Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSNews

Syndicate content OSNews.com
Exploring the Future of Computing
Updated: 13 min 57 sec ago

Apple hires BlackBerry talent for its car project

Thursday 28th of July 2016 10:26:41 PM
Dan Dodge, the founder and former chief executive officer of QNX, the operating system developer that BlackBerry acquired in 2010, joined Apple earlier this year, the people said. He is part of a team headed by Bob Mansfield, who, since taking over leadership of the cars initiative - dubbed Project Titan - has heralded a shift in strategy, according to a person familiar with the plan. The initiative is now prioritizing the development of an autonomous driving system, though it's not abandoning efforts to design its own vehicle. That leaves options open should the company eventually decide to partner with or acquire an established car maker, rather than build a car itself. An Apple spokesman declined to comment. This whole thing of Apple designing, building, and selling a car still seems so extreme to me - it feels like jumping the shark, really - but at the same time, it could just as well be the genius move that prolongs Apple's winning streak for decades to come. I have far too little insight into the car industry to say anything meaningful here, but it does fascinate me that a technology company like Apple is presumably entering the car market.

"Apple's negotiating tactics sunk its long-rumored TV service"

Thursday 28th of July 2016 10:22:00 PM
In the months leading up to the announcement of the new Apple TV box last year, there were multiple reports that said the company was also working on a streaming TV service as a way to entice cord-cutters and "cord-nevers" into its ecosystem. Those reports suggested that the service would include some 25 channels and cost $30 or $40 a month, and it would stream live content as well as offer a Netflix-esque back catalog of shows on demand. But it never came to pass. When the new Apple TV launched, Apple pushed apps as the future of TV rather than an all-in-one service. A new report from the Wall Street Journal today says that Apple's negotiating tactics were to blame and that the service didn't come to pass in part because Apple was offering too little money and making too many demands. The source article is behind a paywall, so hence the link to the Ars story instead. You can try and use this link through Google to get the source article.

Dark Patterns are designed to trick you

Thursday 28th of July 2016 05:52:24 PM
Ars Technica talks about dark patterns: Everyone has been there. So in 2010, London-based UX designer Harry Brignull decided he'd document it. Brignull’s website, darkpatterns.org, offers plenty of examples of deliberately confusing or deceptive user interfaces. These dark patterns trick unsuspecting users into a gamut of actions: setting up recurring payments, purchasing items surreptitiously added to a shopping cart, or spamming all contacts through prechecked forms on Facebook games. I can't recall ever falling for a dark pattern, but I see these things everywhere - a sure sign that whatever company, website, or whatever, you're dealing with is not worthy of your time.

Apple celebrates one billion iPhones

Wednesday 27th of July 2016 10:43:14 PM
"iPhone has become one of the most important, world-changing and successful products in history. It's become more than a constant companion. iPhone is truly an essential part of our daily life and enables much of what we do throughout the day," said Cook. "Last week we passed another major milestone when we sold the billionth iPhone. We never set out to make the most, but we've always set out to make the best products that make a difference. Thank you to everyone at Apple for helping change the world every day." There's a lot you can say about Apple and the iPhone - but you can't say the device didn't cause a revolution in computing. This is a major milestone, and I'd like to congratulate all the men and women involved in the iPhone's inception and further development. Apple is more than just the corporate facade and Tim Cook and Steve Jobs. There's thousands of men and women working there, and this is a major achievement for them.

