Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LXer

Syndicate content
Linux and Open Source news headlines
Updated: 1 hour 14 min ago

Sub-1GHz IoT gateway combines BB Black and TI LaunchPad boards

Tuesday 9th of January 2018 01:16:13 AM
Newark Element14’s “SimpleLink Sub-1GHz Sensor to Cloud Linux Industrial Gateway” kit combines a BeagleBone Black, a wireless cape, and a pair of TI SimpleLink CC1350 LanchPad kits. Newark Element14’s “SimpleLink Sub-1GHz Sensor to Cloud Linux Industrial Gateway” kit provides a Sub-1GHz sensor network development platform with an Internet of Things (IoT) gateway and cloud connectivity. […]

How to install or upgrade PHP version to PHP 7

Tuesday 9th of January 2018 12:01:53 AM
PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor) is a widely used open source scripting language that is used mainly for web development. It is used generally for creating dynamic web pages or for dynamic images on websites. In...

How to Install Mautic Marketing Automation Tool on CentOS 7

Monday 8th of January 2018 10:47:33 PM
In this tutorial, I will show you step-by-step how to install Mautic Marketing Automation Platform on CentOS 7. Mautic is an open source and self-hosted marketing automation tool for everyone. It allows you to grow up your business, monitor your website, create landing pages, create campaigns for your business, manage contacts, and send marketing emails.

WP Engine Gets $250 Million Funding from Silver Lake

Monday 8th of January 2018 09:33:13 PM
It might be called the little engine that could -- or maybe the little engine that does. Whatever you call it, Austin, Texas based WP Engine web hosting company just got a big payoff with a $250 million investment from the private equity giant Silver Lake partners.

5 arcade-style games for Linux

Monday 8th of January 2018 07:58:14 PM
Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games often are not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.read more

You GNOME it: Windows and Apple devs get a compelling reason to turn to Linux

Monday 8th of January 2018 06:43:54 PM
Add in Flatpak/Snap and it could be a revolutionOpen Source Insider The biggest open source story of 2017 was unquestionably Canonical's decision to stop developing its Unity desktop and move Ubuntu to the GNOME Shell desktop.…

What I See for LJ 2.0: in a Word, Community

Monday 8th of January 2018 05:29:33 PM
It has been too long, but I was at least one of the founders of the SeattleUNIX User's Group. I remember the first meeting well. It took place atSeattle University, and our guest speaker was Bill Joy. He impressed me inthat he had a huge pile of overhead transparencies (remember, this was inthe 1980s), asked a few questions of the group, selected some of them andstarted talking.

SuperTux: A Linux Take on Super Mario Game

Monday 8th of January 2018 04:15:13 PM
When people usually think of PC games, they think of big titles, like Call of Duty, which often cost millions of dollars to create. While those games may be enjoyable, there are many games created by amateur programmers that are just as fun.

What cryptographic key generation needs is a good source of entrophy

Monday 8th of January 2018 03:00:53 PM
Imagine you're about to play a board game that involves using dice, say Monopoly, Yahtzee, Cluedo, Dungeons & Dragons...1 In most cases, at least where you're interested in playing a fair game, you want to be pretty sure that there's a random distribution of the dice-roll results. In other words, for a six-sided dice, you'd hope that, for each roll, there's an equal chance that any of the numbers one through six will appear.read more

Spectre and Meltdown explained

Monday 8th of January 2018 01:46:33 PM
By now, most of you have probably already heard of the biggest disaster in the history of IT – Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities which affect all modern CPUs, from those in desktops and servers, to ones found in smartphones. Unfortunately, there’s much confusion about the level of threat we’re dealing with here, because some of the impacted vendors need reasons to explain the still-missing security patches. But even those who did release a patch, avoid mentioning that it only partially addresses the threat. And, there’s no good explanation of these vulnerabilities on the right level (not for developers), something that just about anyone working in IT could understand to make their own conclusion. So, I decided to give it a shot and deliver just that.

Weekend tech reading: Spectre/Meltdown recap, 400Gbps Ethernet, next-gen DisplayPort

Monday 8th of January 2018 09:33:29 AM
How a researcher hacked his own computer and found 'worst' chip flaw Daniel Gruss didn't sleep much the night he hacked his own computer and exposed a flaw in most of the chips made in the past two decades by hardware giant Intel Corp...

