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Linux at Home: Research Your Family Tree

Friday 3rd of July 2020 09:48:43 AM

The Linux at Home feature continues with a great pastime - researching your family tree.

The post Linux at Home: Research Your Family Tree appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Spotlighting the Top Open Source Crafting Tools

Thursday 2nd of July 2020 05:16:42 PM

Handicraft is a term that describes many different types of work where practical and decorative objects are made by hand or by using only simple tools. Depending on your location, the phrase 'arts and crafts' may be more commonly used.

The post Spotlighting the Top Open Source Crafting Tools appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Manage your Personal Collections – Week 36

Wednesday 1st of July 2020 10:03:30 AM

For this week's blog, Luke looks at a few best-of-breed collection management programs. Free and open source goodness as usual.

The post Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Manage your Personal Collections – Week 36 appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn D

Tuesday 30th of June 2020 08:34:00 AM

D is a general-purpose systems programming language with a C-like syntax that compiles to native code. Here's our recommended free D tutorials.

The post Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn D appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux Cybersecurity: What You Need to Know

Monday 29th of June 2020 12:27:42 PM

Linux is an excellent choice for anyone who wants to improve their cybersecurity. Here's what you can do to improve your cybersecurity.

The post Linux Cybersecurity: What You Need to Know appeared first on LinuxLinks.

DownZemAll! – Qt-based download manager

Monday 29th of June 2020 08:03:08 AM

This article reviews DownZemAll! (DZA!), an open source standalone download manager.

The post DownZemAll! – Qt-based download manager appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux at Home: Embroidery design

Friday 26th of June 2020 08:28:58 AM

Continuing in our Linux at Home series, John looks at embroidery software. Embroidery is the craft of decorating fabric or other materials using a needle to apply thread or yarn.

The post Linux at Home: Embroidery design appeared first on LinuxLinks.

9 Best File Systems for Big Data

Thursday 25th of June 2020 06:11:04 AM

This feature highlights the finest open source file systems designed to cope with the demands imposed by Big Data.

The post 9 Best File Systems for Big Data appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Terminal Emulators – Week 35

Wednesday 24th of June 2020 08:42:17 AM

For this week's blog, Luke examines terminal emulators on the Raspberry Pi 4.

The post Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Terminal Emulators – Week 35 appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Dylan

Tuesday 23rd of June 2020 12:18:06 PM

Dylan is a multi-paradigm programming language that includes support for functional and object-oriented programming (OOP). Here's our recommended free tutorials to master Dylan.

The post Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Dylan appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Fraidycat – organize your content

Monday 22nd of June 2020 05:52:56 AM

Fraidycat acts as a central hub for internet content. It supports a wide variety of services including Twitter, YouTube, SoundCloud, web sites, and more.

The post Fraidycat – organize your content appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux at Home: Collaborating in real-time

Friday 19th of June 2020 06:54:22 AM

When you work remotely, collaborating with colleagues in real-time is much more efficient than corresponding via email. The software featured in this article lets you edit documents collaboratively in real-time.

The post Linux at Home: Collaborating in real-time appeared first on LinuxLinks.

6 Sparkling Command Line Interface (CLI) Linux Time Trackers

Thursday 18th of June 2020 07:01:11 AM

Time tracking software is a type of computer software that records time spent on tasks. This category of software can enable users to run billing reports, and prepare invoices for clients.

All of the time trackers featured in this roundup are console applications, using a command-line interface.

The post 6 Sparkling Command Line Interface (CLI) Linux Time Trackers appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Desktop Searching – Week 34

Wednesday 17th of June 2020 06:45:35 AM

For this week's Raspberry Pi 4 blog, Luke puts a desktop search tool under the microscope.

The post Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Desktop Searching – Week 34 appeared first on LinuxLinks.

4 Excellent Free Books to Learn Icon

Tuesday 16th of June 2020 11:12:29 AM

Icon is a high-level, general-purpose language that contains a wide variety of features for processing and presenting symbolic data — strings of characters and structures — both as text and as graphic images. Here's our recommended free books that'll help you master Icon.

The post 4 Excellent Free Books to Learn Icon appeared first on LinuxLinks.

33 Excellent GNOME Desktop Extensions (Updated 2020)

Monday 15th of June 2020 05:44:28 AM

Add additional functionality to a GNOME desktop with these great GNOME extensions. This roundup showcases 33 excellent GNOME extensions.

The post 33 Excellent GNOME Desktop Extensions (Updated 2020) appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux at Home: Explore the Universe from your Garden

Friday 12th of June 2020 06:34:25 AM

Astronomy is for everyone, and even with just the naked eye, it's a fascinating and rewarding hobby for life. Here's free software to get you started.

The post Linux at Home: Explore the Universe from your Garden appeared first on LinuxLinks.

