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Linux and Open Source news headlines
Updated: 1 hour 23 min ago

Factorio is leaving Early Access in September next year with Linux support

1 hour 50 min ago
With a Linux version that already works very well, the engrossing building game Factorio is going to fully released next year.

Configuring Ansible

2 hours 51 min ago
In a previous article, I covered Red Hat Ansible basics and installed Ansible, creating one control node named RHEL8 and four managed nodes (node1, node2, node3, and node4), all running Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Now, for Ansible to communicate with a managed node, you need to configure the control node and the managed nodes with a user account, and give that user account privilege escalation to run commands without having to enter a password.

Generate random passwords with this Bash script

3 hours 53 min ago
Periodically, I need to come up with new passwords, some of which need to be more secure than others. My mind often seems to draw a blank when I have to create a new login, and this short Bash script fills that void. Full disclosure: I found most of this script posted somewhere and made a minor modification to it.read more

Linux device mapper writecache

4 hours 54 min ago
Solid State Drives (SSDs) brought performance to the forefront of computing technologies, and their adoption is increasing not only in the data center but also in consumer-grade products. Unlike its traditional spinning hard disk drive (HDD) counterpart, SSDs comprise a collection of computer chips (non-volatile NAND memory) with no movable parts. Therefore SSDs are not kept busy seeking to new drive locations and, in turn, introducing latency. As great as this sounds, SSDs are still more expensive than HDDs. HDD prices have settled to around $0.03/GB; SSD prices vary but sit at around $0.13-$0.15/GB. At scale, that price gap makes a world of difference.

How to comment out lines in configuration files on Linux

5 hours 56 min ago
This tutorial focuses on commenting lines in a configuration file on Linux, the examples used here are from Debian 10. However they will work on any other linux distribution too.

Orange Pi 4 has an RK3399 and an optional NPU

6 hours 58 min ago
Shenzhen Xunlong has posted preliminary specs for a Rockchip RK3399 based “Orange Pi 4” SBC that is smaller and more affordable than the Orange Pi RK3399 and faster and more feature rich than the Orange Pi 3. A 4B variant adds a Lightspeeur 2801S AI chip.

How to use pkgsrc on Linux

7 hours 50 min ago
NetBSD is famous for running on basically anything, but did you know its second claim to fame is the pkgsrc package manager? Like NetBSD, pkgsrc runs on basically anything, or at least anything Unix and Unix-like. You can install pkgsrc on BSD, Linux, Illumos, Solaris, and Mac. All told, over 20 operating systems are supported.read more

Packet sniffer basics for network troubleshooting

9 hours 4 min ago
Capturing packets with a free tool like tcpdump is an essential skill that you need to acquire as a sysadmin. Anthony Critelli shows you the ropes.

HP Linux Imaging & Printing Drivers Now Supported on Ubuntu 19.10 and Fedora 31

10 hours 18 min ago
The HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has released a new version of their driver stack for Linux-based operation systems to support their HP printers and scanners on more devices and systems.

How to run SQL Statements Using Python Pandas

11 hours 33 min ago
This post gets you started in Python Pandas. This article is a good primer for users who come from SQL background and want to leverage python Pandas for data analytics.

How to use regular expressions in awk

12 hours 34 min ago
In awk, regular expressions (regex) allow for dynamic and complex pattern definitions. You're not limited to searching for simple strings but also patterns within patterns.The syntax for using regular expressions to match lines in awk is:word ~ /match/The inverse of that is not matching a pattern:read more

Google have now expanded the launch titles for Stadia up to 22

13 hours 36 min ago
Stadia, the Debian Linux and Vulkan powered game streaming service which you can play on a Linux desktop now has a more impressive launch lineup.

Cheat sheet for Linux users and permissions

14 hours 37 min ago
The Linux operating system is a true multi-user OS, meaning it assumes that there's data on every computer that should be protected, whether in the interest of privacy, security, or system integrity. Linux uses file ownership and permissions to manage file and folder access. For administrators who deal with different user environments all day, this system is easy to understand, calculate, and control.

