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Updated: 2 hours 43 min ago

Linux Candy: Ternimal – animated lifeform in the terminal

Friday 18th of October 2019 09:14:24 AM

Ternimal simulates a lifeform in the terminal using Unicode block symbols. It's a script written in Rust with no dependencies and consumes few resources.

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Excellent Free Books to Learn VimL

Thursday 17th of October 2019 08:49:01 AM

VimL is a powerful scripting language of the Vim editor. You can use this dynamic, imperative language to design new tools, automate tasks, and redefine existing features of Vim. Here's our recommended free VimL books.

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6 Excellent Free Linux Reference Management Tools

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 04:35:29 PM

Reference management software is software for academics and authors to use to record and use bibliographic citations. This type of software typically uses a database to store the bibliographic references, together with a system for filtering the list in a format needed desirable to scholarly journals and publishers.

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Excellent Free Books to Learn Erlang

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 01:21:29 PM

Erlang is a general-purpose, concurrent, declarative, functional programming language and runtime environment developed by Ericsson. Here's our recommended free books for you to add another language to your bow!

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starship – elegant cross-shell prompt at your fingertips

Monday 14th of October 2019 10:14:17 AM

starship is an intelligent and non-intrusive prompt for anyone who spends time at a shell. It's free and open source software. Read our verdict.

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kitty – hardware-accelerated terminal emulator

Friday 11th of October 2019 06:10:25 AM

kitty offers GPU-acceleration and is targeted at power keyboard users. It's billed as a modern, hackable, featureful, OpenGL based terminal emulator. Here's a concise review of this terminal emulator.

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Excellent Free Books to Learn BASIC

Thursday 10th of October 2019 06:06:51 AM

BASIC (Beginner’s All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) is a family of general-purpose, high-level programming languages whose design philosophy emphasizes ease of use.

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Top Photo Metadata Editors (Updated 2019)

Wednesday 9th of October 2019 06:48:33 AM

A metadata editor is computer software which allows users to view and edit metadata tags interactively and save them in the graphics file. So, metadata is information that is part of the image file and contains information about the image itself and the creation of the image. It can set textual information such as title, description, exposure time, ISO value, focal length, and copyright.

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7 Excellent Free Books to Learn HTML

Tuesday 8th of October 2019 06:04:40 AM

HyperText Markup Language (HTML) is used to create web pages and other information that is intended for display in a web browser.

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Linux Candy: cacafire – Color ASCII Fire

Monday 7th of October 2019 07:12:35 AM

The nights are drawing in. You want to feel warm and toasty. And nothing beats a log fire. cacafire displays burning ASCII art flames.

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Excellent Utilities: Ananicy – auto nice daemon

Friday 4th of October 2019 06:43:39 AM

Ananicy is a shell daemon created to manage processes' IO and CPU priorities, with community-driven set of rules for popular applications. Here's our review of this free and open source program.

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7 Excellent Free Books to Learn Forth

Thursday 3rd of October 2019 06:55:14 AM

Forth is an imperative stack-based programming language, and a member of the class of extensible interactive languages. Here's our recommended free books to learn Forth.

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13 Python Natural Language Processing Tools

Wednesday 2nd of October 2019 03:47:33 PM

Natural language processing (NLP) is an exciting field of computer science, artificial intelligence, and computational linguistics concerned with the interactions between computers and human (natural) languages. It includes word and sentence tokenization, text classification and sentiment analysis, spelling correction, information extraction, parsing, meaning extraction, and question answering.

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14 Excellent Free Books to Learn Prolog

Tuesday 1st of October 2019 08:06:15 AM

Prolog is a general purpose, declarative, logic programming language, often associated with artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, intelligent database retrieval, and problem solving. Read about our recommended free Prolog books.

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Linux Candy: ponysay – cowsay reimplemention for ponies

Monday 30th of September 2019 12:50:58 PM

ponysay is a rewrite of cowsay with lots of full-color characters from My Little Pony. There's over 400 characters and character combinations.

