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Updated: 10 min 44 sec ago

LXer: Apollo Lake 3.5-incher doubles down on security

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:43:26 PM
Kontron’s Linux-friendly, Intel Apollo Lake based “3.5″-SBC-APL” SBC features triple display support, a TPM 2.0 chip, and optional security services. Kontron’s 146 x 102mm “3.5″-SBC-APL” SBC expands upon the 14nm “Apollo Lake” Atom E3900 series and Celeron N3350 system-on-chips with an SBC focused on security. Other 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBCs include Portwell’s PEB-2773, Advantech’s MIO-5350 […]

Reddit: Mir will support Nvidia's EGL Streams

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:41:33 PM

TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:18:26 PM
  • IBM unveils Blockchain as a Service based on open source Hyperledger Fabric technology

    IBM unveiled its “Blockchain as a Service” today, which is based on the open source Hyperledger Fabric, version 1.0 from The Linux Foundation.

    IBM Blockchain is a public cloud service that customers can use to build secure blockchain networks. The company introduced the idea last year, but this is the first ready-for-primetime implementation built using that technology.

  • Software And Choice

    Some projects, whether intentionally (e.g., LLVM) or by accident (e.g., Linux) will grow beyond this scope (in those cases, vastly so). The question then becomes murkier. The two projects I've chosen for example here are both, I would say, "fork-proof" - LLVM has a very lenient code acceptance policy (see: all of the ghc-specific portions of the backend), while Linux has an extremely powerful module interface against which things can be built that do not merit inclusion into mainline. A user could fork LLVM, or Linux, but their version is extremely unlikely to become authoritative. Even if one does become authoritative, or close to it, that decision may also revert if the new fork does not live up to the quality standards of the old (I'm thinking about ffmpeg/libav here).

  • Hello FOSSASIA: Revisiting the event *and* the first program we write in C

    I was at FOSSAsia this weekend to deliver a workshop on the very basics of programming. It ended a pretty rough couple of weeks for me, with travel to Budapest (for Linaro Connect) followed immediately by the travel to Singapore. It seems like I don’t travel east in the timezone very well and the effects were visible with me napping at odd hours and generally looking groggy through the weekend at Singapore. It was however all worth it because despite a number of glitches, I had some real positives to take back from the conference.

  • Community leadership charts course for OpenStack

    Last week, about 40 people from the OpenStack Technical Committee, User Committee, Board of Directors and Foundation Staff convened in Boston to talk about the future of OpenStack. We candidly discussed the challenges we face as a community, but also why our mission to deliver open infrastructure is more important than ever.

    To kick things off, Mark Collier opened with a state of the union address, talking about the strength of our community, the number of users running OpenStack at scale across various industries and the progress we’ve made working across adjacent open source projects. OpenStack is one of the largest, global open source communities. In 2016 alone, we had 3,479 unique developers from dozens of countries and hundreds of organizations contribute to OpenStack, and the number of merged changes increased 26 percent year-over-year. The size and diversity of the OpenStack community is a huge strength, but like any large organization, scale presents its own set of challenges.

  • OpenStack® Board Elects Huawei as Platinum Member and H3C as Gold Member of the Foundation
  • Community leadership planning, new board members, and more OpenStack news
  • Open project collaboration from elementary to university classrooms

    In this article, we share our experiences: two examples of fostering creative collaboration among students from elementary school to higher education. Aria F. Chernik, an open educator and director of OSPRI (Open Source Pedagogy, Research + Innovation) at Duke University, introduces an open-by-design, learning innovation project at Duke. Anna Engelke, a tinkering and technology educator, speaks about using open pedagogy to design a Scratch-based maker club at a local elementary school.

  • Rcpp 0.12.10: Some small fixes

    The tenth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp just made it to the main CRAN repository providing GNU R with by now over 10,000 packages. Windows binaries for Rcpp, as well as updated Debian packages will follow in due course. This 0.12.10 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, the 0.12.8 release in November, and the 0.12.9 release in January --- making it the fourteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency.

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TuxMachines: Graphics in Linux

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:13:55 PM

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: Software

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:13:19 PM
  • Audacity 2.1.3 Released with Minor New Features
  • Kodi Is Getting A Proper Netflix Plugin

    The Kodi HTPC software will soon have a "real" Netflix plugin/add-on for making a better show/movie watching experience.

  • See Lyrics for Any Song on Spotify with This Ubuntu App

    It’s been several months since Spotify removed the lyrics function from it’s apps, and it shows no signs of returning soon. If you liked being able to tap a button to instantly see lyrics for the currently playing song, we’ve found a nifty little indicator applet that can help.

  • WordGrinder: Distraction-Free Writing From the Command Line

    A few months back while perusing the latest news from the open source media, I came across an article listing five favorite command line tools, or some such nonsense. It turned out that one of the items on the list was a command line “word processor,” WordGrinder, which the article’s writer claimed to be an uber-easy way to write from the command line.

