Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linuxinsight

Syndicate content
LinuxInsight - aggregated feeds
Updated: 22 min 56 sec ago

Reddit: Does disabling Java in LibreOffice settings still yield a perceptible boost in speed?

Monday 5th of September 2016 01:57:58 PM

I realized as I did this on a new box, that I've had this habit since before the Oracle debacle.

In the old days, it was most definitely a good idea, but these days, could it possibly be better to leave Java on?

submitted by /u/Locastor
[link] [comments]

Phoronix: Fedora 26 Is Scheduled To Be Released In Early June

Monday 5th of September 2016 01:52:10 PM
Fedora 26 was originally talked about for a May release, but the schedule approved Friday by the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee puts it for an early June debut...

LXer: GNOME 3.22 "Karlsruhe" Desktop Environment Gets Closer, Second Beta Out Now

Monday 5th of September 2016 01:15:14 PM
GNOME developer Matthias Clasen announced the second and last Beta release of the upcoming GNOME 3.22 "Karlsruhe" desktop environment.

Reddit: "20 Years of KDE" book released!

Monday 5th of September 2016 01:14:53 PM

Reddit: Several Linux Distros Cater To Deep Web Users

Monday 5th of September 2016 01:00:11 PM

Phoronix: Adobe Returns To Updating NPAPI/Linux Flash Player

Monday 5th of September 2016 12:52:57 PM
Adobe stopped updating its NPAPI-based Linux Flash Player four years ago and planned to stop supporting it entirely in 2017, but now the company has backtracked on those steps with a commitment to regularly update their NPAPI and PPAPI versions of the Flash Player for Linux...

LXer: 'I'm sorry, your lift has had a problem and had to shut down'

Monday 5th of September 2016 12:18:03 PM
More BSODs for your schadenfraudeIt's not only size that matters: sometimes, the context of a BSOD also makes it fun.…

TuxMachines: Look Ma, no hardware! Coding the Raspberry Pi in a web emulator

Monday 5th of September 2016 11:46:58 AM

Now you can code the Sense HAT for Raspberry Pi in an emulator in your web browser, without any hardware.

You may be familiar with the Sense HAT, an add-on board for the Raspberry Pi which was made especially for a space mission with British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake for Astro Pi. It's a great piece of hardware, very handy for data logging, science experiments, environmental analysis, games and more. It comes with a Python library making it work out-of-the-box. (See Exploring the Raspberry Pi Sense HAT and Experimenting with the Raspberry Pi Sense HAT).

read more

LXer: Look Ma, no hardware! Coding the Raspberry Pi in a web emulator

Monday 5th of September 2016 11:20:52 AM
Now you can code the Sense HAT for Raspberry Pi in an emulator in your web browser, without any hardware.read more

Reddit: Qt 5.8 Alpha released

Monday 5th of September 2016 11:14:21 AM

TuxMachines: Peppermint OS 7

Monday 5th of September 2016 10:28:13 AM

The latest release of Peppermint OS was launched back in June and I meant to take it for a test drive then. However, one exciting release after another distracted me until now. Peppermint is a project I pay attention to because it is one of the distributions I have had the most success with when it comes to transitioning people from Windows to Linux. Peppermint's lightweight nature, speed, relatively uncluttered interface and solid hardware support (thanks to its underlying Ubuntu base) have made it an attractive option. Peppermint OS 7 is based on packages available through the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS repositories with a few Linux Mint utilities added for flavour. Peppermint runs the LXDE desktop by default and version 7 offers users GPT, UEFI and Secure Boot support. The distribution is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds for the x86 architecture.

The ISO for the 64-bit build of Peppermint is approximately 1GB in size. Booting from this media displays a menu where we can choose to try the live desktop environment, launch the system installer or check the disc for defects. I took the live desktop option which loads LXDE. The desktop environment is presented with a panel along the bottom of the display. This panel contains our application menu, task switcher and the system tray. The application menu uses unusually large and bold fonts, making the text easy to read. On the desktop we find a single icon we can use to launch the distribution's system installer. The desktop uses a dark theme with brightly coloured icons. Personally, I like the bright icons on a dark background coupled with the large font. I found the combination made it easy to browse the application menu and find launchers I wanted to use.

read more

LXer: Skylake-H Mini-ITX SBC has 4 GbE, 4 USB 3.0, and 3 HD video ports

Monday 5th of September 2016 10:23:41 AM
Kontron’s Linux-friendly “mITX-SKL-H” is based on Intel Skylake-H processors, and offers generous helpings of GbE, HD graphics, SATA 3.0, USB 3.0, and PCIe. Intel’s 6th Gen Core “Skylake” processors launch last year precipitated a steady stream of announcements by makers of single board computers (SBCs) and computer-on-modules (COMs) aimed at industrial and embedded applications. To […]

TuxMachines: QtCon Ending

Monday 5th of September 2016 10:16:17 AM
  • QtCon Closing Keynote with Julia Reda MEP

    The talks are over after the three days of QtCon Akademy 2016 which means the BoF sessions and hacking days are about to begin. To close the talks at the conference we had a finishing keynote by Julia Reda, Member of the European Parliament and member of the Pirate Party.

