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Updated: 1 hour 59 min ago

Reddit: Is your own hosted file server on AWS/Digital Ocean instance any more safe than Google Drive or Dropbox?

11 hours 54 min ago

In this quite popular article of his, Bryan Lunduke talks about how the popular online digital storage services like Shmop Shmox (aka Drop Box) are like fast food or junk food: Its pretty easy to sign up, but there are long term issues with the provider getting hacked or your privacy getting violated in their bid to make more money.

But how is the way that he suggests (self-hosted file server) any more secure? Most people don't have the nerdy capacity to maintain their in-house data centers, so again they are obviously going to the cloud providers like Amazon AWS or Digital Ocean to create their own Ubuntu instances.

So the real question is, are IAAS (Infrastructure As A Service) providers any better than SAAS (Software As A Service) providers from security and privacy perspective? Or in Bryan Lunduke's words, is home made food really that healthy than pizzas and burgers when most of the raw materials use similarly baked ingredients?

submitted by /u/baba_ranchoddas
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LinuxToday: Busting the myth that net neutrality hampers investment

11 hours 57 min ago

At Mozilla we believe the current rules provide vital protections to ensure that ISPs don’t act as gatekeepers for online content and services.

Linux.com: uniprof: Transparent Unikernel for Performance Profiling and Debugging

12 hours 57 min ago
Title: uniprof: Transparent Unikernel for Performance Profiling and Debugging20 SepLearn more

TuxMachines: The Red Hat Way

13 hours 31 min ago
  • Red Hat wants to make cold-shouldered OpenStack red hot

    At OpenStack Summit in Boston last May, some speculated that the event might be the last gasp for OpenStack — an open-source platform for cloud computing and infrastructure-as-service. Granted, OpenStack was one of the less hyped open-source projects of the past year. But renewed community and end-user interest is breathing fresh life into the platform, according to Rob Young (pictured), senior manager of virtualization product and strategy at Red Hat Inc.

    Telcos and others are adopting OpenStack “because of the simplification of what was once complex, but also in the cost savings that can be realized by managing your own cloud within a hybrid cloud environment,” Young said.

  • Improved multimedia support with Pipewire in Fedora 27

    Pipewire — a new project of underlying Linux infrastructure to handle multimedia better — has just been officially launched. The project’s main goal is to improve the handling of both audio and video. Additionally, Pipewire introduces a security model to allow easy interaction with multimedia devices from containerized and sandboxed applications, i.e. Flatpak apps.

  • Architecting the future with abstractions and metadata

    The modern data center is built on abstractions, with Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift leading the way.

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TuxMachines: Games: Racing Games, Steam, SteamWorld Dig 2, XCOM 2: War of the Chosen

13 hours 32 min ago

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Phoronix: Chrome 62 Beta Released With OpenType Font Variations, DOM Media Capture

13 hours 47 min ago
Google has rolled out their public beta of the upcoming Chrome/Chromium 62 web-browser update...

TuxMachines: Software: DNS Checkers, Alternatives to Adobe Software, Fake Hollywood Hacker Terminal and More

13 hours 48 min ago

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TuxMachines: KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

14 hours 2 min ago
  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website

    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.

  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps

    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.

  • Kube in Randa

    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains.
    It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).

  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes

    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13.

    When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use.

    To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless.

    [...]

    In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.

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TuxMachines: FSF, GNU and FSFE

14 hours 4 min ago
  • LibrePlanet 2018: Let's talk about Freedom. Embedded.

    The call for sessions is open now, until November 2nd, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. Pre-order a LibrePlanet 10th anniversary t-shirt when you register to attend!

    Do you want to discuss or teach others about a topic relevant to the free software community? You've got until Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 at 10:00 EDT (14:00 UTC) to submit your session proposals.

    LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and everyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.

  • LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, CFP and registration open now

    The call for proposals is open now, until November 2, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open.

    LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and anyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.