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8 Excellent Java Natural Language Processing Tools

Friday 27th of September 2019 08:58:46 AM

Natural language processing (NLP) is an exciting field of computer science, artificial intelligence, and computational linguistics concerned with the interactions between computers and human (natural) languages. It includes word and sentence tokenization, text classification and sentiment analysis, spelling correction, information extraction, parsing, meaning extraction, and question answering.

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7 Excellent Free Books to Learn Scheme

Thursday 26th of September 2019 06:49:13 AM

Scheme is a general-purpose, functional, programming language descended from Lisp and Algol. It is a statically scoped and properly tail-recursive dialect of Lisp.

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8 Best Free Linux Camera Tools

Wednesday 25th of September 2019 06:55:35 AM

Linux offers excellent software for dealing with RAW files, for remotely operating cameras, importing and processing raw data, as well as software to read, write and edit camera metadata.

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12 Excellent Free Books to Learn Ada

Tuesday 24th of September 2019 06:41:50 AM

Ada is a structured, statically typed, imperative, wide-spectrum, multi-paradigm, object-oriented high-level, ALGOL-like programming language, extended from Pascal and other languages. We recommend 12 free books to learn Ada.

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Excellent Utilities: Liquid Prompt – adaptive prompt for Bash & Zsh

Monday 23rd of September 2019 06:49:29 AM

Liquid Prompt gives you a nicely displayed prompt with useful information when you need it. It shows you what you need when you need it.

The post Excellent Utilities: Liquid Prompt – adaptive prompt for Bash & Zsh appeared first on LinuxLinks.

More in Tux Machines

CentOS 8.0-1905

CentOS is a community-run project which builds its distribution from the source code of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The project's goal is to provide a binary compatible, nearly identical experience to Enterprise Linux, but without the commercial support provided by Red Hat. This makes CentOS an attractive option for people who want to have a distribution with long-term support and the same technology Red Hat provides, but feel they do not need vendor support. I reviewed Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL 8), briefly covering the distribution's installer, software and settings management, several of its Workstation features, and a few of its server technologies, such as Cockpit. I ran into several issues during that experience - some of them relating to documentation, some dealing with permission problems, some due to missing applications in the official repositories - and I was curious to see if CentOS would provide the same experience, problems and all. One could assume so given CentOS uses the same source code, but CentOS has its own website and repositories so I thought it would be worth giving it a test run and seeing what differences, if any, I could spot. In particular, I planned to focus on the strengths and weaknesses I observed in the conclusion of my RHEL 8 review. Before I get to my experiences with CentOS 8.0.1905, I feel it is worth mentioning that CentOS is now available in two branches: CentOS Linux, the traditional, fixed release operating system based on RHEL; and CentOS Stream. The new Stream branch is described as a rolling release platform which will fit in somewhere between Fedora and RHEL. The idea appears to be that software and concepts will get their initial testing in Fedora. Then Red Hat will fork a version of Fedora to be the basis of a future RHEL release. Changes and improvements that would normally be made internally within Red Hat prior to the next RHEL will become available for the public to try and comment on in CentOS Stream. Ideally, the plan here seems to be that this will give a larger portion of the community a chance to try new ideas and report issues, giving Red Hat more feedback and a chance to polish their commercial offering. Read more

Docker, Podman and Kubernetes

Graphics: Radeon, Mesa and More

  • Open-Source C.A.S. Vulkan Layer - Similar to Radeon Image Sharpening But For Any GPU

    AMD's Radeon Image Sharpening feature is designed to improve image quality with minimal performance costs. However, it is only supported by Radeon Polaris / Vega / Navi graphics cards and only under Microsoft Windows 10. An independent open-source project has implemented contrast adaptive sharpening support for Vulkan that is similar to Radeon Image Sharpening but will work for any Vulkan-enabled GPU -- including NVIDIA GPUs.

