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qoob – excellent foobar-like music player for Linux

6 hours 48 sec ago

Are you debilitated by the countless music players that use web technologies with a massive RAM footprint? Maybe you want a lean yet slick audio player with a good range of features?

The post qoob – excellent foobar-like music player for Linux appeared first on LinuxLinks.

What are good command line HTTP clients?

Thursday 21st of February 2019 11:11:19 AM

This article looks at 4 open source command line HTTP clients. These clients let you download files off the internet over the command line. But they can also be used for many more interesting purposes such as testing, debugging and interacting with HTTP servers and web applications.

The post What are good command line HTTP clients? appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Essential System Tools: QDirStat – Excellent Qt-based directory statistics

Wednesday 20th of February 2019 01:06:06 PM

QDirStat is an open source graphical application to show where your disk space has gone and to help you to clean up the mess. It fully merits its inclusion in our Essential System Tools feature.

The post Essential System Tools: QDirStat – Excellent Qt-based directory statistics appeared first on LinuxLinks.

5 Excellent Free Mind Mapping Software

Tuesday 19th of February 2019 07:00:40 AM

A mind map is a diagram used to visually organize information. Mind mapping is a fairly free flowing concept. This means you need software that is versatile, and can adapt to your requirements. Your idea of a neat and tidy mind map might be another person's idea of bamboozling.

The post 5 Excellent Free Mind Mapping Software appeared first on LinuxLinks.

5 Best Free Linux Typing Tutors

Monday 18th of February 2019 08:33:15 AM

Typing tutor software teaches fast and accurate typing through a system of informative lessons and progress tracking. We think it is important that learning should be fun, so we have included some typing games in this feature.

To provide an insight into the quality of software available, we have compiled a list of 5 excellent typing tutors. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone looking to improve their typing skills.

The post 5 Best Free Linux Typing Tutors appeared first on LinuxLinks.

14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools

Sunday 17th of February 2019 08:43:18 AM

Linux is well endowed with plotting software. There are some heavyweight commercial Linux applications which include plotting functionality. These include MATLAB, Maple, and Mathematica. However, we are fervent advocates of open source software. The purpose of this article is to help promote open source plotting tools.

The post 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools appeared first on LinuxLinks.

4 Excellent Command-line FTP clients

Saturday 16th of February 2019 09:28:44 AM

This article provides our pick of the best open source command line file transfer programs. The software featured here supports a number of different protocols, not just FTP. They offer shell-like command syntax, and are great for scripting purposes.

The post 4 Excellent Command-line FTP clients appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Latte – Excellent KDE Dock based on Plasma Frameworks

Friday 15th of February 2019 09:03:20 AM

Latte is a dock based on Plasma frameworks that aims to offer an elegant and intuitive experience for your tasks and KDE Plasma widgets. It animates its contents by using parabolic zoom effect and tries to be as unobtrusive is possible.

The post Latte – Excellent KDE Dock based on Plasma Frameworks appeared first on LinuxLinks.

8 Best Free Linux Food and Drink Software

Thursday 14th of February 2019 08:52:43 AM

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 6 high quality food and drink software. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone interested in keeping fit, making beer, or the art of cooking.

The post 8 Best Free Linux Food and Drink Software appeared first on LinuxLinks.

24 Excellent GNOME Extensions (Updated)

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 09:04:23 AM

Here's our recommended GNOME shell extensions. Most of the extensions are not officially supported by GNOME. But they all take the desktop to the next level, either by adding useful functionality, improving your workflow, or simply offering a touch of panache to the desktop. All the extensions all compatible with the latest release of GNOME. Naturally there's only open source goodness on offer.

The post 24 Excellent GNOME Extensions (Updated) appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Essential System Tools: QJournalctl – Graphical User Interface for systemd’s journalctl

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 07:22:15 AM

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities.

The post Essential System Tools: QJournalctl – Graphical User Interface for systemd’s journalctl appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Top 10 Free Linux Painting Tools

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 10:42:25 AM

Linux is a particularly strong platform for professionals that work within the graphic design and graphic arts industry. With low cost hardware, quality open source software, and an ounce of talent, artists can produce professional-looking computer graphics.

The post Top 10 Free Linux Painting Tools appeared first on LinuxLinks.

21 Excellent KDE Plasma Widgets

Monday 11th of February 2019 05:20:57 AM

KDE is most of the most popular desktop environments. It's also one of the most configurable. KDE widgets (sometimes called Plasmoids) help to improve the user experience. Here's my favorites.

The post 21 Excellent KDE Plasma Widgets appeared first on LinuxLinks.

10 Best Free Linux Synthesizers

Sunday 10th of February 2019 01:40:57 PM

Linux has a good range of open source software to be a serious contender in music production without having to venture into the commercial software world. Some of the software featured in this article provide operation similar to analog synths from the 1970s, such as the Moog Minimoog and Roland Juno-60.

The post 10 Best Free Linux Synthesizers appeared first on LinuxLinks.