    As it happened, I’d been looking for that very thing, so I immediately looked in the Mint/Ubuntu repositories, found it, installed it and took a look. Unfortunately, at the time I was busy, facing a couple of deadlines, so when I couldn’t figure the first thing out about it in five seconds or less, I closed the terminal and went to Bluefish to finish an article I was writing, while vowing to return to look further into WordGrinder as soon as I finished.

  • Calibre 2.82 Open-Source Ebook Manager Launches with Various Improvements

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal announced a new maintenance update of his open-source, free, cross-platform and powerful ebook library management software, versioned 2.82.

    Calibre 2.82 comes just one week after the previous point release, namely Calibre 2.81, which means that it's mostly a bugfix update that addresses various of the issues reported by users lately, and updates the supported news sources.

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Reddit: Started a XUbuntu seed server guys. Cheers for Linux

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:12:30 PM

Just started a small VPS server to seed XUbuntu. The VPS was sitting idle wasting the allocated bandwidth and I liked XUbuntu quite some so I started seeding :D

Also, I'm new here. Not sure if I can post this here; just wanted to tell it to someone :-)

submitted by /u/jockey0109
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: Leftovers: Gaming

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:12:18 PM
  • Some thoughts on 'Codex of Victory', the mix of turn-based and real time strategy

    It's a mix of turn-based battles with some real-time base building. The base building aspect is a little like XCOM 2 with a side-on view as you dig out rooms. The whole game feels like it was inspired by XCOM 1 & 2, as you send over units to different regions to perform missions. You even speed up time at will when outside of missions, so it's all very familiar.

  • Overload, the shiny new six-degree-of-freedom shooter has entered Early Access

    The game was funded thanks to Kickstarter, where the developers nabbed $306,537 from helpful people wanting to see it become a reality. It's also nice that another Kickstarter team actually managed day-1 Linux support.

    The team behind Overload actually has some of the originally Descent team and the co-founder of the studio even worked on Freespace 1 & 2, which are my two all time favourite space shooters. I'm really not surprised the game has already turned out so well!

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TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:11:36 PM
  • Hire a DDoS service to take down your enemies

    According to Neustar, almost three quarters of all global brands, organizations and companies have been victims of a DDoS attack. And more than 3,700 DDoS attacks occur each day.

  • Apollo Lake 3.5-incher doubles down on security

    Kontron’s Linux-friendly, Intel Apollo Lake based “3.5″-SBC-APL” SBC features triple display support, a TPM 2.0 chip, and optional security services.

  • Leading Linux distros dawdle as kernel flaw persists

    A local privilege esclation flaw has been fixed in the Linux kernel, but several upstream distributions have yet to release updates. Administrators should plan on mitigating the vulnerability on Linux servers and workstations themselves and monitor the distributions for their update plans.

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Linux.com: How to Reduce Stress and Achieve Development Nirvana

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:00:52 PM

Nirvana, in this plane of existence at least, is a state of contentment, according to Corey A. Butler, creator of the Fenix Web Server and Author.io, a venture that provides software and services for developers. In his talk at Node.js Interactive, Butler said there are two things that stand in the way of achieving a state of development nirvana: one is the time spent coding and thinking about code, and the other is stress.

Reddit: Where are the results for GSoC 2016 published?

Monday 20th of March 2017 02:00:23 PM

Reddit: Bash Script for GRUB Init Tunes

Monday 20th of March 2017 12:12:39 PM

I couldn't find a convenient way to make the GRUB_INIT_TUNE (probably because it's more novelty than anything else) and so I extended a bash script to accept a file or arguments that make them easier to make. It uses beep (which needed sudo for it's things).

Modified bash script

There is also an example file and the readme has a bit more of an explanation of the argument notation.

In general though, it's pretty much: ./grub_init_tune [tempo] <notation> <notation>...

The notation is <note>[#][octave]*[duration], so anything from E#, e#4, e616, e4, etc. is valid. The bare minimum is just to have the notes. If things like duration, octave, and tempo are missing, it uses the previous note's if available, otherwise it will use the default in the script.

I just thought I would post it up somewhere slightly more noticeable because it seemed nice enough to me.

submitted by /u/jurassicplayer
[link] [comments]

Reddit: Complete Linux noob looking for beginners guide

Monday 20th of March 2017 12:06:10 PM

Soo.. I'm mainly a windows person, I setup a few linux servers for work before. No biggie, lots of guides on things.

But I want to invest more time in learning Linux.

I don't know basic stuff like common cli commands or how to start a service without looking it up. Where does /r/Linux suggest to start?

I usually work with Ubuntu / CentOS

submitted by /u/BMWHead
[link] [comments]

LXer: WordGrinder: Distraction-Free Writing From the Command Line

Monday 20th of March 2017 11:57:38 AM
WordGrinder is an old fashioned command line program that doesn't try to do a lot of things. It's purpose is to get the job done, and stay out of the user's way while doing it.

