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Updated: 1 hour 34 min ago

TuxMachines: Every Little Hacker needs a Little Linux Computer

Sunday 25th of September 2016 12:19:31 PM

I know what you’re probably all thinking, why isn’t this kid’s adorable face on every possible toddler related product currently on the market? Rest assured, I constantly remind my sister of how she could be exploiting his cuteness for millions of dollars- but I digress. Where were we? Oh right, Linux.

Let’s talk hardware. If we’re building this little dude a Linux computer and we’re “ballin’ on a budget”, there’s no better choice than a Raspberry Pi. I mean he is a hacker in training, right? His typing (and well, hand coordination in general) isn’t that great yet, so we’ll need an over-sized keyboard. A big mouse pad, and a good wireless mouse will do well. Oh, and how about a VESA mount case for the Raspberry Pi so it stays out of the way? All of that should do nicely.

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TuxMachines: Can Justin Trudeau Fix Canada’s Broken Government IT System?

Sunday 25th of September 2016 11:38:51 AM

During a March hearing before the House of Commons Government Operations Committee, there was a telling exchange between an official of Shared Services Canada (SSC)–the department that manages the Canadian federal government’s IT–and rookie MP David Graham. Graham wanted to know what percentage of SSC’s data centres and servers ran on Linux or other similar source software. Patrice Rondeau, the SSC official, replied that “approximately 15 percent are running Linux.”

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TuxMachines: Kaspersky Lab Announces Security solution for Tizen-based Internet of Things

Sunday 25th of September 2016 10:48:45 AM

Russia-based Kaspersky Lab has announced that it has developed security solutions for mobile devices and Internet of Things (IOT) running on the Tizen operating system.

IOT has emerged as one of the fastest growing areas of the IT market and based on projections from various research institutions and IT companies around the world, the Internet of Things (IOT) infrastructure will integrate around 200 billion devices worldwide comprising smartphones, computers, household appliances, automobiles and several electronic items.

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TuxMachines: My Mom Runs Linux!

Sunday 25th of September 2016 10:17:17 AM

People are coming to Linux in droves these days. They each have their own reasons. It could be a desire to get out from under the thumb of proprietary software’s limitations, privacy concerns or just plain old economics. Some of them find a whole new world of computing happiness and others walk away frustrated. Why is that?

How you approach learning something new usually will determine just how successful you are at learning it. It’s all about attitude. Learning is a journey and those who cling to the fear of not reaching a pleasant destination usually quit before they start and stay right where they are. Those who are born with an innate curiosity and a sense of adventure often find that learning something new brings great rewards. Thus, they are constantly looking for new things to learn. It’s the naturally curious ones who tend to do well with Linux.

If you sit a child in front of a Linux computer, they usually just start using it. It’s an amazing thing to watch. Kids are curious by nature and they also have the added advantage of not having any preconceived notions when it comes to how a computer ought to work. I have found, on the other hand, that the hardest kind of person to teach Linux is the crusty old Windows power user. They are lost from the start and tend to get easily frustrated when they come across something they don’t understand. Their outbursts of anger can be quite animated! The Internet’s public forums are full of vitriol flung at the Linux Community by these sorts of folks. I learned a long time ago that the best way to deal with them is to simply ignore them. The psychological reasons for their bitter negativity are beyond my expertise to deal with, therefore, I don’t. What I try to do is focus on the positive and help folks who want to learn.

Also: Windows 10 Might Soon Track Absolutely Everything You Do for Your Own Good

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Reddit: Ubuntu and Unity

Sunday 25th of September 2016 09:35:08 AM

When will Ubuntu release with a properly made Unity 8?

submitted by /u/Rytuklis
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: FreeBSD 11.0 Final Release ISO Images Available For Download

Sunday 25th of September 2016 09:33:07 AM

The Final Release of FreeBSD 11.0 is scheduled for Wednesday, September 28, 2016. However, the release builds have started to appear on FreeBSD’s FTP mirrors and you can download the final ISO right now.

