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Updated: 1 hour 6 min ago

QtCon Keynote: Software as a Public Service

Wednesday 24th of August 2016 08:41:06 AM

QtCon is happy to welcome Julia Reda, the closing keynote speaker. Member of the European Parliament for the Pirate Party and Vice-Chair of the Greens/European Free Alliance. Reda's legislative focus is on copyright and internet policy issues.

As a member of the European Parliament and together with Max Andersson, Julia Reda initiated the pilot project “Governance and quality of software code – Auditing of free and open source software” in 2014 as a reaction to the so-called “heartbleed” bug in OpenSSL. The idea turned into the pilot-project "Free and Open Source Software Auditing“ (FOSSA) that is aiming at improving the security of those Free Software programs that are in use by the European Commission and the Parliament.

Although the implementation of this project did receive some feedback for improvement, Reda will explain why this project is important and how it takes use one step further towards understanding FLOSS as a public service: "If free/libre open source software belongs to the public, the public needs to take responsibility for it."

Julia Reda's talk will leave participants at QtCon with an inspiring and forward-looking talk about Free Software, security and public responsibilty.

Happening on: Sunday, 2016-09-04, 15:45 - 16:45 CEST, BCC Germany

Canonical Becomes a Patron of KDE e.V.

Thursday 18th of August 2016 04:09:04 PM

KDE and Canonical's Ubuntu have collaborated for years. Today we celebrate the extension of this collaboration with the addition of Canonical to the KDE Patrons family, as part of the corporate membership program.

As explained by Michael Hall, Ubuntu Community Manager,

"From its very beginning Canonical has been a major investor in the Free Software desktop. We work with PC manufacturers such as Dell, HP and Lenovo to ship the best Free Software to millions of desktop users worldwide. Becoming a corporate patron is the continuation of Canonical's decade-long support for KDE and Kubuntu as important members of the Ubuntu family.
Canonical will be working with the KDE community to keep making the latest KDE technology available to Ubuntu and Kubuntu users, and expanding that into making Snap packages of KDE frameworks and applications that are easily installable by users of any Linux desktop. We will benefit from sharing knowledge, experience and code around Qt and Qt packaging, pushing the advancement of QML and increasing its adoption in Unity and Ubuntu native applications alongside KDE's own work towards convergence."

Aleix Pol Gonzalez, Vice-President of KDE e.V. stated,

"We are excited to have Canonical supporting KDE's work. It is important that we make a continuous effort to work together and this is the best way to continue offering a thriving free and open development platform to build upon. We are confident that this collaboration can be very beneficial for the overall GNU/Linux community and ecosystem."

Canonical will join KDE e.V.'s other Patrons The Qt Company, SuSE, Google and Blue Systems to continue to support Free Software and KDE development through the KDE e.V.

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Three Weeks Until QtCon!

Friday 12th of August 2016 11:19:44 AM

From 1 to 4 September 2016 the communities of KDE, Qt, FSFE, VideoLAN and KDAB join forces in Berlin for QtCon. The program consists of a mix of Qt trainings on day 1, unconference sessions, lightning talks and more than 150 in-depths talks on technical and community topics on days 2 to 4. Track topics range from KDE‘s Latest and Greatest, Testing and Continuous Integration and QtQuick to Free Software policies and politics, Community and Beyond code. Check out the program.

The main conference days will take place at the bcc. The KDE community part of the conference with BoFs and hacking will happen at the Technical University of Berlin from 5 to 8 September.

If you haven't registered yet, do it now!

Attendance for QtCon (but not for the Training day) is generally free for community members if you register in advance. However, we're asking for a donation during the registration process that will help to cover parts of the organization costs (venue, catering which includes lunch and so on) not covered by our sponsors. There's a recommended amount, but any contribution will be welcome. Thank you for your support.

Also, please be aware that you will have to pay a full fee of 200 Euro if you register on the day, so make sure to register through the website now.