Top 5: Best of 2017, the future of DevOps, and more

Monday 8th of January 2018 07:10:32 AM
This week we look at five ways open source can strengthen your job search, the best open source tutorials of 2017, and more.read more

Linux Kernel 4.15 to Arrive in Two Weeks as Linus Torvalds Releases Seventh RC

Monday 8th of January 2018 04:47:34 AM
Linus Torvalds just announced a few moments ago the release and immediate availability for download of the seventh RC (Release Candidate) milestone of the upcoming Linux 4.15 kernel series.

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of TrueOS A Unix Based OS

Monday 8th of January 2018 02:24:37 AM
Trust me, the name TrueOS takes me back to 1990s when Tru64 UNIX operating system made its presence. TrueOS is PC-BSD’s new unified brand built upon FreeBSD-CURRENT code base. Note that TrueOS is not a Linux distro but is BSD Unix.

Emacs for Science

Monday 8th of January 2018 12:30:15 AM
I typically cover software packages that do actual calculations toadvance scientific knowledge, but here I'm exploring a slightlystranger tool in the arsenal ofscientific computation.

Install JENKINS on CentOS/RHEL 7

Sunday 7th of January 2018 10:35:53 PM
With the rise of Devops culture, IT industries have changed for good. Organizations have been adopting devops resources, tools for increasing the productivity. Automation tools are gaining more and more importance & one such...

5 ways open source can strengthen your job search

Sunday 7th of January 2018 08:41:31 PM
Are you searching for a job in the bustling tech industry? Whether you're a seasoned member of the tech community looking for a new challenge or a recent graduate looking for your first job, contributing to open source projects can be a great way to boost your attractiveness as a candidate. Below are five ways your work on open source projects may strengthen your job hunt.read more

Creating a YUM repository from ISO & Online repo

Sunday 7th of January 2018 06:47:09 PM
YUM tool is one of the most important tool for Centos/RHEL/Fedora. Though in latest builds of fedora, it has been replaced with DNF but that not at all means that it has ran its...

A school in India defies the traditional education model

Sunday 7th of January 2018 04:52:47 PM
Located in a sleepy village just two hours away from the bustling metropolis of Mumbai is a school that defies traditional educational models by collaboratively owning, building, and sharing knowledge and technology. The school uses only open source software and hardware in its approach to learning, and takes pride in the fact that none of its students have used or even seen proprietary software, including the ubiquitous Windows operating system.

Pros and cons of Linux

Sunday 7th of January 2018 02:58:25 PM
Windows today beats almost all the markets thanks to its simplicity and large number of programs and games in a free access. We are used to Windows since there are no compatible systems like Windows. However, it is not true. Unfortunately, most people are creatures of habit that's why it will take years for the Linux to take its place among the users.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Initial Retpoline Support Added To LLVM For Spectre v2 Mitigation
    The LLVM code has been merged to mainline for the Retpoline x86 mitigation technique for Spectre Variant 2. This will be back-ported to LLVM 6.0 and also LLVM 5.0 with an immediate point release expected to get this patched compiler out in the wild. The compiler-side work -- similar to GCC's Retpoline code -- is to avoid generating code where an indirect branch could have its prediction poisoned by a rogue actor. The Retpoline support uses indirect calls in a non-speculatable way.
  • Teen Hacker Who Social Engineered His Way Into Top-Level US Government Officials' Accounts Pleads Guilty To Ten Charges
    The teenage hacker who tore CIA director John Brennan a new AOL-hole is awaiting sentencing in the UK. Kane Gamble, the apparent founder of hacker collective Crackas With Attitude, was able to access classified documents Brennan has forwarded to his personal email account by posing as a Verizon tech. Social engineering is still the best hacking tool. It's something anyone anywhere can do. If you do it well, a whole host of supposedly-secured information can be had, thanks to multiple entities relying on the same personal identifiers to "verify" the social engineer they're talking to is the person who owns accounts they're granting access to. Despite claiming he was motivated by American injustices perpetrated around the world (Palestine is namechecked in the teen's multiple mini-manifestos), a lot of what Gamble participated in was plain, old fashioned harassment.
  • The Guardian view on cyberwar: an urgent problem [Ed: Lists several attacks by Microsoft Windows (but names neither)]
    The first known, and perhaps the most successful of these, was the joint US/Israeli Stuxnet attack on the Iranian nuclear programme in 2009. Since then there has been increasing evidence of attacks of this sort by Russia – against Estonia in 2009, and then against Ukraine, where tens of thousands of attacks on everything from power supplies to voting machines have opened an under-reported front in an under-reported war. Across the Baltic, the Swedish government has just announced a beefed-up programme of civil defence, of which the most substantial part will be an attempt to protect its software and networks from attacks. Meanwhile, North Korean state hackers are blamed by western intelligence services for the WannaCry ransomware attacks which last year shut down several NHS hospitals in the UK. Persistent reports suggest the US has interfered in this way with North Korea’s nuclear missile programme.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #143
  • Don’t Install Meltdown And Spectre Patches, Intel Warns It Would Increase System Reebots
  • On that Spectre mitigations discussion
    By now, almost everybody has probably seen the press coverage of Linus Torvalds's remarks about one of the patches addressing Spectre variant 2. Less noted, but much more informative, is David Woodhouse's response on why those patches are the way they are.

