Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LXer

Syndicate content
Linux and Open Source news headlines
Updated: 25 min 35 sec ago

elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" Officially Released, It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Friday 9th of September 2016 08:23:19 PM
Just a few minutes ago, the guys over elementary announced the release of the elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" GNU/Linux operating system.

AV Linux 2016.8.30 Screencast and Screenshots

Friday 9th of September 2016 07:03:16 PM
AV Linux 2016.8.30 has been released. It is a freely shared 32 and 64bit downloadable and installable ISO Image created from a carefully pre-configured snapshot of the Debian GNU/Linux “Testing” Distribution. This ISO image is provided to facilitate and initiate the use of Linux as an Audio/Video/Graphics content creation platform. AV Linux is essentially a collected showcase of the phenomenal work of Open-Source developers from all over the planet and celebrates and presents their work organized in an easy-to-use fashion.

What you need to know about PostgresOpen 2016

Friday 9th of September 2016 05:43:13 PM
PostgresOpen is the longest running PostgreSQL conference in the United States. This week I had the pleasure of chatting with Stephen Frost, who is the program committee chair and a main organizer of PostgresOpen, which takes place this year in Dallas, TX from September 13-15. We talked about who goes, what sessions to look for, and their charity event which will be helping a cause near and dear to my heart: diversity in tech.read more

How to search files from the terminal on Linux

Friday 9th of September 2016 04:23:10 PM
While there are many ways with which we can search and locate files and directories on Linux, the easiest and quickest is probably through the terminal. However, not many Linux users know about that, which leads to unneeded frustration. Here is a quick guide that will hopefully help you locate what you're looking for in your system.

Why Linux? - Some Reasons For Converting To Linux

Friday 9th of September 2016 03:20:16 PM
Many organisations and businesses world wide are converting their core computer operating system to Linux as opposed to other operating systems for a number of reasons some of which we shall discuss here in after (why linux),this is mostly because of problems faced in daily computer usage both at home and at the work place.

Why the proprietary MQA music encoding system is better than DRM, but still not good

Friday 9th of September 2016 02:17:22 PM
In June 2016, I wrote about the MQA proprietary closed-source music encoding system and shared my thoughts on why I felt the system is not a good thing. Since then, I've been reading more about MQA so this month I'll share additional thoughts.read more

Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" KDE Edition Officially Released, Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Friday 9th of September 2016 01:14:28 PM
Clement Lefebvre has proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the final version of the Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" KDE Edition operating system.

The rise of the shareable document

Friday 9th of September 2016 12:11:34 PM
Higher education is increasingly embracing different concepts of openness, from open access to open education resources (OER). But where does that other open concept—open source—fit into this model? Open source represents the best way to ensure these materials can be easily modified, without risk of material suddenly becoming unchangeable or inaccessible.First, some quick definitions:read more

Board-set aims Bay Trail Pico-ITX SBC at robotics apps

Friday 9th of September 2016 11:05:43 AM
Advantech’s 3.5-inch form-factor “MIO-6300” board-set aims the company’s Celeron N2930-based Pico-ITX SBC at robotics and other real-time control apps. In our recent coverage of Advantech’s Bay Trail-based MIO-3260 Pico-ITX single board computer, we highlighted the ability to use the SBC’s unique MIOe expansion bus to add application-specific I/O and real-world coastline ports by means of […]

How Google Uses and Contributes to Open Source

Friday 9th of September 2016 10:02:49 AM
Engineer Marc Merlin has been working at Google since 2001 but has been involved with Linux since 1993, in its very early days. Since then, open source adoption has dramatically increased, but a new challenge is emerging: Not many companies care about the license side of open source, Merlin stated in his talk “How Google Uses and Contributes to Open Source” at LinuxCon and ContainerCon North America.

I asked "What are the best Linux distributions for the average person", You answered

Friday 9th of September 2016 08:59:55 AM
I asked recently for readers opinions as to the best distributions for the average user. This article highlights the results with contributions from all around the world.

10 Million Raspberry Pi Computers Have Been Sold, New Starter Kit Available

Friday 9th of September 2016 07:57:01 AM
Raspberry Pi Founder Eben Upton was extremely proud to announce that a total of ten million Raspberry Pi single-board computers have been sold to date.

Tasksel – Install Group of Software in A Single Click on Debian/Ubuntu

Friday 9th of September 2016 06:54:07 AM
Tasksel is a handy tool for Debian/Ubuntu systems which will install Group of Software in a single click on your system.

Which compression tool works the best? zip, gzip or bzip2

Friday 9th of September 2016 05:51:13 AM
I have rewritten some of the compression based articles on about.com including those for zip, gzip and bzip2. I decided to test out which worked the best and here are the results.

Keeping DOS alive and kicking with open source

Friday 9th of September 2016 04:48:19 AM
DOS: the Disk Operating System. For many of us whose computer coming-of-age story spanned across the 80s and 90s, we remember it, fondly or not, as the gateway into our computers. But somewhere along the way, DOS gave way to graphical environments, and some of us opted to move to open source alternatives.read more

Christine Hall: FOSS Force’s Grandmama Frump

Friday 9th of September 2016 03:45:25 AM
All we can say is watch this interview with Christine Hall and you’ll know what we have to put up with on a daily basis — equipment that’s not quite up to par and a boss who’s a refugee from The Addams Family.

Setting up the Raspberry Pi just got a lot easier, thanks to PiBakery

Friday 9th of September 2016 02:42:31 AM
A new tool makes it simple to set up the Pi from a laptop, whether for first use or when you're away from home.

Running WordPress on Kubernetes

Friday 9th of September 2016 01:39:37 AM
I recently started to check out Kubernetes and wanted to share with everyone how I got WordPress running on it as a three-tier application.

How to setup a SVN server on CentOS

Friday 9th of September 2016 12:36:43 AM
This tutorial explains how to setup and use an SVN repository server on centOS. Before I start, let me explain what actually SVN represents and what it is used for. SVN is actually an abbreviation of SubVersion which had been created by the Apache software developer. It enables you to create and maintain your own repository and gives fine-grained access rights to a dedicated user.

Build a Pi media centre

Thursday 8th of September 2016 11:33:49 PM
Make your Raspberry Pi the centrepiece of your home entertainment system

More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more

nginx

Case in point: I've been using the Apache HTTP server for many years now. Indeed, you could say that I've been using Apache since before it was even called "Apache"—what started as the original NCSA HTTP server, and then the patched server that some enterprising open-source developers distributed, and finally the Apache Foundation-backed open-source colossus that everyone recognizes, and even relies on, today—doing much more than just producing HTTP servers. Apache's genius was its modularity. You could, with minimal effort, configure Apache to use a custom configuration of modules. If you wanted to have a full-featured server with tons of debugging and diagnostics, you could do that. If you wanted to have high-level languages, such as Perl and Tcl, embedded inside your server for high-speed Web applications, you could do that. If you needed the ability to match, analyze and rewrite every part of an HTTP transaction, you could do that, with mod_rewrite. And of course, there were third-party modules as well. Read more

Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT

Most of the new 21 open source software projects for IoT that we examined last week listed Linux hacker boards as their prime development platforms. This week, we’ll look at open source and developer-friendly Linux hardware for building Internet of Things devices, from simple microcontroller-based technology to Linux-based boards. In recent years, it’s become hard to find an embedded board that isn’t marketing with the IoT label. Yet, the overused term is best suited for boards with low prices, small footprints, low power consumption, and support for wireless communications and industrial interfaces. Camera support is useful for some IoT applications, but high-end multimedia is usually counterproductive to attributes like low cost and power consumption. Read more