Fix Force Quit (X Is Not Responding) Dialog Freezing GNOME Shell 3.34

15 hours 39 min ago
Are you getting a "Application / game is not responding. You may choose to wait for a short while for it to continue or force the application to quit entirely" message when trying to run a game or an application that takes a long time to start on GNOME 3.34 with Xorg, this causing GNOME Shell to become unresponsive / freeze with some screen flickering on top? This article presents a very simple workaround for this issue.

Redis Labs eases database management with RedisInsight

16 hours 40 min ago
Based on the open source RDBTools project, Redis Labs' new tool gives database administrators a stable graphical user interface for database management.

How To Easily Recall Forgotten Linux Commands

17 hours 42 min ago
Apropos command and BASH history helps us to easily recall forgotten Linux commands.

Moving the Home folder to another partition in Ubuntu

18 hours 43 min ago
Usually when you have Ubuntu installed, it is likely that the system folders and the home folder all belong to the same partition.In order to keep your custom settings, your files and folders, it is recommended that you put your home folder in a specific partition so that future alterations on the system files and folders will not have any effect on the home folder so that you would be able to upgrade or even reinstall your Ubuntu without damaging the current custom files configuration.

LibreOffice 6.4 Enters Beta with Native GTK Dialogs, QR Code Generator, and More

19 hours 45 min ago
The upcoming LibreOffice 6.4 open-source and cross-platform office suite release has recently entered beta testing phase two months ahead of its official release early next year.

The worlds fastest supercomputers hit higher speeds than ever with Linux

Tuesday 19th of November 2019 07:35:08 AM
The new list of the world[he]#039[/he]s fastest computers -- supercomputing[he]#039[/he]s Top 500 -- is out, and every one runs faster than a petaflop using Linux.

Mini Type 10 dev board supports extended mini-PCIe I/O modules

Tuesday 19th of November 2019 06:33:36 AM
Acromag’s rugged “ACEX4041” Mini-ITX carrier is equipped with a Linux-friendly, Apollo Lake based COM Express Mini Type 10 module plus 4x mini-PCIe based “AcroPack” slots that support 25+ I/O modules. Acromag announced a Mini-ITX form-factor carrier board for COM Express Mini Type 10 modules sold in three configurations: barebones (ACEX4041); equipped with an Intel Apollo […]

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Headlines, LibreOffice 6.4 Alpha Quick Look and OpenIndiana 2019.10 Overview

Announcing coreboot 4.11

The coreboot project is proud to announce to have released coreboot 4.11. This release cycle was a bit shorter to get closer to our regular schedule of releasing in spring and autumn. Since 4.10 there were 1630 new commits by over 130 developers. Of these, about 30 contributed to coreboot for the first time. Thank you to all contributors who made 4.11 what it is and welcome to the project to all new contributors! Read more Also: Coreboot 4.11 Brings Many Intel Improvements, New Support For Supermicro / Lenovo Boards

GNOME Development: Technical Reports From Federico Mena-Quintero and Jussi Pakkanen

  • Refactoring the Length type

    Over a couple of years, librsvg's type that represents CSS lengths went from a C representation along the lines of "all data in the world is an int", to a Rust representation that uses some interesting type trickery: C struct with char for units. C struct with a LengthUnits enum. C struct without an embodied direction; each place that needs to normalize needs to get the orientation right. C struct with a built-in direction as an extra field, done at initialization time. Same struct but in Rust. An ugly but workable Parse trait so that the direction can be set at parse/initialization time. Three newtypes LengthHorizontal, LengthVertical, LengthBoth with a common core. A cleaned-up Parse trait. A macro to generate those newtypes. Replace the LengthDir enum with an Orientation trait, and three zero-sized types Horizontal/Vertical/Both that implement the trait. Replace most of the macro with a helper trait LengthTrait that has an Orientation associated type. Replace the helper trait with a single Length<T: Orientation> type, which puts the orientation as a generic parameter. The macro disappears and there is a single implementation for everything. Refactoring never ends!