Tails 3.5 Anonymous OS Released to Mitigate Spectre Vulnerability for AMD CPUs

Tails, the open-source Linux-based operating system designed to protect user's privacy while surfing the Internet, also known as Anonymous OS, was updated today to version 3.5. Coming only two weeks after the Tails 3.4 release, which included patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities publicly disclosed earlier this month, today's Tails 3.5 update is here to bump the Linux kernel to version 4.14.13 and include the microcode firmware for AMD CPUs to mitigate the Spectre flaw. Read more

Graphics: Freedreno, Gallium3D, AMDGPU, RadeonSI, Mesa

  • Code Aurora Working On Adreno 6xx Support For Freedreno
    The Qualcomm-aligned Code Aurora is working on supporting the latest-generation Adreno A6xx graphics hardware with the open-source Freedreno+MSM driver stack.
  • Work Revised On Adding SPIR-V Support To Clover Gallium3D
    Last May we reported on a Nouveau developer adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's OpenCL state tracker. Finally the better part of one year later, Pierre Moreau is ready with the second version of these patches to accept this IR associated with Vulkan / OpenCL 2.1+ within Clover.
  • Trying Out DRM-Next For Linux 4.16 With AMDGPU On Polaris & Vega
    I have spent some time this weekend trying out the DRM-Next code slated for inclusion in Linux 4.16 when its merge window opens next week. The DRM-Next state of the AMDGPU driver appears to be in good shape, at least for the RX 580 and RX Vega cards used for my initial testing.
  • RadeonSI NIR Back-End Picks Up Support For More OpenGL Extensions
    It was just a few days ago that Valve Linux developer Timothy Arceri enabled GLSL 4.50 support for RadeonSI's NIR back-end after previously taking care of tessellation shaders and other requirements. Now he has taken to implementing some other extensions in RadeonSI's NIR code-path.
  • mesa 18.0-0-rc1
    The first release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available. The plan is to have one release candidate every Friday, until the anticipated final release on 9th February 2018. The expectation is that the 17.3 branch will remain alive with bi-weekly releases until the 18.0.1 release. NOTE: Building the SWR with LLVM 3.9 is currently not possible. Please use newer LLVM version until the issue is resolved. Here are the people which helped shape the current release.
  • Mesa 18.0 Now Under Feature Freeze With 18.0-RC1 Premiere
    Feature development on Mesa 18.0 has now ended with the release today of 18.0-RC1 following the code-base being branched. Emil Velikov of Collabora just announced the availability of Mesa 18.0-RC1. As usual, he's planning on weekly release candidates until the 18.0.0 stable release is ready to ship. Velikov tentatively expects to ship Mesa 18.0.0 around 9 February, but as we know from past releases, it might end up slipping by some days.

Using Dual 4K Monitors Stacked With GNOME

The setup for my main production system that is still on Fedora Workstation 26 with GNOME Shell 3.24.3 has been working out fine. The two displays are the ASUS MG28UQ monitors that work out well on their own and do work with AMDGPU FreeSync on Linux. A GeForce GTX 1050 Ti is enough to power the dual 3840 x 2160 displays for desktop tasks mostly limited to many terminals, Firefox, Chrome, Thunderbird, and other GNOME desktop applications. Certainly that lower-end Pascal GPU isn't fast enough for 4K gaming, but it's not like I have the time for any gaming and for a purely desktop system it's working out fine paired with the 387.34 proprietary driver on Fedora 26 paired with Linux 4.14. Read more