Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSNews

Syndicate content OSNews.com
Exploring the Future of Computing
Updated: 1 hour 24 min ago

Folders, new resolutions coming to WP 8.1 Update 1

Sunday 27th of July 2014 07:49:17 PM
Microsoft has accidentally spilled the beans on Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1, and it's going to be a relatively small update for users, but a big one for OEMs and thus the platform. The number of user-facing features is small (Windows Phone is finally getting folder support!), but it increases support for different resolutions and screen sizes - up to 7". More features might be coming that aren't yet leaked, but the focus of the update is clear: hardware support.

Trend Micro caught lying about Android security

Sunday 27th of July 2014 11:51:41 AM
Antivirus peddler Trend Micro recently issued a "report", in which it states that "Google Play [is] populated with fake apps, with more than half carrying malware". Sounds scary, right? Well, reality is a little different, as TechRepulic and Android Police found out. It turns out that Trend Micro is guilty of a little over-eager language that obfuscated the nature of some of these threats. While there are indeed fake versions of many popular Android apps available for download, Trend failed to mention in their initial promotion for the report that the apps in question were posted outside the Play Store, and had to be installed manually in what's commonly known as a side-load. This requires users to download the app in a browser, ignore a standard security warning about APK files, and disable a security option in Android's main settings menu. As I've been saying for years and years now, antivirus peddlers are the scum of the technology industry. These people actively lie and spread FUD about popular platforms just to scare people into buying their crappy, bloated, unnecessary software. They tried these scummy scare tactics for OS X, iOS, and recently it's been Android's turn. Of course, it doesn't help that people like Tim Cook actively join in on the lying and FUD. You can spot the FUD from miles away. It usually contains something like "99% of all mobile malware targets Android", which may technically be true, but is actually entirely meaningless without the figure that actually matters: infection rates to determine just how successful this malware actually is. The actual infection rate figures make it very clear that they are, in fact, not successful at all. Another dead giveaway that you're dealing with antivirus FUD is "[platform] is insecure. Buy our software to make it secure". Android is just as secure as iOS. The figures are out there for all to see. Any time you see articles about reports regarding Android's security, you can be 100% sure it's coming from antivirus peddlers, meaning the figures will be contorted, false, manipulated, or just downright made up. These people are not to be trusted. If you still haven't learned that lesson, you are either stupid, or you have an agenda to push.

Symbian and its drive letters

Friday 25th of July 2014 10:28:08 PM
From an article I stumbled upon today, detailing the file manager that shipped on virtually every Symbian device in history. The Files UI should be familiar to anyone that has used a file manager or folder system/explorer on a computer and it behaves the same as well. Pictured to the left is the standard view when you open Files. It shows several "drives", C:, E: and F: with F: being your memory card if your Symbian device has a memory card (SD, Mini/Micro SD) slot. Pictured to the right, you can see additional drives that are shown when you connect external devices via USB On-The-Go (if your device has USB-OTG) such as flash drives, hard drives or other phones. G: and H: represent the Mass Memory and Memory card on my Nokia N8 that is connected to my 808 PureView via USB OTG... that's a LOT of GBs to manage! Back when I used Symbian as my main smartphone operating system (I had an E72), I always found it funny that Symbian used drive letters, while the mobile operating system I used for years and years (Windows Mobile/PocketPC) did not - or at least, not in a user-visible manner. At the time, I assumed that Symbian used drive letters in a virtual way to placate Windows users who were used to them. In recent years, however, I've found out that Symbian's use of drive letters actually goes back much farther than that. Psion's EPOC (Symbian's 16bit predecessor; Symbian was created by Psion) also used drive letters - open up a Series 3 (I have a 3a) and you'll see that the two disk slots are designated A and B. Going even further back in time, even my Psion Organiser II (1986) used A: and B: for its two disk slots. I don't have a device to check, but I would assume that the Organiser I also used drive letters. Interesting how a concept dating back to CP/CMS made it all the way to the most modern Symbian phones.

Among mobile app developers, the middle class has disappeared

Friday 25th of July 2014 10:00:18 PM
survey from market research firm VisionMobile, there are 2.9 million app developers in the world who have built about two million apps. Most of those app developers are making next to nothing in revenue while the very top of the market make nearly all the profits. Essentially, the app economy has become a mirror of Wall Street. The application store model was a good thing for a while, especially early on. Now, though, it's becoming an impediment. Supply has increased so much that it's impossible to stand out, especially now that a relatively small number of big players are utterly dominating the listings, drowning out everyone else. If nobody does anything, this will only get worse.

*And then there were three*

Friday 25th of July 2014 11:37:25 AM
I'm lucky. My financial situation allows me to buy several phones and tablets every year to keep up with the goings-on of all the major - and some of the minor - platforms currently competing for prime real estate in your precious pockets. It also means that I am lucky from a psychological point of view - by being able to buy several devices every year, I never fall into the all-too-common trap of choice-supportive bias. I don't have to rationalise my device purchases after the fact, so I won't have to employ all sorts of mental gymnastics to solve any states of cognitive dissonance caused by hardware and software flaws - the number one cause of irrational fanboyism. And so, I try to rotate my phone of choice around as much as possible. I enjoy jumping from Android to my N9, then onwards to Sailfish, back to Android, and then have some fun with Symbian on my E7 - and beyond. I've got a long list of platforms I want to add to the collection - one white BlackBerry Passport please - but in general, I'm pretty well-rounded. Read more on this exclusive OSNews article...

More in Tux Machines

It's Elementary, with Sparks, and Unity

In today's Linux news Jack Wallen review Elementary OS and says it's not just the poor man's Apple. Jack Germain reviewed SparkyLinux GameOver yesterday and said it's a win-win. Linux Tycoon Bryan Lunduke testdrives Ubuntu's Unity today in the latest entry in his desktop-a-week series. And finally tonight, just what the heck is this Docker thing everybody keeps talking about? Read more

5 Linux distributions for very old computers

This is part 4 in a series of articles designed to help you choose the right Linux distribution for your circumstances. Here are the links to the first three parts: Which desktop environment should you use? 5 easiest to use Linux distributions for modern machines 5 easiest to use Linux distributions for older machines Some of you will have computers that are really old and none of the solutions presented thus far are of much use. This guide lists those distributions designed to run with limited RAM, limited disk space and limited graphics capabilities. Ease of use is sometimes comprimised when using the really light distributions but once you get used to them they are every bit as functional as a Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Read more

Open source software: The question of security

The logic is understandable - how can a software with source code that can easily be viewed, accessed and changed have even a modicum of security? opensource-security-question Open source software is safer than many believe. But with organizations around the globe deploying open source solutions in even some of the most mission-critical and security-sensitive environments, there is clearly something unaccounted for by that logic. According to a November 28 2013 Financial News article, some of the world's largest banks and exchanges, including Deutsche Bank and the New York Stock Exchange, have been active in open source projects and are operating their infrastructure on Linux, Apache and similar systems. Read more