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Updated: 1 hour 11 min ago

TuxMachines: Canonical: GNOME Software, Buzzwords, Ubuntu Server, Themes and Zenkit

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 03:09:47 PM
  • Report from the GNOME Software design sprint

    A couple of weeks ago representatives from across Canonical met in London to talk about ideas to improve the user experience of GNOME Software. We had people from the store team, snap advocacy, snapd, design and from the desktop team. We were also fortunate enough to be joined by Richard Hughes representing upstream GNOME Software.

  • Emerging Trends in Financial Services: IoT, AI and Blockchain

    The answer has its roots at both an infrastructure level, where legacy technology is being replaced with something more akin to what is seen in challengers banks or in technology leaders from Silicon Valley, and in changing mentalities, where a new mindset can be just as important as the technology that’s adopted.

    Of course, to say that this is simply a technological problem is naive, often, technology implementation is the easy part, with the larger challenge coming with organisational acceptance of the need to change.

    Often, the case is that an organisation isn’t culturally ready for change, resulting in projects that fail and negatively impact the ability to evolve with an increasingly tumultuous market that is being impacted by regulatory changes and a technology revolution.

    Mark Baker, Field Product Manager at Canonical, said: “We tend to find that the technology is the easy part once we’ve got the business aligned around a common goal with common sets of objectives and accepting of the change.”

    However, once an organisation is culturally aligned around a common goal and is accepting of technological change, then it is possible to work with a technology partner like Canonical in order to deploying the technology simple.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 19 June 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team.

  • Simple Dark/Light GTK/Gnome Shell Theme for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver)

    There are many dark themes for GTK with a simple and good color scheme. But, I have been looking for a simple dark theme especially for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver). I tried many Dark themes on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and my mind was set on Qogir Dark theme.

    The simple design and the comfort of the dark colors scheme is quite amazing and gives a relief looking for the desktop environment. Qogir comes with a Dark and Light Theme for GTK 2.0 / GTK 3.0 and Gnome Shell. The Dark or the Light theme integration with the default installed applications such as Nautilus file manager, LibreOffice and Mozilla Firefox are quite good.

  • Zenkit: The influence of developer communities in progressing snaps

    Last month, Zenkit published their project management tool as a snap. For those not familiar with Zenkit, they introduced themselves in a guest blog at the time the snap was published which can be read here. Since then, we caught up with Philipp Beck, Full Stack Developer at Zenkit, to discover his opinion on snaps and the publishing experience.

    Philipp was introduced to snaps via a developer friend of his and could immediately appreciate the potential benefits for Zenkit to pursue and the advantages it would offer their users. For the former, Philipp comments: “The biggest draw for us was the ease at which we could reach a diverse range of Linux users, without having to specifically package Zenkit for each distribution. There are obvious benefits here in terms of time saved in updating multiple Linux packages too.”

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TuxMachines: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Updated

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 02:54:50 PM
  • Tumbleweed Delivers New Kernel, Applications, Plasma, libvirt

    The past week brought a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots and a bunch of new features and improvements for KDE users.

    Snapshot 20180618 updated just a few packages to include an updated GNU Compiler Collection 7, which fixes support for 32-bit AddressSanitizer with glibc 2.27+. Both perl-File-ShareDir and python-numpy were the other two packages that gave users minor fixes.

    The snapshots earlier in the week were more KDE centric. Snapshot 20180615 delivered KDE Applications 18.04.2. The updated applications focused on bugfixes, improvements and translations for Dolphin, Gwenview, KGpg, Kig, Konsole, Lokalize, Okular and many more. KGpg no longer fails to decrypt messages without a version header and image with Gwenview can now be redone after undoing them. The Linux Kernel jumped from 4.16.12 to 4.17.1 and fixed some btrfs and KVM issues. The newer kernel also ported an arm fix for HDMI output routing and fixed an atomic sequence handling with spi-nor and intel-spi. The hwinfo package tried a more aggressive way to catch all usb platform controllers with the 21.55 version. Libvirt 4.4.0 added support for migration of Virtual Machines with non-shared storage over Thread-Local Storage (TLS) and introduced a new virDomainDetachDevice Alias. Lenovo, HP and Dell tablets gaining greater support with the updated libwacom 0.30 package. Add support for PostgreSQL-style UPSERT were made available with sqlite3 3.24.0. Other tools like mercurial 4.6.1, snapper 0.5.5 were also updated in the snapshot.

  • OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Jumps On Linux 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Riding Well

    For users of openSUSE's Tumbleweed rolling-release Linux distribution, it's been a very busy month on the update front.

    Last week openSUSE Tumbleweed already upgraded to the phenomenal KDE Plasma 5.13 release as its default desktop along with KDE Applications 18.04.2.

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TuxMachines: CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 Released for Those Who Want to Run Linux Containers

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 02:54:15 PM

Coming about a month after the release of the CentOS Linux 7.5 (1804) operating system for 64-bit (x86_64), 32-bit (i386), ARM64 (AArch64), PowerPC 64-bit (ppc64), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (ppc64le), and ARM-hfp (armhfp) compatible machines, CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 (7.1805) is now available to download.

CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 (7.1805) is built from standard CentOS Linux 7 RPMs and the upstream packages included in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.5 operating system. CentOS Linux is a free and open-source computer operating system for desktops and servers that's always based on the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases.

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TuxMachines: Fedora Core OS: The New Upstream To Red Hat's CoreOS

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 02:51:32 PM

Not to be confused with Fedora Core going back to the early days of Fedora as a Red Hat project, but Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller has just announced Fedora CoreOS.

Fedora CoreOS is going to be the new upstream for CoreOS, which Red Hat acquired Core OS / Container Linux earlier this year. Matthew Miller expects that over the next year, Fedora Atomic Host will be replaced by "a new thing" combining the best of Container Linux and Project Atomic. With that new thing is Fedora CoreOS.

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Linux.com: Google’s Fuchsia Adds Emulator for Running Linux Apps

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 02:03:21 PM
Title: Google’s Fuchsia Adds Emulator for Running Linux Apps20 JunLearn more

Reddit: Sshuttle VPN Help

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 01:50:55 PM

Despite the fact that I'm on a Mac and this is a Linux subreddit, I don't know where else to post this. I've been trying to get Sshuttle VPN to work for a while, and while I'm no coding expert, I do like trying out VPN's, even if it makes use of the UNIX systems' packet design (Github, etc.)

So before I ask my question can I just ask....is Sshuttle actually supposed to change your IP? If not, I can stop trying.

submitted by /u/EPrimeTV
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Phoronix: Intel Hyper Threading Performance With A Core i7 On Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 01:43:35 PM
Following the news yesterday of OpenBSD disabling Intel Hyper Threading by default within its OS over security concerns and plans to disable Simultaneous Multi Threading for other processors/architectures too, here are some fresh Intel HT benchmarks albeit on Ubuntu Linux. The OpenBSD developer involved characterized HT/SMT as "doesn't necessarily have a positive effect on performance; it highly depends on the workload. In all likelihood it will actually slow down most workloads if you have a CPU with more than two cores." So here are some benchmarks using a current-generation Intel Core i7 8700K six-core processor with Hyper Threading.

Phoronix: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Jumps On Linux 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Riding Well

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 12:12:36 PM
For users of openSUSE's Tumbleweed rolling-release Linux distribution, it's been a very busy month on the update front...

LXer: A summer reading list for open organization enthusiasts

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 12:08:32 PM
The books on this year's open organization reading list crystallize so much of what makes "open" work: Honesty, authenticity, trust, and the courage to question those status quo arrangements that prevent us from achieving our potential by working powerfully together.These nine books—each one a recommendation from a member of our community—represent merely the beginning of an important journey toward greater and better openness.But they sure are a great place to start.read more

Phoronix: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Released With Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 12:04:12 PM
While Spectre and Meltdown mitigation has been available to RHEL6 users via kernel upgrades, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 is out today as the newest release while its bundled kernel features Retpolines and KPTI for mitigating against these CPU vulnerabilities...