TuxMachines: Yap Wen Jiun - the Android scientist

Monday 20th of March 2017 11:33:19 AM

WE live in a world where technology surrounds us.

The biggest piece of technology we use is possibly the smartphone. It’s like a computer in your hand and it’s handy for communication. The smartphone engine, which most people take for granted, is the operating system (OS). A local Android OS developer, Yap Wen Jiun, shares his thoughts on his field of choice.

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TuxMachines: Open source seen as door to digital innovation by decision-makers in Malaysia, survey finds

Monday 20th of March 2017 11:17:30 AM

According to a new Forrester Consulting survey in the Asia Pacific region, 76 percent of survey respondents in Malaysia view open source as computing as a door to business innovation, cost-saving and the forming of deeper customer experience.

Damien Wong (pic below), vice president and general manager, ASEAN, Red Hat, said, "It is encouraging to see IT decision makers in Malaysia thinking beyond the traditional approaches and taking a cue from the companies championing digital innovation through open source."

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TuxMachines: Linux, not Microsoft, the real winner of Windows Server on ARM

Monday 20th of March 2017 11:05:00 AM

Cutting to the heart of it, it doesn't actually matter if Microsoft releases Windows Server for ARM. Windows isn't the future and even Microsoft knows it. The upcoming availability of SQL server on Linux is all the proof we need that the game is over and, in the data centre at least, Microsoft didn't win.

Quite frankly, there's nothing wrong with that. Legacy x86 Windows applications have been a millstone around the neck of the entire industry for ages now and its long past time they were relegated to a niche and left to quietly slip away into the night. What's interesting here isn't that Microsoft managed to take its existing code base, strip out some of the cruft and compile it on ARM. What's interesting is what Microsoft's experiment unlocks outside the Windows ecosystem.

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LXer: Ancient Giant Penguin Unearthed in New Zealand

Monday 20th of March 2017 10:34:43 AM
The fossilized leg bones of a giant penguin that lived 61 million years ago have been discovered in New Zealand.Editor's note: This is not exactly a Linux or FOSS story, but who can resist an article about our mascot?

Phoronix: OpenGL 4.0 / FP64 Patches Updated For Intel Ivy Bridge

Monday 20th of March 2017 10:22:09 AM
Igalia's Samuel Iglesias Gonsálvez has updated his 28 patches for ARB_gpu_shader_fp64 support for Intel Ivy Bridge hardware that in turn allows these older Intel graphics to have OpenGL 4.0 support...

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux Kernel Podcast for 2017/03/21
  • Announcing the Shim review process [Ed: accepting rather than fighting very malicious things]
    However, a legitimate criticism has been that there's very little transparency in Microsoft's signing process. Some people have waited for significant periods of time before being receiving a response. A large part of this is simply that demand has been greater than expected, and Microsoft aren't in the best position to review code that they didn't write in the first place.
  • rtop – A Nifty Tool to Monitor Remote Server Over SSH
    rtop is a simple, agent-less, remote server monitoring tool that works over SSH. It doesn’t required any other software to be installed on remote machine, except openSSH server package & remote server credentials.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.3 and KDE Applications 16.12.3, More
    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux project, an open-source operating system originally based on Arch Linux and the KDE Plasma desktop environment, announced the availability of the latest KDE updates in the distro's repositories. Those of you using Chakra GNU/Linux as your daily drive will be happy to learn that the stable repos were filled with numerous up-to-date packages from the recently released KDE Plasma 5.9.3 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.3 software suite, and KDE Frameworks 5.32.0 collection of over 70 add-on libraries for Qt 5.
  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST development sprint 32
    One of the known limitations of the current installer is that it’s only able to automatically propose an encrypted schema if LVM is used. For historical reasons, if you want to encrypt your root and/or home partitions but not to use LVM, you would need to use the expert partitioner… and hope for the best from the bootloader proposal. But the new storage stack is here (well, almost here) to make all the old limitations vanish. With our testing ISO it’s already possible to set encryption with just one click for both partition-based and LVM-based proposals. The best possible partition schema is correctly created and everything is encrypted as the user would expect. We even have continuous tests in our internal openQA instance for it. The part of the installer managing the bootloader installation is still not adapted, which means the resulting system would need some manual fixing of Grub before being able to boot… but that’s something for an upcoming sprint (likely the very next one).
  • Debian stretch on the Raspberry Pi 3 (update) (2017-03-22)
    I previously wrote about my Debian stretch preview image for the Raspberry Pi 3.
  • Asus Tinker Board – Chromium YouTube Performance
    One of the many strengths of the Asus Tinker Board is its multimedia support. This 4K video capable machine is a mouthwatering prospect for the multimedia enthusiast. The machine has a respectable 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 quad-core processor. It’s only 32-bit (unlike the Raspberry Pi 3) but has a higher clock speed. The Tinker Board also sports an integrated ARM-based Mali T764 graphics processor (GPU).

Microsoft vs GNU/Linux

Netflix and GNU/Linux

today's howtos