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Updated: 1 hour 23 min ago

Ubuntu 17.04 Wallpaper Contest Begins, Submit Your Astonishing Artwork Right Now

Tuesday 31st of January 2017 07:38:38 AM
Ubuntu member Nathan Haines is informing Softpedia about a new installation of the Free Culture Showcase movement, this time for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

Linux Security Threats: Attack Sources and Types of Attacks

Tuesday 31st of January 2017 06:30:01 AM
In part 1 of this series, we discussed the seven different types of hackers who may compromise your Linux system. White hat and black hat hackers, script kiddies, hacktivists, nation states, organized crime, and bots are all angling for a piece of your system for their own nefarious/various reasons.

MongoDB ransom attacks continue to plague administrators

Tuesday 31st of January 2017 05:21:24 AM
Earlier this month, Salted Hash reported on a surge in attacks against publicly accessible MongoDB installations. Since January 3, the day of that first report, the number of victims has climbed from about 200 databases to more than 40,000. In addition to MongoDB, those responsible for the attacks have started targeting Elasticsearch and CouchDB.

IoTivity-Constrained: A Flexible Framework for Tiny Devices

Tuesday 31st of January 2017 04:12:47 AM
The future of IoT will be connected by tiny, resource-constrained edge devices, says Senior Software Engineer at the Intel Open Source Technology Center. And, the IoTivity-Constrained project is a small-footprint implementation of the Open Connectivity Foundation’s (OCF) standards that’s designed to run on just such devices.

Generate SSL Certificates With LetsEncrypt Debian Linux

Tuesday 31st of January 2017 03:04:09 AM
In case you haven't realized already, encryption is important. For the web, that means using SSL certificates to secure web traffic. Recently, Mozilla and Google have gone as far as to mark sites without SSL certificates as insecure in Firefox and Chrome. In order to bring the Web up to speed with encryption, the Linux Foundation along with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and many others created LetsEncrypt.

Mesa 12.0.6 Hits the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 Proposed Repositories

Tuesday 31st of January 2017 01:55:32 AM
After announcing earlier in December 2016 that Mesa 12.0.4 backport is available for testing on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Canonical's Timo Aaltonen is now reporting on the upcoming availability of the Mesa 12.0.6.

Best Linux Distro: Final Round of Voting Has Begun

Tuesday 31st of January 2017 12:46:55 AM
Arch Linux wins the qualifying round for the second year, followed by Linux Mint. In addition, eight distros qualified by write-in votes to be included in our final round. Now it's time to get out the vote in the all-important final round to determine the Best Linux Distro according to our readers.

How to Install Django on an Ubuntu 16.04 VPS

Monday 30th of January 2017 11:38:18 PM
Django is a free and open source, Python-based web application framework. It is a set of useful components that help developers to easily and quickly create their applications.

WOOTConf 2017: Lockpicking, Willie Nelson developers, and more

Monday 30th of January 2017 10:29:41 PM
Do you know that wonderful feeling when a tiny little idea becomes a reality? That's what this year's WOOTConf at linux.conf.au 2017 was for me.It was a full day jam-packed with amazing, deeply technical talks from ten wonderful speakers.read more

4 Easy ways to Remove/Delete PPAs Completely on Ubuntu and its Derivatives

Monday 30th of January 2017 09:21:04 PM
Most of the PPAs are managed by a single developer for personal use or just for hobby. So, i would strongly advise you to install the PPA’s for testing purpose and not for any production activity

4 ways to improve your security online right now

Monday 30th of January 2017 08:12:27 PM
The last few years have seen a massive jump in the frequency of reports about digital security breaches and personal privacy issues, and no doubt this trend will continue. We hear about scammers moving to social media, nations using cyberattacks as part of coordinated offensive strategies, and the rise of companies making millions tracking our online behavior. read more

Lessons Learned Running IBM Watson on Mesos

Monday 30th of January 2017 07:03:50 PM
All these newfangled container and microservices technologies inspire all manner of ingenious experiments, and running IBM[he]#039[/he]s Watson on Apache Mesos has to be one of the most -- maybe it[he]#039[/he]s not fair to say crazy -- but certainly ambitious. Jason Adelman of IBM tells us the story of this novel endeavor at MesosCon Asia 2016.