Looking forward to seeing you in Berlin!

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KDE's Kirigami UI Framework Gets its First Public Release

Wednesday 10th of August 2016 10:03:40 AM

Kirigami, KDE’s lightweight user interface framework for mobile and convergent applications, which was first announced in March, is now publicly released! This framework allows Qt developers to easily create applications that run on most major mobile and desktop platforms without modification (though adapted user interfaces for different form-factors are supported and recommended for optimal user experience). It extends the touch-friendly Qt Quick Controls with larger application building blocks, following the design philosophy laid out in the Kirigami Human Interface Guidelines.

KDE has a long tradition of providing user interface components beyond the basics that are offered in Qt itself. With KDE Frameworks 5, these have become more easily available for Qt developers who are not part of KDE. Now, with KDE’s focus expanding beyond desktop and laptop computers into the mobile and embedded sector, our QWidgets-based components alone are not sufficient anymore. In order to allow developers to easily create Qt-based applications that run on any major mobile or desktop operating system (including our very own existing Plasma Desktop and upcoming Plasma Mobile, of course), we have created a framework that extends Qt Quick Controls: Welcome Kirigami!

Kirigami is not just a set of components, it is also a philosophy that defines precise UI/UX patterns. It allows developers to quickly develop intuitive and consistent apps that provide a great user experience. Some concepts are:

  • Actions are available in two drawers and additionally through some shortcuts (buttons or swipes)
  • Actions and options are distinguished into global ones and contextual ones, put in two different drawers in the opposite vertical sides of the screen
  • The app’s content is organized in pages that you can browse through with horizontal swipes.

The Kirigami Components for smartphones are optimized to allow easy navigation and interaction with just one hand, making it ideal for using applications casually “on the move”. Kirigami is not only for smartphone applications. It will allow to create convergent applications, which are not simply the exact same user interface scaled to different sizes, but morphing between optimized interfaces based on the input method and screen size, changing as the context changes (e.g. flipping over a convertible, docking a phone). Another important concept is non-invasive pop-ups to undo an action, rather than confirmation dialogs.

Why the name Kirigami? Kirigami is a Japanese art of papercraft. It is derived from origami, but adds cutting as an additional technique to folding. The reason we chose it as the name for our framework is that different layers or “sheets” in the UI are an important element in its design philosophy. Navigating through screens and the pop up of the drawers are like flicking through sheets of paper.

The first real-world application implemented using Kirigami components, Subsurface-mobile, is available for Android, a version for iOS is currently in the works – sharing most of their code. The Subsurface mobile team (which is lead by VMware’s Chief Open Source Officer Dirk Hohndel and has a certain Linus Torvalds as one of their core contributors) and their group of enthusiastic beta testers have worked closely with the developers and designers behind Kirigami to improve both the framework and the application based on their real-world experiences.

The second Kirigami-based application to be released, the comic book reader Peruse, had its initial release in June, and was made available on both desktop Linux and Windows as well as KDE’s own Plasma Mobile. The application targets both touch based devices and the touchless desktops and laptops that are still very common, and as with Subsurface above, Kirigami has allowed for the majority of the code to be shared between those two versions. When asked about the experience, the main developer of Peruse, Dan Leinir Turthra Jensen, stated that “developing with Kirigami has been really exciting, and the team behind it is very responsive to suggestions and reports of any issues in the components.”

Kirigami currently officially supports Android, Desktop GNU/Linux (both X11 and Wayland), Windows, and the upcoming Plasma Mobile. iOS support is currently in an experimental stage, support for Ubuntu Touch is being worked on.
The plan is to eventually become part of KDE Frameworks 5, but is currently released standalone in KDE Extragear. Since it is aimed to be a Tier 1 framework, it has no other dependencies apart from Qt, and therefore will not increase your application’s size any more than necessary.
Kirigami is relatively easy to port to new platforms. If you'd like to see support for a platform not mentioned here, please get in touch with the Kirigami team and they will be glad to help you get Kirigami to work there.