LinuxToday: How To Check Which Groups A User Belongs To On Linux

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 12:00:00 PM

2DayGeek: Five ways to check which groups a user belongs to on Linux.

LXer: Linux Mint vs Ubuntu

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 10:54:12 AM
There probably aren't two Linux distributions more closely related than Ubuntu and Linux Mint. Actually, the two are so close to one another, there's serious debate about whether or not they are the same distribution.

Reddit: Flatpak in detail, part 2

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 10:37:15 AM

Phoronix: Linux Gets Experimental Support For In-Kernel Hibernation Encryption

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 10:12:53 AM
Intel's Chen Yu has sent out a set of patches providing experimental support for in-kernel encryption support for hibernation...

Phoronix: Going In-Depth With Flatpak For Sandboxed Application Packaging

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 10:04:42 AM
Red Hat / GNOME developer veteran Matthias Clasen has recently begun a series of blog posts going in-depth with Flatpaks for those wondering how this application deployment technology is taking over the Linux desktop...

Phoronix: X-Plane Flight Simulator Reports Linux Users At Just About 1%

Wednesday 20th of June 2018 09:50:52 AM
Laminar Research has published their latest usage statistics on the incredible X-Plane flight simulator software...

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KDE/Qt: Qt Contributor Summit 2018, Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt, FreeBSD, and Konsole

  • Qt Contributor Summit 2018
    One bit especially interesting is the graphics stack. Back in Qt 5.0, Qt took the liberty of limiting the graphics stack to OpenGL, but the world has changed since: On Windows the only proper stack is Direct3D 12, Apple introduced Metal and recently deprecated OpenGL and Vulkan is coming rather strong. It looks like embracing these systems transparently will be one of the most exciting tasks to achieve. From a KDE & Plasma perspective I don’t think this is scary, OpenGL is here to stay on Linux. We will get a Framework based on a more flexible base and we can continue pushing Plasma, Wayland, Plasma Mobile with confidence that the world won’t be crumbling. And with a bit of luck, if we want some parts to use Vulkan, we’ll have it properly abstracted already.
  • Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt
    These days, using the cloud for predictive maintenance, analytics or feature updates is a de facto standard in the automation space. Basically, any newly designed product has some server communication at its core. However, the majority of solutions in the field were designed and productized when communication technology was not at today’s level. Still, attempts are being made to attach connectivity to such solutions. The mission statement is to “cloudify” an existing solution, which uses some internal protocol or infrastructure.
  • KDE on FreeBSD – June 2018
    It’s been a while since I wrote about KDE on FreeBSD, what with Calamares and third-party software happening as well. We’re better at keeping the IRC topic up-to-date than a lot of other sources of information (e.g. the FreeBSD quarterly reports, or the f.k.o website, which I’ll just dash off and update after writing this).
  • Konsole’s search tool
    Following my konsole’s experiments from the past week I came here to show something that I’m working on with the VDG, This is the current Konsole’s Search Bar. [...] I started to fix all of those bugs and discovered that most of them happened because we had *one* search bar that was shared between every terminal view, and whenever a terminal was activated we would reposition, reparent, repaint, disconnect, reconnect the search bar. Easiest solution: Each Terminal has it’s own search bar. Setuped only once. The one bug I did not fix was the Opening / Closing one as the searchbar is inside of a layout and layouts would reposition things anyway. All of the above bugs got squashed by just moving it to TerminalDisplay, and the code got also much cleaner as there’s no need to manual intervention in many cases. On the review Kurt – the Konsole maintainer – asked me if I could try to make the Search prettier and as an overlay on top of the Terminal so it would not reposition things when being displayed.

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments. Until now, The Document Foundation only recommended the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite to bleeding-edge users while urging enterprises and mainstream users to use the well-tested LibreOffice LibreOffice 5.4 series, which reached end of life on June 11, 2018, with the last point release, LibreOffice 5.4.7. Read more

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

The Document Foundation informed Softpedia today about the general availability of the fifth point release of the LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite for all supported operating systems. LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments. Read more Direct: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.0.5