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Exploring the Future of Computing
Updated: 1 hour 29 min ago

Chinese mobile application UI trends

Monday 1st of December 2014 06:19:40 PM
One day, for the fun of it, I started writing a list in my notebook of all the things that are different between apps here and those I'm accustomed to using and creating back in the US. When I finished, I was surprised by how long the list was, so it seemed fitting to flesh it out into a post. Very interesting for anyone thinking of developing software in or for China.

Sony's unveils e-paper watch

Saturday 29th of November 2014 12:37:30 AM
Two days ago, we heard of Sony's plans to build a watch made entirely of e-paper - one where the band and the watch face would both change in response to the user's wrist gestures. It sounded wild and provocatively different, but what we really wanted to know was what it looked like. As it turns out, that watch is already in the public eye, though Sony's involvement had until now been kept clandestine so as to judge the product on its own merits. Say hello to the FES Watch. Certainly an interesting concept, but I'm not sure I like the entire band being e-paper - it just looks kind of like those glowsticks you can slap around your wrist that were cool when I was like 6.

OnePlus responds to Cyanogen's exclusive Micromax partnership

Saturday 29th of November 2014 12:34:56 AM
OnePlus has addressed its Indian users regarding the recent announcement that Cyanogen has made a deal with Indian handset manufacturer Micromax. The deal gives exclusive rights to Cyanogen's software to Micromax in India, leaving out the OnePlus One, which is powered by Cyanogen. Naturally, OnePlus expressed disappointment in the deal. Additionally, OnePlus says they are bewildered at this move by Cyanogen. The two companies have previously cooperated on the launch of the OnePlus One in 17 countries, including India. The company does say that the One will continue to receive software updates globally, but apologizes to Indian customers who feel deceived. What a mess.

Genode 14.11 features the Intel wireless stack

Friday 28th of November 2014 04:49:09 PM
The just released version 14.11 of the Genode OS framework complements the framework's arsenal of device drivers with the Intel wireless stack. This way, Genode enables the realization of microkernel-based systems on modern laptops without relying on any kind of "device-driver OS" or "Dom0". Other highlights of the release are a new dynamic linker, VirtualBox 4.3.16 on the NOVA hypervisor, a new scheduler for the HW kernel, and networking for the Raspberry Pi. WiFi stacks are known to be extremely complex. In the Linux kernel, it is certainly one of the most sophisticated driver subsystems besides GPU drivers. From the perspective of an alternative OS, it is quite frightening. On the other hand, WiFi is an universally required feature for a general-purpose OS by today's standards. Therefore, the Genode project had to face the issue to enable a full WiFi stack on top of the framework sooner or later. In spring this year, the Genode team finally took on the engineering feat to transplant the Intel wireless stack from Linux to a user-level component on Genode. This line of work was more demanding than originally anticipated. The biggest hurdle was to get a grasp on the interactions between the various involved protocols and mechanisms such as mac80211, cfg80211, nl80211, the netlink API, AF_NETLINK, and the WPA supplicant. The actual porting work followed the approach of prior porting efforts like the Linux USB and TCP/IP subsystems. All Linux kernel threads are executed by a single user-level thread that cooperatively schedules each kernel thread as a light-weight execution context. Compared to the prior porting efforts, the driver environment for the WiFi stack is far more complex. About 8,500 lines of environment code had to be provided to bring the 215,000 lines of WiFi stack to life. However, almost no original code had to be changed, which will make future updates relatively easy. From its very beginning, Genode was designed to manage resources via a trading mechanism. For example, when a client component connects to a server component, it can provide a part of its own memory budget to the server. This way, the server does not need to perform allocations from its own resources on behalf of its client, which mitigates the risk for denial-of-service attacks driven by malicious clients. This scheme works well for memory but it had not been employed for CPU time, yet. The reason was the lack of the scheduling facilities offered by the kernels supported by Genode. However, with their custom kernel called "base-hw", the Genode developers were finally able to pursue this idea. The outcome of this line of work is featured in the new release. Besides the WiFi stack and the new scheduler, Genode 14.11 comes with an upgrade of VirtualBox to version 4.3.16 that can be executed directly on the NOVA microhypervisor, a new dynamic linker, added GUI components, and networking support for the Raspberry Pi. The full story behind all those topics is covered by the release documentation.

Debian fork promises no systemd, asks for donations

Friday 28th of November 2014 12:09:46 AM
The Debian fork website, put together by the Veteran Unix Admins (VUA) group, has annouced the VUA has decided to fork the popular Debian GNU/Linux distribution. The VUA is critical of Debian's decision to adopt systemd as the distribution's default init software and to allow software packaged for Debian to depend directly on systemd. The VUA plans to create a fork of Debian using SysV Init as the default init software and is asking for donations to support the endevor. The default init system in the next Debian v8 "Jessie" release will be systemd, bringing along a deep web of dependencies. We need to individuate those dependencies, clean them from all packages affected and provide an alternative repository where to get them. The stability of our fork is the main priority in this phase. There has been a lot of debate over systemd in the Debian community in the past few months and it will be interesting to see if this non-systemd fork of Debian gains support.

Yandex' new browser is a bold UI experiment

Friday 28th of November 2014 12:09:00 AM
Russian internet giant Yandex has launched an alpha version of its new Chromium-based browser for Windows and Mac OS X that incorporates a few interesting ideas of how a modern browser might look. The main difference from the interface of Chrome or Firefox is the ultimate minimalism and the fact that the tabs are moved to the bottom of the page. It actually looks quite appealing. More information and download links can be found in Yandex' blog post.