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TuxMachines: Android Leftovers

Sunday 25th of September 2016 09:21:40 AM

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Reddit: My Mom Runs Linux! - Freedom Penguin

Sunday 25th of September 2016 09:20:50 AM

TuxMachines: A short critique of Stallmanism

Sunday 25th of September 2016 08:39:47 AM

I like Stallman and tend to agree with him often: regarding software, or other politics. This article tries to constructively criticize some parts of the free software movement's ideology, which I collectively refer to as "Stallmanism" (only as pun). It is not an attempt at a personal attack on Stallman, and by reading further you will probably see my politics are very far from that: I coined the term Stallmanism simply because he is at the center of the movement and himself a primary source of the ideas I am critiquing.

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LXer: Ghost Minitaur Robot Opens Doors & Climbs Fences & Stairs!

Sunday 25th of September 2016 08:34:37 AM
Give this little droid a compatible brain, like a Raspberry Pi 3, which can display images via a built-in HDMI port and runs Linux at 1.2 Gigahertz, and is more akin to an actual computer than a microcontroller, and let programming of a robotic brain function shatter the ceiling on possibilities.

LXer: Krebs on Security booted off Akamai network after DDoS attack proves pricey

Sunday 25th of September 2016 06:28:49 AM
Security blog Krebs on Security has been taken offline by host Akamai Technologies following a DDoS attack which reached 665 Gbps in size.

Reddit: State of global/local integration menu's other than Unity

Sunday 25th of September 2016 05:19:09 AM

I have been using Unity for well over 6-7 years, and one of the main reasons is that I love local/global menus. I really value vertical screen real estate and have found that it can recover quite a bit of space. I am itching to try other DE's however so I'm wondering if there are any others that have an experience just like Unity.

submitted by /u/cadiolis
[link] [comments]

LXer: Tails 2.6 - Ultra-secure Linux OS Used By Snowden Gets Updated Tor And Kernel

Sunday 25th of September 2016 04:23:01 AM
The development team of Tails, the anonymity-focused Debian GNU/Linux-based Live CD operating system, is here with its latest release. Tails 2.6 fixes multiple bugs and improves the software packages. This release is based on Linux kernel 4.6 and Tor 0.2.8.7. While the existing Tails users can go for the update, new users need to download the Live CD from Tails website.

Reddit: Why does steam do this(wine)?

Sunday 25th of September 2016 02:40:12 AM

here is a pic.

why does this happen?

i have kinda weird setup,

i have a 20gb ssd partition with this layout

and i used wine to install steam to my 20gb partition and then it gives an error and doesnt display text.

submitted by /u/BaconClaw
[link] [comments]

LXer: How to enable automatic updates on a Linux VPS

Sunday 25th of September 2016 02:17:13 AM
In order to keep the data stored on your server as secure as possible, it is recommended to upgrade the services regularly. Keeping your services up to date is a very easy task and requires a small amount of time, but it is crucial for the safety of your data.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Twitter App ‘Corebird’ Now Supports Longer Tweets
    An updated version of the open-source desktop Twitter client Corebird is available for download. Corebird 1.3.2 is the second bug-fix release since the release of Corebird 1.3 back in July. It enables support for the social media service’s newer, longer tweets. Twitter says the new so-called “expanded tweets” do not count media attachments (photos, GIFs, videos, and polls) towards the 140-character limit. It also says it plans to exclude usernames in replies from the character count too, though an exact date for this has yet to be announced.
  • GTK Radio Player ‘Gradio’ Gets New Beta Release, Gains New Features
    A new beta release of the desktop radio player app GRadio is available for download — and it’s broadcasting a wealth of changes. Developer Häcker Felix says the next major stable release needs to deliver ‘a rock-solid stable base for the next versions’, and to do so he needs feedback on how the app is shaping up right now.
  • Kdenlive news and packaging
    Following our last week’s monthly Café, we decided to concentrate on advanced trimming features and if possible an audio mixer for the next Kdenlive 16.12 release. It was also mentionned that several users requested the comeback of the rotoscoping effect, which was lost in the KF5 port, preventing some users to upgrade their Kdenlive version.

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.