12 Best Free Linux Time Tracking Software

Thursday 11th of June 2020 06:32:12 AM

Time tracking software is a type of computer software that records time spent on tasks. This category of software can enable users to run billing reports, and prepare invoices for clients.

The post 12 Best Free Linux Time Tracking Software appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Personal Information Managers – Week 33

Wednesday 10th of June 2020 07:29:52 AM

For this week's Raspberry Pi 4 blog, Luke examines selected personal information managers.

The post Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Personal Information Managers – Week 33 appeared first on LinuxLinks.

4 Excellent Free Books to Learn Agda and Type Theory

Tuesday 9th of June 2020 05:31:25 AM

Agda is a dependently typed functional programming language based on intuitionistic Type Theory. Here's our recommended free books to learn about Agda and Type Theory.

The post 4 Excellent Free Books to Learn Agda and Type Theory appeared first on LinuxLinks.

More in Tux Machines

libinput 1.16.0

libinput 1.16.0 is now available.

No significant changes since the second RC, so here's slightly polished RC1
announcement text.

This has been a long cycle, mostly because there weren't any huge changes on
the main development branch and a lot of the minor annoyances have found
their way into the 1.15.x releases anyway.

libinput now monitors timestamps of the events vs the current time when
libinput_dispatch() is called by the compositor. Where the difference
*may* result in issues, a (rate-limited) warning is printed to the log.
So you may see messages popping up in the form of
  "event processing lagging behind by XYZms, your system is too slow"
This is a warning only and has no immediate effect. Previously we would only
notice (and warn about) this when it affected an internal timer. Note that
these warnings do not show an issue with libinput, it shows that the the
compositor is not calling libinput_dispatch() quick enough.

The wheel tilt axis source was deprecated. No device ever had the required
udev properties set so we should stop pretending we support this.

Touchpads now support the "flat" acceleration profile. The default remains
unchanged and this needs to be selected in the configuration interface. The
"flat" profile applies a constant factor to movement deltas (1.0 for the
default speed setting).

Events from lid or tablet-mode switches that are known to libinput as being
unreliable are now filtered and no longer passed to the caller.
This prevents callers from receiving those known-bogus events and having to
replicate the same heuristics to identify unreliable devices that libinput
employs internally.

A new "libinput analyze" debugging tool is the entry tool for analysing
various aspects of devices. Right now the only tool is
"libinput analyze per-slot-delta" which can be used to detect pointer jumps
in a libiput record output. This tool used to live elsewhere, it was moved
to libinput so that reporters can easier run this tool, reducing the load on
the maintainers.

The tools have seen a few minor improvements, e.g.
- "libinput record touchpad.yml" does the right thing, no explicit --output
  argument required
- libinput measure touchpad-pressure has been revamped to be a bit more
  obvious
- libinput measure touchpad-size has been added (as replacement for the
  touchpad-edge-detector tool)
- libinput measure fuzz has been fixed to work (again and) slightly more
  reliable

The libinput test suite has been fixed to avoid interference with the
currently running session. Previously it was virtually impossible to work
while the test suite is running - multiple windows would pop up, the screen
would blank regularly, etc.

And of course a collection of fixes, quirks and new bugs.

As usual, see the git shortlog for details.

Diego Abad A (1):
      FIX: typo on building documentation

Peter Hutterer (2):
      test: semi-fix the switch_suspend_with_touchpad test
      libinput 1.16.0

git tag: 1.16.0
Read more Also: >Libinput 1.16 Released - Ready To Warn You If Your System Is Too Slow

18 Frameworks, Libraries, and Projects for Building Medical Applications

Open-source is not just a license or a code-based that left free on an online repository, It's a complete concept which comes with several advantages. Moreover, the most advantage you can get from Open-source is beyond the open-code it's FREEDOM; freedom to use or re-shape it as you see fit within your project commercial or otherwise, and that depends on the license of course. You are free from the headache of license conflict legal problems but also from the dilemma of dealing with restrections and limitations which come with property licenses. You are free from the system lock-in schemes, furthermore, you own your data, and freedom to customize the software as your structure requires and workflow demands. The Community: The Open-source project gains a powerful community as they gain users, the community users vary between advanced users, end-users, developers and end-users on decision-making level. Many of the community users are providing quality inputs from their usage and customized use-case and workflow or test-runs, Furthermore, they always have something to add as new features, UI modification, different usability setup, and overall introducing new workflows and tools, and That's what makes the progress of the open-source different than non-free solutions. While, Good community means good support, The community is a good resource to hire advanced users, developers, and system experts. It also provides alternative options when hiring developers. Unlike non-free software which are not blessed with such communities and where the options there are limited, The rich open-source community provides rich questions and answers sets that contributed by users from all around the world. Higher education value for the in-house team The open-source concept itself provides educational value, I owe most of what I know to open-source communities.The access to the source code and open-channels communication with the core developers is the best educational value any developer can get. Read more

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