You can find links to the code, API documentation and contact details on the Kirigami Techbase page.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 Released, Available to Download Now

The Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 releases are now available to download. You know the drill by now: {num} Ubuntu flavors, some freshly pressed ISOs, plenty of new bugs to find and no guarantees that things won’t go boom. Read more Also: Ubuntu 16.10 Beta Launches for Opt-in Flavors, Adds GCC 6.2 and LibreOffice 5.2

Games for GNU/Linux

PC-BSD Becomes TrueOS, FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches RC2

  • More Details On PC-BSD's Rebranding As TrueOS
    Most Phoronix readers know PC-BSD as the BSD operating system derived from FreeBSD that aims to be user-friendly on the desktop side and they've done a fairly good job at that over the years. However, the OS has been in the process of re-branding itself as TrueOS. PC-BSD has been offering "TrueOS Server" for a while now as their FreeBSD-based server offering. But around the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 release they are looking to re-brand their primary desktop download too now as TrueOS.
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 Arrives With Fixes
    The second release candidate to the upcoming FreeBSD 11 is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 ships with various bug fixes, several networking related changes, Clang compiler fixes, and other updates. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the what's new guide.

Hosting, Servers, VMs and Containers

  • Open Source, Containers and the Cloud: News from ContainerCon and LinuxCon
    LinuxCon and ContainerCon, events focused on Linux, containers and open source software, wrapped up this week in Toronto. Here's a round-up of the announcements and insights related to cloud computing that emerged from the meeting. LinuxCon and ContainerCon are co-located events. That made for an interesting combination this year because Linux is an established technology, which is celebrating its twenty-fifth anniversary. In contrast, containers remain a new and emerging enterprise technology. (Yes, containers themselves are much older, but it has only been in the past three years, with the launch of Docker, that containers are becoming a big deal commercially.) The two events thus paired discussion of a very entrenched platform, Linux, with one that is still very much in development. But open source, the coding and licensing model behind both Linux and container platforms like Docker, tied everything together.
  • Citrix Enables NetScaler for Containers and Micro-Services
    At the LinuxCon ContainerCon event here, a core topic of discussion is about how to enable enterprises to be able to embrace containers. Citrix has a few ideas on how to help and is announcing enhancements to its NetScaler networking gear to enable load balancing for containers and micro-services.
  • Want to Work for a Cloud Company? Here’s the Cream of the Crop
    What do Asana, Greenhouse Software, WalkMe, Chef Software, and Sprout Social have in common? They’ve been deemed the very best privately held “cloud” companies to work for, according to new rankings compiled by Glassdoor and venture capital firm Battery Ventures. For “The 50 Highest Rated Private Cloud Computing Companies,” Glassdoor and Battery worked with Mattermark to come up with a list of non-public companies that offer cloud-based services, and then culled them, making sure that each entry had at least 30 Glassdoor reviews, Neeraj Agrawal, Battery Ventures general partner told Fortune.
  • Red Hat Updates its Kernel-based Virtual Machine
    Red Hat updated its Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM)-powered virtualization platform for both Linux- and Windows-based workloads.
  • Red Hat Virtualization 4 Takes on Proprietary Competition
    Red Hat continues to move well beyond its core enteprise Linux-based roots with a string of new releases. The company has announced the general availability of Red Hat Virtualization 4, the latest release of its Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) -powered virtualization platform. It fully supports OpenStack’s Neutron – the networking project leveraged in SDNs. The company emphasizes that Red Hat Virtualization 4 challenges the economics and complexities of proprietary virtualization solutions by providing a fully-open, high-performing, more secure, and centrally managed platform for both Linux- and Windows-based workloads. It combines an updated hypervisor, advanced system dashboard, and centralized networking for users’ evolving workloads.