8 Best Free Linux Webcam Tools (Updated 2019)

Saturday 9th of February 2019 01:14:42 PM

A webcam is a video capture device that is either connected to a computer directly (typically by USB) or over a computer network. Many modern netbooks and laptops have a built-in webcam.

Webcams spice up online communication by offering real-time video chat and webcasting. These tiny cameras enable users to chat in realtime with friends and family, send video email around the world, to videoconference with co-workers and clients, and even to broadcast a TV-like channel over the net.

The post 8 Best Free Linux Webcam Tools (Updated 2019) appeared first on LinuxLinks.

16 Best Linux IRC Clients (Updated 2019)

Saturday 9th of February 2019 07:06:16 AM

Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a form of real-time Internet text messaging (chat) or synchronous conferencing. IRC was born during summer 1988 when Jarkko Oikarinen wrote the first IRC client and server when he was working in the Department of Information Processing Science at the University of Oulu, Finland. This system enables millions of people around the world to communicate in real time. While IRC has lost some popularity, IRCv3 looks interesting with some advanced client features such as instant notifications, improved security and more.

The post 16 Best Linux IRC Clients (Updated 2019) appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Essential System Tools: f3 – detect and fix counterfeit flash storage

Friday 8th of February 2019 07:57:23 AM

f3 is a set of 5 open source utilities that detect and repair counterfeit flash storage. It achieves this by testing the flash cards' capacity and performance.

The post Essential System Tools: f3 – detect and fix counterfeit flash storage appeared first on LinuxLinks.

7 Excellent Console Linux File Managers (Updated 2019)

Thursday 7th of February 2019 09:22:08 AM

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 7 high quality console based open source file managers. Hopefully, there will be something of interest for anyone who wishes to revel in the power of the console.

The post 7 Excellent Console Linux File Managers (Updated 2019) appeared first on LinuxLinks.

7 Useful Free Graphical User Interfaces for R

Thursday 7th of February 2019 08:23:57 AM

R is an open source programming language and software environment for statistical computing and graphics. It consists of a language together with a run-time environment with a debugger, graphics, access to system functions, and scripting.

To provide an insight into the quality of software available for Linux, we have compiled a list of 7 of the best graphical user interfaces for R.

The post 7 Useful Free Graphical User Interfaces for R appeared first on LinuxLinks.

aux.app – desktop music player

Wednesday 6th of February 2019 07:20:20 AM

aux.app plays music from YouTube, SoundCloud and Deezer. It's built with web technologies including Electron. How does it fare?

The post aux.app – desktop music player appeared first on LinuxLinks.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Clear Linux Has A Goal To Get 3x More Upstream Components In Their Distro
    For those concerned that running Clear Linux means less available packages/bundles than the likes of Debian, Arch Linux, and Fedora with their immense collection of packaged software, Clear has a goal this year of increasing their upstream components available on the distribution by three times. Intel Fellow Arjan van de Ven provided an update on their bundling state/changes for the distribution. In this update he shared that the Clear Linux team at Intel established a goal this year to have "three times more upstream components in the distro. That's a steep growth, and we want to do that with some basic direction and without reducing quality/etc. We have some folks figuring out what things are the most desired that we lack, so we can add those with most priority... but this is where again we more than welcome feedback."
  • The results from our past three Linux distro polls
    You might think this annual poll would be fairly similar from year to year, from what distros we list to how people answer, but the results are wildly different from year to year. (At the time of the creation of each poll, we pull the top 15 distributions according to DistroWatch over the past 12 months.) Last year, the total votes tallied in at 15,574! And the winner was PCLinuxOS with Ubuntu a close second. Another interesting point is that in 2018, there were 950 votes for "other" and 122 comments compared to this year with only 367 votes for "other" and 69 comments.
  • Fedora Strategy FAQ Part 3: What does this mean for Fedora releases?
    Fedora operating system releases are (largely) time-based activity where a new base operating system (kernel, libraries, compilers) is built and tested against our Editions for functionality. This provides a new source for solutions to be built on. The base operating systems may continue to be maintained on the current 13 month life cycle — or services that extend that period may be provided in the future. A solution is never obligated to build against all currently maintained bases.
  • How open data and tools can save lives during a disaster
    If you've lived through a major, natural disaster, you know that during the first few days you'll probably have to rely on a mental map, instead of using a smartphone as an extension of your brain. Where's the closest hospital with disaster care? What about shelters? Gas stations? And how many soft story buildings—with their propensity to collapse—will you have to zig-zag around to get there? Trying to answer these questions after moving back to earthquake-prone San Francisco is why I started the Resiliency Maps project. The idea is to store information about assets, resources, and hazards in a given geographical area in a map that you can download and print out. The project contributes to and is powered by OpenStreetMap (OSM), and the project's entire toolkit is open source, ensuring that the maps will be available to anyone who wants to use them.
  • Millions of websites threatened by highly critical code-execution bug in Drupal

    Drupal is the third most-widely used CMS behind WordPress and Joomla. With an estimated 3 percent to 4 percent of the world's billion-plus websites, that means Drupal runs tens of millions of sites. Critical flaws in any CMS are popular with hackers, because the vulnerabilities can be unleashed against large numbers of sites with a single, often-easy-to-write script.