More performance improvements are on the way for Deus Ex and Tomb Raider on Mesa

Monday 30th of January 2017 05:55:13 PM
Mesa is progressing nicely as usual and I've been keeping an eye on the mailing list for anything interesting. It seems Deus Ex: Mankind Divided and Tomb Raider have both seen some more performance tuning.

Submissions now open for the Fedora 26 supplemental wallpapers

Monday 30th of January 2017 04:46:36 PM
Each release, the Fedora Design team works with the community on a set of 16 additional wallpapers. Users can install and use these to supplement the standard wallpaper. Submissions are now open for the Fedora 26 Supplemental Wallpapers, and will remain open... Continue Reading →

How to get up and running with sweet Orange Pi

Monday 30th of January 2017 03:37:59 PM
As open source-powered hardware like Arduino and Raspberry Pi becomes more and more mainstream, its cost keeps dropping, which opens the door to new and innovative IoT and STEM applications.read more

How To Install Oracle Java 7/8 On Fedora And CentOS

Monday 30th of January 2017 01:58:19 PM
?Java is somewhat one of the most important applications on your system and not having java can bring nightmares. It is suggested to users that after installing the operating system on your computer you should install java on it.

Arch Linux-Based BlackArch Penetration Testing Distribution Gets 20 New Tools

Monday 30th of January 2017 11:09:49 AM
A new set of installation mediums of the open-source, Arch Linux-based BlackArch penetration testing and ethical hacking GNU/Linux distribution arrived on January 28, 2017.

Linux Foundation Executive Directors Statement on Immigration Ban

Monday 30th of January 2017 09:15:27 AM
Linux’s creator, Linux Foundation Fellow Linus Torvalds, immigrated to America from Finland and became a citizen. The Administration's policy on immigration restrictions is antithetical to the values of openness and community that have enabled open source to succeed. I oppose the immigration ban.

The Man Who Didn’t Invent Email Attacks Free Speech

Monday 30th of January 2017 07:21:05 AM
The man whose much disputed claim to have invented email when he was a 14-year-old is taking legal actions, or threatening such, against anyone who publicly disagrees with his version of history.

RaspAnd Now Lets You Run Android 7.1.1 Nougat with Kodi 17 RC4 on Raspberry Pi 3

Monday 30th of January 2017 05:26:43 AM
Arne Exton is informing us about the immediate availability for purchase of a new build of his RaspAnd operating system for Raspberry Pi single-board computers (SBCs), now based on Android 7.1.1 Nougat.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

  • Stop using SHA1 encryption: It’s now completely unsafe, Google proves
    Security researchers have achieved the first real-world collision attack against the SHA-1 hash function, producing two different PDF files with the same SHA-1 signature. This shows that the algorithm's use for security-sensitive functions should be discontinued as soon as possible. SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) dates back to 1995 and has been known to be vulnerable to theoretical attacks since 2005. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has banned the use of SHA-1 by U.S. federal agencies since 2010, and digital certificate authorities have not been allowed to issue SHA-1-signed certificates since Jan. 1, 2016, although some exemptions have been made. However, despite these efforts to phase out the use of SHA-1 in some areas, the algorithm is still fairly widely used to validate credit card transactions, electronic documents, email PGP/GPG signatures, open-source software repositories, backups and software updates.
  • on pgp
    First and foremost I have to pay respect to PGP, it was an important weapon in the first cryptowar. It has helped many whistleblowers and dissidents. It is software with quite interesting history, if all the cryptograms could tell... PGP is also deeply misunderstood, it is a highly successful political tool. It was essential in getting crypto out to the people. In my view PGP is not dead, it's just old and misunderstood and needs to be retired in honor. However the world has changed from the internet happy times of the '90s, from a passive adversary to many active ones - with cheap commercially available malware as turn-key-solutions, intrusive apps, malware, NSLs, gag orders, etc.
  • Cloudflare’s Cloudbleed is the worst privacy leak in recent Internet history
    Cloudflare revealed today that, for months, all of its protected websites were potentially leaking private information across the Internet. Specifically, Cloudflare’s reverse proxies were dumping uninitialized memory; that is to say, bleeding private data. The issue, termed Cloudbleed by some (but not its discoverer Tavis Ormandy of Google Project Zero), is the greatest privacy leak of 2017 and the year has just started. For months, since 2016-09-22 by their own admission, CloudFlare has been leaking private information through Cloudbleed. Basically, random data from random sites (again, it’s worth mentioning that every site that used CloudFlare in the last half year should be considered to having fallen victim to this) would be randomly distributed across the open Internet, and then indefinitely cached along the way.
  • Serious Cloudflare bug exposed a potpourri of secret customer data
    Cloudflare, a service that helps optimize the security and performance of more than 5.5 million websites, warned customers today that a recently fixed software bug exposed a range of sensitive information that could have included passwords and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. A combination of factors made the bug particularly severe. First, the leakage may have been active since September 22, nearly five months before it was discovered, although the greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18. Second, some of the highly sensitive data that was leaked was cached by Google and other search engines. The result was that for the entire time the bug was active, hackers had the ability to access the data in real-time by making Web requests to affected websites and to access some of the leaked data later by crafting queries on search engines. "The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a blog post published Thursday. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."