    She began by saying that on a fundamental level government is all of us, and it provides the infrastructure for our culture. Software used by the government is also a public service and the only philosophy that takes responsibility for that is free and open source software. Getting governments to use free and open source software is more important then ever because of the importance of technology in society. Computers are no longer limited to some parts of our lives, they are integral to everything we do. She gave the example of the VW Dieselgate scandal which is linked to cars being computers on wheels. There are no check that the software that is tested by regulators is the same that is run by the car hardware. Another interesting aspect is limitations on diesel control can be turned off to save the engine which means in practice they do this a lot and don't even need to tell the regulators. VW had a function programmed into the car which turned off the fuel saving if it deviated from the testing procedures.

  • KDE Software Store to Soon Offer Downloads in Snap, Flatpak and AppImage Formats

    Ex-Kubuntu maintainer Jonathan Riddell is proud to report on the public availability of a new online service designed as a replacement for the services provided by openDesktop.org.

    Dubbed The KDE Store, the new software store is exactly that, a store where application developers can publish their open-source projects and share them with the world. Also known as KDE Software Store, the app sharing platform contains many of the code from the openDesktop.org website, which appears to no longer be functional.

  • Interviews with QtCon Stall Holders

    KDE Dot News sent its roving reporter Devaja round the stalls at QtCon to ask them what they were promoting and of their experience of the conference.

read more

LXer: Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 to Be Released on September 14, Add Numerous Improvements

Monday 5th of September 2016 09:06:36 AM
We've been asked by many of our readers what's going on with the development of the next major OTA software update for Canonical's Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system for Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices.

TuxMachines: Students take part in MIT workshop on open source software

Monday 5th of September 2016 09:04:33 AM

MIT Group of Academic and Research Institutes celebrated their 25th global Linux day and conducted various exciting programmes.

One day hands-on workshop on Linux was organized under the guidance of Professor Suresh Bhawar.

Vatsal Thakur, an IT expert from Mumbai conducted a seminar on career opportunities in open source software. He said, "Linux is used by big corporate houses as it drives fastest supercomputers and android mobiles. Hence, market requirement for skilled Linux people is huge."

Third year students Sanket Kolnurkar, Nihal Renu, Manpreet Singh, Gauri Bhalerao, Prathamesh Videkar assisted the workshop participants. Santosh Bhosle, Ex principal at MIT briefed students about the evolution of open source software. The members of teaching staff including Nilesh Patil, Hanumant Dharmadhikari Deepak Nehte, Kavita Bhosle and Bhakti Ahirwadkar were also present.

Also: AquaCrop-OS Provides Open-Source Tool for Ag Water Management

read more

More in Tux Machines

ownCloud Desktop Client 2.2.4 Released with Updated Dolphin Plugin, Bug Fixes

ownCloud is still alive and kicking, and they've recently released a new maintenance update of the ownCloud Desktop Client, version 2.2.4, bringing some much-needed improvements and patching various annoying issues. Read more

Early Benchmarks Of The Linux 4.9 DRM-Next Radeon/AMDGPU Drivers

While Linux 4.9 will not officially open for development until next week, the DRM-Next code is ready to roll with all major feature work having been committed by the different open-source Direct Rendering Manager drivers. In this article is some preliminary testing of this DRM-Next code as of 29 September when testing various AMD GPUs with the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM drivers. Linux 4.9 does bring compile-time-offered experimental support for the AMD Southern Islands GCN 1.0 hardware on AMDGPU, but that isn't the focus of this article. A follow-up comparison is being done with GCN 1.0/1.1 experimental support enabled to see the Radeon vs. AMDGPU performance difference on that hardware. For today's testing was a Radeon R7 370 to look at the Radeon DRM performance and for AMDGPU testing was the Radeon R9 285, R9 Fury, and RX 480. Benchmarks were done from the Linux 4.8 Git and Linux DRM-Next kernels as of 29 September. Read more

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss. Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient. Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting. The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better. Read more