The Apple goes mushy: OS X's interface decline

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 10:08:33 PM
Nicholas W. Howard: Wander into almost any online forum or article comment section about a controversial announcement from Apple Inc. and you will almost certainly hear a variation of this sentence: "Apple has gone downhill since Steve Jobs died." The sentence slithers around vaguely; it never seems to specify how, or in what ways, Apple has gone downhill. I agree, nonetheless, that it has. Whether or not Steve Jobs's absence caused the decline (though I suspect it did), I grow frustrated as I watch each software update further erode one pillar of Apple's formerly astronomical greatness. No: I am not referring to their software's stability, important and perhaps worsening with time as it may be. I walk a different tightrope. The design-community-approved articles pertaining to an "Apple software decline" focus on bugs (see Marco Arment, Glenn Fleishman, Russell Ivanovic) or even lunge for their shields to claim that Apple has no such software problems (see Jim Lynch), with the glaring exception of this thoughtful and much-needed lament by Don Norman and Bruce Tognazzini. The article you are about to read will address the same unsung subject as Norman and Tognazzini's article: the design, not the engineering, of Apple's graphical user interfaces. But where their article is general, I have harvested specific example after specific example of the user interface decline of (the now-former) OS X. A great article with which I wholeheartedly agree - but my agreement comes with a twist. Where Howard seems to regard the purest form of the Aqua graphical user interface as the bar for the decline, I consider the bar to be what is now referred to as the Classic graphical user interface, but which is actually named Platinum, which reached its zenith in Mac OS 9. Platinum in Mac OS 9 was elegant, clear, memorable, focused, and pleasant. Forget OS 9's multitude of structural problems - it was a terribly designed house of cards that would crumble if you looked at it funny - and just focus on the UI, in which elements are clearly marked, there's tons of useful but not annoying visual feedback, and a rare sense of spatiality to it all. Aqua has always been too candy cane for me, and it's only gone downhill from there for Apple - iOS and Mac OS today are dreadfully bland and void of character, and this article does a decent job illustrating it.

Apple reports Q3 2016 earnings

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 10:00:00 PM
Apple sold 40.4 million iPhones during the quarter, down from 47.5 million a year earlier, while Mac sales were 4.25 million units, down from from 4.8 million units in the year-ago quarter. iPad sales were also down once again, falling to 9.95 million from 10.9 million. If the rumours are right and the next iPhone is indeed another minor spec bump, Apple is in for a rough year. With "rough" meaning "making incredible amounts of money, just a little less than they'd hoped, but still more than can be comprehended on a day-to-day basis". I wish I had Apple's rough quarters.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta Adds NVDIMM Support, Improves Security

Today, August 25, 2016, Red Hat announced that version 7.3 of its powerful Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system is now in development, and a Beta build is available for download and testing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta brings lots of improvements and innovations, support for new hardware devices, and improves the overall security of the Linux kernel-based operating system used by some of the biggest enterprises and organizations around the globe. Among some of the major new features implemented in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 release, we can mention important networking improvements, and support for Non-Volatile Dual In-line Memory Modules (NVDIMMs). Read more Also: CentOS 6 Linux OS Receives Important Kernel Security Update from Red Hat Release of Red Hat Virtualization 4 Offers New Functionality for Workloads

Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 Released, Available to Download Now

The Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 releases are now available to download. You know the drill by now: {num} Ubuntu flavors, some freshly pressed ISOs, plenty of new bugs to find and no guarantees that things won’t go boom. Read more Also: Ubuntu 16.10 Beta Launches for Opt-in Flavors, Adds GCC 6.2 and LibreOffice 5.2

Games for GNU/Linux

PC-BSD Becomes TrueOS, FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches RC2

  • More Details On PC-BSD's Rebranding As TrueOS
    Most Phoronix readers know PC-BSD as the BSD operating system derived from FreeBSD that aims to be user-friendly on the desktop side and they've done a fairly good job at that over the years. However, the OS has been in the process of re-branding itself as TrueOS. PC-BSD has been offering "TrueOS Server" for a while now as their FreeBSD-based server offering. But around the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 release they are looking to re-brand their primary desktop download too now as TrueOS.
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 Arrives With Fixes
    The second release candidate to the upcoming FreeBSD 11 is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 ships with various bug fixes, several networking related changes, Clang compiler fixes, and other updates. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the what's new guide.