Security Leftovers

  • Change all the passwords (again)
    Looks like it is time to change all the passwords again. There’s a tiny little flaw in a CDN used … everywhere, it seems.
  • Today's leading causes of DDoS attacks [Ed: The so-called 'Internet of things' (crappy devices with identical passwords) is a mess; programmers to blame, not Linux]
    Of the most recent mega 100Gbps attacks in the last quarter, most of them were directly attributed to the Mirai botnet. The Mirai botnet works by exploiting the weak security on many Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The program finds its victims by constantly scanning the internet for IoT devices, which use factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords.
  • How to Set Up An SSL Certificate on Your Website [via "Steps To Secure Your Website With An SSL Certificate"]
  • SHA-1 is dead, long live SHA-1!
    Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you heard that some researchers managed to create a SHA-1 collision. The short story as to why this matters is the whole purpose of a hashing algorithm is to make it impossible to generate collisions on purpose. Unfortunately though impossible things are usually also impossible so in reality we just make sure it’s really really hard to generate a collision. Thanks to Moore’s Law, hard things don’t stay hard forever. This is why MD5 had to go live on a farm out in the country, and we’re not allowed to see it anymore … because it’s having too much fun. SHA-1 will get to join it soon.
  • SHA1 collision via ASCII art
    Happy SHA1 collision day everybody! If you extract the differences between the good.pdf and bad.pdf attached to the paper, you'll find it all comes down to a small ~128 byte chunk of random-looking binary data that varies between the files.
  • PayThink Knowledge is power in fighting new Android attack bot
    Android users and apps have become a major part of payments and financial services, carrying an increased risk for web crime. It is estimated that there are 107.7 million Android Smartphone users in the U.S. who have downloaded more than 65 million apps from the Google App Store, and each one of them represents a smorgasbord of opportunity for hackers to steal user credentials and other information.
  • Red Hat: 'use after free' vulnerability found in Linux kernel's DCCP protocol IPV6 implementation
    Red Hat Product Security has published details of an "important" security vulnerability in the Linux kernel. The IPv6 implementation of the DCCP protocol means that it is possible for a local, unprivileged user to alter kernel memory and escalate their privileges. Known as the "use-after-free" flaw, CVE-2017-6074 affects a number of Red Hat products including Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and Red Hat Openshift Online v2. Mitigating factors include the requirement for a potential attacker to have access to a local account on a machine, and for IPV6 to be enabled, but it is still something that will be of concern to Linux users. Describing the vulnerability, Red Hat says: "This flaw allows an attacker with an account on the local system to potentially elevate privileges. This class of flaw is commonly referred to as UAF (Use After Free.) Flaws of this nature are generally exploited by exercising a code path that accesses memory via a pointer that no longer references an in use allocation due to an earlier free() operation. In this specific issue, the flaw exists in the DCCP networking code and can be reached by a malicious actor with sufficient access to initiate a DCCP network connection on any local interface. Successful exploitation may result in crashing of the host kernel, potential execution of code in the context of the host kernel or other escalation of privilege by modifying kernel memory structures."

Android Leftovers