  • Some intricacies of ABI stability

    As far as I know, there is no known real-world solution to this problem that would scale to a full operating system (i.e. all of Debian, FreeBSD or the like). If there are any university professors reading this needing problems for your grad students, this could be one of them. The problem itself is fairly simple to formulate: make it possible to run two different, ABI incompatible C++ standard libraries within one process. The solution will probably require changes in the compiler, linker and runtime loader. For example, you might extend symbol resolution rules so that they are not global, but instead symbols from, say library bar would first be looked up in its direct descendents (in this case only abi2) and only after that in other parts of the tree. To get you started, here is one potential solution I came up with while writing this post. I have no idea if it actually works, but I could not come up with an obvious thing that would break. I sadly don't have the time or know-how to implement this, but hopefully someone else has.

Graphics and Games: Intel, Vulkan, Trine and Google Stadia

  • Intel's Graphics Driver DoS Fix Last Week Has Hurt Power Consumption

    While the patches overnight about "substantial" improvement in power usage for Intel graphics on Linux were exciting on first look, it's less so now as it turns out last week's graphics driver security fixes is what regressed the Intel graphics power-savings. During last Tuesday's round of Intel security disclosures where there was a fix for denial of service in the Intel graphics driver, it turns out that the CVE-2019-0154 fix is what regressed power usage. The potential Denial of Service vulnerability was about unprivileged users being able to cause a DoS by reading select memory regions when the graphics hardware is in certain low-power states.

  • vkBasalt 0.2 Released With SMAA, Other Vulkan Post Processing Layer Enhancements

    The open-source vkBasalt project was started as a layer implementing Contrast Adaptive Sharpening (akin to Radeon Image Sharpening) for any Vulkan-using GPU/driver/software. The vkBasalt project then picked up FXAA support for this Vulkan post-processing layer while now a new release is out with more functionality added. The vkBasalt 0.2 release is out today and adds support for enhanced sub-pixel morphological anti-aliasing (SMAA) for higher-quality anti-aliasing than FXAA. SMAA is an image-based implementation of MLAA. This release also allows for multiple visual effects to be activated at once where as previously only any one of these image enhancing features could be active at a time.

  • Flax Engine Ported To Linux + Vulkan Rendering Support

    Flax Engine is the latest game engine seeing native Linux support and in the process the renderer also picked up Vulkan support. Flax Engine is a lesser known game engine that now works on Linux alongside Windows and Xbox One. After two years in development, the open beta release of Flax is expected soon.

  • The sad case of Trine on Mesa and Linux in 2019

    A year or so back I was planning on writing a congratulatory article to show my appreciation to Dave Airlie for fixing a long standing bug in Mesa that prevented users of older AMD Radeon HD cards from enjoying Trine Enchanted Edition on the free graphics stack. Bug 91808 resulted in a variety of graphical artifacts which, while not interfering with the gameplay, still put me off using that version of Trine. After several years and a great deal of evident frustration on his part, Airlie was able to track down the root of the problem and at long last was able to push a fix to master in May 2018. Airlie and developers like him are often the unsung heroes of FOSS development, and I wanted to give him a well deserved public pat on the back for his effort in fixing a bug which would only have affected such a small number of people. Unfortunately my research into this led me down an entirely different rabbit hole when I discovered the report for Bug 66067. A much more subtle misrendering of the game's colours and lighting, this bug is present in both Trine 2 and Trine Enchanted Edition and affects all Mesa users. Unlike the previous instance where it was an issue in the drivers that was the culprit, this issue is present in the game binaries themselves.

  • Google Stadia is out now for early adopters, well a few anyway

    Today, the Google Stadia streaming service officially launched for those who picked up the Founder or Premier Edition. Well, sort of anyway. Some people have it, a lot of people don't, we certainly don't and it appears the team at Stadia give different answers to different people on when you will actually be able to access it. I've also seen plenty of people whose orders have been cancelled without warning or explanation. Even worse still, some people have been sent their hardware without an access code. Google have, so far, done a terrible job at communicating on Stadia and so the initial launch doesn't seem to have gone down well at all.