Linux. ChaletOS is a new, sleek & beautiful operating system that is very much Like modern Windows. ChaletOS aims for making ease in learning Linux, taking away from complexities for new users. Personally I think about their aim, "Great!". Let's take a look at this new & sleek Linux distro.

SanDisk and Nexenta release open-source, flash software-defined storage array

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 10:04:07 AM
What do you get when you put open-source software and flash drives together? The first open-source software-defined storage array.

Apple v. Samsung is headed toward an incredible fourth jury trial

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 09:06:56 AM
In March or April of 2016, yet another jury will be summoned to federal court in San Jose to weigh in on the long-running dispute between the world's two biggest smartphone companies.

Canonical Invites App Developers to Test Its Next Generation Ubuntu SDK

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 08:09:45 AM
Canonical's Zoltán Balogh published a very interesting article for all Ubuntu Touch and Ubuntu Phone app developers, informing them about the upcoming, next-generation version of the Ubuntu SDK software.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Enters Beta Improving Container Support

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 07:12:34 AM
Red Hat is out today with a beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. (RHEL), providing users with an early preview of new features set to become generally available later this year.

Google Patches Critical Vulnerabilities in Chrome 45

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 06:15:23 AM
Tuesday turned out to be a busy day for browser makers. The three major vendors in the space-Google; Mozilla; and Microsoft-joined arms and announced their intent to stop support for the weakened RC4 encryption algorithm starting early next year. Google, having already announced it would pause Flash-based ads in Chrome yesterday, pushed through version 45 of the browser, patching 29 security vulnerabilities in the process.

Ubuntu Snappy Core Runs on Banana Pi BPI-M2 with Linux Kernel 4.1.6, Download Now

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 05:18:12 AM
The guys and gals from the Banana Pi project announced earlier today that they've managed to make the Ubuntu Snappy Core operating system from Canonical run on the Banana Pi BPI-M2 single-board computer.

How to stitch photos into a panorama with Hugin Panorama Creator on Linux

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 04:21:01 AM
Almost every modern digital camera offers the ability of “on the fly” panorama creation, but often you will find the result of this automated process not to meet expectations. For this reason, it's best to take the sequence of photos as individual continuous images and then you use some kind of software tool to stitch them together in a proper way.

The True Internet of Things

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 03:23:50 AM
Before the Internet there were just nets, and they didn't get along. Each was a country or a city-state of its own, with hard boundaries that could not be crossed[he]mdash[/he]or could be crossed only if the owners of the networks created closed and silo'd ways of doing it.

Alliance for Open Media will develop a royalty-free video codec

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 02:26:39 AM
Seven leading Internet companies today announced formation of the Alliance for Open Media – an open-source project that will develop next-generation media formats, codecs and technologies in the public interest. The Alliance’s founding members are Amazon, Cisco, Google, Intel Corporation, Microsoft, Mozilla and Netflix.

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Will be Powered by Linux Kernel 4.2

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 01:29:28 AM
The Ubuntu Kernel Team at Canonical had their regular meeting on September 1, announcing the rebasing of Ubuntu 15.10's development kernel packages, the master-next branch, on the recently released Linux 4.2 kernel.

Rackspace developer advocate on getting started with open source

Thursday 3rd of September 2015 12:32:17 AM
Don Schenck is a Rackspace developer advocate, meaning he writes code, writes about code, speaks at conferences, teaches workshops, and helps customers. Prior to Rackspace, Don worked across a broad range of industries, from developing systems to reduce civilian casualties in military engagements to building software to control machines that cut and bend reinforcing steel.read more

Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter

Wednesday 2nd of September 2015 11:35:06 PM
no, not really. Still this graph is a better starting point to discuss these issues than certain slogans. And also proves something important about Open Data

We did it ourselves: The open organization in education

Wednesday 2nd of September 2015 10:37:55 PM
Reading The Open Organization was exciting because author Jim Whitehurst catalyzed many ideas that I've had swimming in my consciousness. Jim says that his role at Red Hat is more of a catalyst than a CEO in the traditional sense of how we use the word. The open organization is less about CEOs and more about community building and empowerment. His approach reminds me of ancient wisdom found in the Tao te Ching:read more

Hello, Columbus: Ohio LinuxFest Up Next Oct. 2-3

Wednesday 2nd of September 2015 09:40:44 PM
The 13th annual Ohio LinuxFest will be held Oct. 2-3 at the Greater Columbus Convention Center in downtown Columbus. Hosting authoritative speakers in a large expo hall, the OLF welcomes all free and open source software professionals, enthusiasts, and everyone interested in learning more about free and open source software.