  • MSM+Freedreno Driver Stack Adding Support For The Adreno 510 GPU

    While the MSM+Freedreno open-source graphics driver stack already supports the Adreno 500 and 600 series, one of the GPUs not seeing support until now was the basic Adreno 510. Kernel patches are pending for A510 enablement while the Mesa support was already merged. The Adreno 510 is the graphics processor within the Snapdragon 650, 652, and 653 models and used in lower-end devices. With the kernel and Mesa patches, the Adreno 510 is now working on the likes of the Sony Xperia X and X Compact smartphones.

  • AMD Lands Greater Direct State Access Support Within Mesa

    Landing this week in Mesa 19.3-devel were more functions being implemented around the big OpenGL EXT_direct_state_access extension. OpenGL's direct state access functions are intended to allow more OpenGL state to be accessed/updated directly aside form the selector commands. Using EXT_direct_state_access allows for various efficiency improvements.

Programming Leftovers

  • Codeplay Launches Open-Source 'SYCL Academy' To Learn This Increasingly Popular Standard

    While SYCL has been around for five years as a Khronos standard providing a single-source C++ programming model for exploiting OpenCL, it has yet to reach its prime but demand for it is picking up with Intel working to upstream their SYCL back-end in LLVM, SYCL becoming part of their programming model with oneAPI and Xe Graphics, and other vendors also jumping on the SYCL bandwagon. Codeplay has now provided an open-source SYCL learning code for those interested in this higher-level alternative to straight OpenCL programming.

  • Open-Source Build and Test Tool Bazel Reaches 1.0

    Derived from Google's internal build tool Blaze, Bazel is a build and test tool that offers a human-readable definition language and is particularly aimed at large, multi-language, multi-repositories projects. Originally open-sourced in 2015, Bazel has now reached 1.0. One of the major implications of reaching version 1.0 for Bazel is the promise of greater stability and backward-compatibility guarantees. This has been a historical pain point for Bazel users, who often found themselves in the situation of having to rewrite part of their build rules due to frequent breaking changes in Bazel or its ecosystem. Accordingly, the Bazel team has committed to following semantic versioning for future Bazel releases, meaning only major versions will be allowed to include breaking changes. Furthermore, the team committed to maintaining a minimum stability window of three months between major versions.

  • DevOps Deeper Dive: DevOps Accelerates Open Source Innovation Pace

    That rate of innovation has increased dramatically in the last few years. However, much of that innovation would not have been possible if large swaths of the open source community hadn’t been able to employ best DevOps practices to collaborate, said CloudBees CEO Sacha Labourey. [...] None of this shift has been lost on IT vendors. As the demand for proprietary code slackened, many found it profitable to offer support services for open source software. The more there is to consume, the more the support services contracts grew. Now every vendor from IBM to small IT services providers such as Fairwinds has launched open source projects that help drive demand for IT services expertise. “There’s pain around integrating a lot of disparate open source projects,” said Robert Brennan, director of open source software for Fairwinds. “Organizations may be getting software for free, but there’s usually not a lot of help around.” Now almost every IT vendor in the world is making software engineers available to work on open source projects. All that talent focused on open source projects has led to the development of new platforms such as Jenkins, GitHub, Kubernetes and, more recently, a raft of smaller projects. With the rise of containers and cloud-native applications, open source software projects are entering another era that will see many of those same software engineers leveraging DevOps practices more broadly to drive even more innovative projects at increasingly faster rates.

  • Find your next developer from open source communities

    Meanwhile, demand for data scientists is rising as companies seek AI-based solutions to stay competitive. Demand is reflected in salary offers. Companies competing to hire and retain data experts are offering on average more than US$100,000, making it one of the most highly paid professions in the States. For companies lacking the budget to hire or train in-house staff to fill the role, they may find themselves struggling with maintaining technological infrastructure or moving forward with plans for digitization. Therefore, open source learning and further development of communities could be the solution to this gap. An IBM grant to support open source communities such as Girls Who Code, a non-profit organization offering coding lessons for women in the US, is a step forward to filling in a shortage of software developers.