  • Avoiding the coming IoT dystopia
    Bradley Kuhn works for the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) and part of what that organization does is to think about the problems that software freedom may encounter in the future. SFC worries about what will happen with the four freedoms as things change in the world. One of those changes is already upon us: the Internet of Things (IoT) has become quite popular, but it has many dangers, he said. Copyleft can help; his talk is meant to show how. It is still an open question in his mind whether the IoT is beneficial or not. But the "deep trouble" that we are in from IoT can be mitigated to some extent by copyleft licenses that are "regularly and fairly enforced". Copyleft is not the solution to all of the problems, all of the time—no idea, no matter how great, can be—but it can help with the dangers of IoT. That is what he hoped to convince attendees with his talk. A joke that he had seen at least three times at the conference (and certainly before that as well) is that the "S" in IoT stands for security. As everyone knows by now, the IoT is not about security. He pointed to some recent incidents, including IoT baby monitors that were compromised by attackers in order to verbally threaten the parents. This is "scary stuff", he said.

KDE: Slackware's Plasma5, KDE Community 'Riot' (Matrix), Kdenlive Call for Testers/Testing

  • [Slackware] Python3 update in -current results in rebuilt Plasma5 packages in ktown
    Pat decided to update the Python 3 to version 3.7.2. This update from 3.6 to 3.7 broke binary compatibility and a lot of packages needed to be rebuilt in -current. But you all saw the ChangeLog.txt entry of course. In my ‘ktown’ repository with Plasma5 packages, the same needed to happen. I have uploaded a set of recompiled packages already, so you can safely upgrade to the latest -current as long as you also upgrade to the latest ‘ktown’. Kudos to Pat for giving me advance warning so I could already start recompiling my own stuff before he uploaded his packages.
  • Alternatives to rioting
    The KDE Community has just announced the wider integration of Matrix instant messaging into its communications infrastructure. There are instructions on the KDE Community Wiki as well. So what’s the state of modern chat with KDE-FreeBSD? The web client works pretty well in Falkon, the default browser in a KDE Plasma session on FreeBSD. I don’t like leaving browsers open for long periods of time, so I looked at the available desktop clients. Porting Quaternion to FreeBSD was dead simple. No compile warnings, nothing, just an hour of doing some boilerplate-ish things, figuring out which Qt components are needed, and doing a bunch of test builds. So that client is now available from official FreeBSD ports. The GTK-based client Fractal was already ported, so there’s choices available for native-desktop applications over the browser or Electron experience.
  • Ready to test [Kdenlive]?
    If you followed Kdenlive’s activity these last years, you know that we dedicated all our energy into a major code refactoring. During this period, which is not the most exciting since our first goal was to simply restore all the stable version’s features, we were extremely lucky to see new people joining the core team, and investing a lot of time in the project. We are now considering to release the updated version in April, with KDE Applications 19.04. There are still a few rough edges and missing features (with many new ones added as well), but we think it now reached the point where it is possible to start working with it.

Preliminary Support Allows Linux KVM To Boot Xen HVM Guests

As one of the most interesting patch series sent over by an Oracle developer in quite a while at least on the virtualization front, a "request for comments" series was sent out on Wednesday that would enable the Linux Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) to be able to boot Xen HVM guests. The 39 patches touching surprisingly just over three thousand lines of code allow for Linux's KVM to run unmodified Xen HVM images as well as development/testing of Xen guests and Xen para-virtualized drivers. This approach is different from other efforts in the past of tighter Xen+KVM integration. Read more

Servers: Kubernetes, SUSE Enterprise Storage and Microsoft/SAP

  • Kubernetes and the Cloud
    One of the questions I get asked quite often by people who are just starting or are simply not used to the “new” way things are done in IT is, “What is the cloud?” This, I think, is something you get many different answers to depending on who you ask. I like to think of it this way: The cloud is a grouping of resources (compute, storage, network) that are available to be used in a manner that makes them both highly available and scalable, either up or down, as needed. If I have an issue with a resource, I need to be able to replace that resource quickly — and this is where containers come in. They are lightweight, can be started quickly, and allow us to focus a container on a single job. Containers are also replaceable. If I have a DB container, for instance, there can’t be anything about it that makes it “special” so that when it is replaced, I do not lose operational capability.
  • iSCSI made easy with SUSE Enterprise Storage
    As your data needs continue to expand, it’s important to have a storage solution that’s both scalable and easy to manage. That’s particularly true when you’re managing common gateway resources like iSCSI that provide interfaces to storage pools built in Ceph. In this white paper, you’ll see how to use the SUSE Enterprise Storage openATTIC management console to create RADOS block devices (RBDs), pools and iSCSI interfaces for use with Linux, Windows and VMware systems.
  • Useful Resources for deploying SAP Workloads on SUSE in Azure [Ed: SUSE never truly quit being a slave of Microsoft. It's paid to remain a slave.]
    SAP applications are a crucial part of your customer’s digital transformation, but with SAP’s move to SAP S/4HANA, this can also present a challenge.