Windows 10 bumps kernel version to 10.0

Thursday 27th of November 2014 03:24:44 PM
A long-standing oddity of Windows is that its branded number has for some years now not matched the version number stamped into the kernel and other parts of the operating system. Windows 7, for example, reported itself to software as being version 6.1. Windows 8 is 6.2, and Windows 8.1 is 6.3. Current public builds of Windows 10 repeat this trend - they purport to be version 6.4 - but not for much longer. Chinese site ITHome published a picture showing the version number to be 10.0. Version number 10.0 is also cropping up on BuildFeed which tracks build numbers, and has been further corroborated elsewhere. Interesting little tidbit of information.

Google should be broken up, say European MPs

Thursday 27th of November 2014 03:19:27 PM
The European Parliament has voted in favour of breaking Google up, as a solution to complaints that it favours is own services in search results. Politicians have no power to enforce a break-up, but the landmark vote sends a clear message to European regulators to get tough on the net giant. I'm glad they're keeping a close watch on these powerful companies, but a break-up? Good luck with that.

New ReactOS Explorer merged

Thursday 27th of November 2014 12:29:49 PM
The new ReactOS Explorer is much more compatible, stable, and comes with more features than the current (and now old) explorer. We expect it to be a big quality jump in terms of usability, and the rockstar feature of the upcoming 0.4 release. Just keep reading to discover more about it! The new shell has been merged today.

Businessweek on Anita Sarkeesian

Thursday 27th of November 2014 10:24:57 AM
"People are talking about women and games seriously; people are taking the critiques seriously," Sarkeesian says as she stirs her tea. "It's been a huge shift. This discussion is becoming more mainstream." A blond woman sitting at the next table before an array of New York City street maps begins squirming excitedly in her seat. "Are you talking about the article about gaming in the New York Times yesterday? I read it!" she says excitedly. "Did you write that? It was great!" Fantastic article, horrible title (hence why I'm using a generic placeholder title instead). She's not gaming's "greatest adversary". In fact, Sarkeesian - and people like her, trying to create more diversity in every aspect of gaming - are gaming's greatest asset.

DragonFly BSD 4.0 released

Wednesday 26th of November 2014 08:55:59 PM
The DragonFly BSD operating system is a server oriented project. Though originally forked from FreeBSD, DragonFly BSD is an independent operating system that carries a number of unique features, foremost among them is the HammerFS file system. DragonFly BSD 4.0 was released on November 25th and offers several new features. Version 4 of DragonFly brings Haswell graphics support, 3D acceleration, and improved performance in extremely high-traffic networks. DragonFly now supports up to 256 CPUs, Haswell graphics (i915), concurrent pf operation. The latest version of DragonFly BSD no longer supports 32-bit x86 machines and is designed to work exclusively on the 64-bit x86 architecture.

Apple could ditch Google for Bing or Yahoo next year

Tuesday 25th of November 2014 11:38:14 PM
Google risks losing its spot as the default search provider in Apple's Safari browser next year, according to a report from The Information. The latest extension of a deal that's put Google Search in the hands of iPhone owners since 2007 is set to expire in 2015, and Mountain View rivals Microsoft and Yahoo are already making a case for change with Apple's leadership. Per the report, each company has pitched Apple SVP Eddy Cue on the idea of replacing Google as the default iOS search provider; Microsoft wants Bing to be the default option out of the box, and Yahoo is vying for the same spot. This will be an interesting claim of Apple's claim that they care about consumers. If they renew the deal, they place their customer's interests first, because their customers massively prefer Google Search. However, if they ditch Google and replace it with some inferior nonsense like Bing or Yahoo, they care more about their personal vendetta than their customers' best interests. If they go the privacy angle, switching to Bing or Yahoo is even more laughable, since those companies track just as much as Google does. If Apple opts for DDG as default - well, then they earn some respect.

God's lonely programmer

Tuesday 25th of November 2014 08:49:57 PM
TempleOS is more than an exercise in retro computing, or a hobbyist's space for programming close to the bare metal. It's the brainchild - perhaps the life's work - of 44-year-old Terry Davis, the founder and sole employee of Trivial Solutions. For more than a decade Davis has worked on it; today, TempleOS is 121,176 lines of code, which puts it on par with Photoshop 1.0. (By comparison, Windows 7, a full-fledged modern operating system designed to be everything to everyone, filled with decades of cruft, is ​about 40 million lines.) If you read just one article today, make sure it's this one.

FreeBSD improves arm64 support

Tuesday 25th of November 2014 08:46:52 PM
The FreeBSD Foundation published a report yesterday on the status of FreeBSD running on 64-bit ARM processors. Work to port FreeBSD to the 64-bit ARM architecture has been progressing quickly and it is now possible to boot a FreeBSD installation into single user mode on the young architecture. The kernel bring-up portion of the project is nearing completion; FreeBSD/arm64 boots to single-user mode on ARM's reference simulator. Work is underway on the remaining kernel drivers, and on userland support. This project's overall goal is to bring FreeBSD/arm64 to a Tier-1 status, including release media and prebuilt package sets. More information about the arm64 port can be found on the FreeBSD wiki.

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Enterprise Advances Brought Linux Success in 2014

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