Acer offers convertible Chromebook for $299

Wednesday 2nd of September 2015 08:43:33 PM
In today's open source roundup: The Acer Chromebook R11 offers tablet and laptop functionality for $299. Plus: Acer announces Predator 8 gaming tablet. And Google announces Android Wear for the iPhone.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu Derivatives

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

  • Why Does the Government Use Open Source Code?
  • Twitter open-sources Diffy, a tool for automatically spotting bugs in code
    Twitter is today announcing the availability of Diffy, a new piece of open-source software that developers can use to spot bugs when they’re making updates to certain parts of code. Twitter uses the code internally. Now the social networking company is releasing it to the rest of the world.
  • We wrote an open source bank parser
    Our first project is something I was already working on, an extensible parser to chew bank statements and shit out transaction sheets. We made a gem, made an API and learnt a lot in the process. (We even wrote a java API to unlock pdf files given a password. Whew!). We currently have a meager three bank support, but we've managed to build a framework that makes it super easy to add other banks and statement formats.
  • Google Patches Critical Vulnerabilities in Chrome 45
  • Chrome Browser Nearing 30 Percent Market Share [Ed: Calling Microsoft-connected firm “a prominent Web analytics company”]
    It's no secret that Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox--both open source browsers--were locked in a neck-and-neck market share battle for a long time. The two browsers have remained on rapid release cycles, and for years they tended to leapfrog each other for market share in small increments each month.
  • FossaMail Open-Source Mail Client Launches Update
    FossaMail is built on the Mozilla Thunderbird client but without all the will-they-or-won’t-they of the rumors that Mozilla has done with Thunderbird. Even better, FossaMail is compatible with both Windows and Linux, while offering a 64-bit download in Windows to up the speed, address more memory, and perform other 64-bit operations. At the same time, FossaMail looks and feels just like Thunderbird, despite the oval tab fiasco. It still offers a contacts list, calendar, and chat, just like most users have come to expect from their email platforms. It’s so close to Thunderbird, in fact, that the developers didn’t bother with an extensive tutorial or FAQ, but instead just point users to the Thunderbird help section if they have any problems.
  • Proprietary vs. open source WCM [Ed: pro-proprietary]
    As it turns out, open source software is not always so free, proprietary software is not necessarily closed, and help from the open source community isn’t nearly as comprehensive as the level of support you get from a professional vendor.
  • Releases 1.19.1 of Tioga and 0.13.1 of ctioga2
  • ORNL Building Efficiency Software Available as Open Source Code
  • Autotune Code from ORNL Tunes Your Building Energy Efficiency
  • ORNL Offers Automated Calibration Software for Building Efficiency Studies as Open Source Code
  • Book cover for the Free Culture book finally done
    Creating a good looking book cover proved harder than I expected. I wanted to create a cover looking similar to the original cover of the Free Culture book we are translating to Norwegian, and I wanted it in vector format for high resolution printing. But my inkscape knowledge were not nearly good enough to pull that off.
  • Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter
    goes against one of the arguments used more frequently to promote Free Software (which, in and by itself, is intrinsically weak, and therefore not used as the main one by the most experts) that is licensing costs. The graph clearly show that such costs (the leftmost column) are only a small part of the total. From left to right the columns show “software license costs”, “immaterial goods” (whatever that means…), “software acquisition and development”, “litigation and other legal expenses” (as much as licenses..), “software assistance and maintenance”
  • M$’s Licensing Costs Are Only The Tip Of The Iceberg Of IT – Look Below
  • There’s still a chance to save WiFi
    You may not know it, but wifi is under assault in the USA due to proposed FCC regulations about modifications to devices with modular radios. In short, it would make it illegal for vendors to sell devices with firmware that users can replace. This is of concern to everyone, because Wifi routers are notoriously buggy and insecure. It is also of special concern to amateur radio hobbyists, due to the use of these devices in the Amateur Radio Service (FCC Part 97).