  • dot-zed extractor
  • FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

    To push our demand, the FSFE launched a new campaign last week: "Public Money Public Code". The campaign explains the benefits of releasing publicly funded Software under free licences with a short inspiring video and an open letter to sign. Furthermore, the campaign and the open letter will be used in the coming months until the European Parliament election in 2019 to highlight good and bad examples of publicly funded software development and its potential reuse.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe Leads Call For Taxpayer-Funded Software To Be Licensed For Free Re-use

    Considered objectively, it's hard to think of any good reasons why code that is paid for by the public should not be released publicly as a matter of course. The good news is that this "public money, public code" argument is precisely the approach that open access advocates have used with considerable success in the field of academic publishing, so there's hope it might gain some traction in the world of software too.

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TuxMachines: Security: WordPress 4.8.2, CCleaner 5.33, Apache Patch and Cryptocurrencies

14 hours 36 min ago
  • WordPress 4.8.2 Security and Maintenance Release

    WordPress 4.8.2 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

  • Attack on CCleaner Highlights the Importance of Securing Downloads and Maintaining User Trust

    Some of the most worrying kinds of attacks are ones that exploit users’ trust in the systems and softwares they use every day. Yesterday, Cisco’s Talos security team uncovered just that kind of attack in the computer cleanup software CCleaner. Download servers at Avast, the company that owns CCleaner, had been compromised to distribute malware inside CCleaner 5.33 updates for at least a month. Avast estimates that over 2 million users downloaded the affected update. Even worse, CCleaner’s popularity with journalists and human rights activists means that particularly vulnerable users are almost certainly among that number. Avast has advised CCleaner Windows users to update their software immediately.

    This is often called a “supply chain” attack, referring to all the steps software takes to get from its developers to its users. As more and more users get better at bread-and-butter personal security like enabling two-factor authentication and detecting phishing, malicious hackers are forced to stop targeting users and move “up” the supply chain to the companies and developers that make software. This means that developers need to get in the practice of “distrusting” their own infrastructure to ensure safer software releases with reproducible builds, allowing third parties to double-check whether released binary and source packages correspond. The goal should be to secure internal development and release infrastructure to that point that no hijacking, even from a malicious actor inside the company, can slip through unnoticed.

  • Apache bug leaks contents of server memory for all to see—Patch now

    There's a bug in the widely used Apache Web Server that causes servers to leak pieces of arbitrary memory in a way that could expose passwords or other secrets, a freelance journalist has disclosed.

    The vulnerability can be triggered by querying a server with what's known as an OPTIONS request. Like the better-known GET and POST requests, OPTIONS is a type of HTTP method that allows users to determine which HTTP requests are supported by the server. Normally, a server will respond with GET, POST, OPTIONS, and any other supported methods. Under certain conditions, however, responses from Apache Web Server include the data stored in computer memory. Patches are available here and here.

  • The Pirate Bay Takes Heat for Testing Monero Mining

    Cryptocurrencies usually are mined with CPU power initially, she told LinuxInsider. Users then find ways to speed up the hashing before going to GPU. They build specialized hardware and field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips to carry out the hashing function in order to mine much faster.

    [...]

    The notion that The Pirate Bay effectively would borrow resources from its own users is not the problem, suggested Jessica Groopman, principal analyst at Tractica.

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TuxMachines: Ubuntu and Linux Mint Development

14 hours 39 min ago
  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 19 Sep 2017
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter 519

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #519 for the weeks of September 5 – 18, 2017, and the full version is available here.

  • Ubuntu Desktop default application survey results

    Canonical has released the results of its default applications survey for the 18.04 long-term support release of Ubuntu.

    The results of the previous survey – for Ubuntu 17.10, dubbed Artful Aardvark – yielded great suggestions, many of which have made their way into the beta version of the operating system.

    For Ubuntu 18.04, over 15,000 responses were processed by the Ubuntu Desktop team.

    “The team is now hard at work evaluating many of the suggested applications,” said Canonical.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” Information Released

    Linux Mint Project Leader Clement Lefebvre, otherwise known as “Clem” released a blog post on Sept. 18, giving some information about the upcoming release of Linux Mint 18.3, dubbed “Sylvia.”

    In his blog post Lefebvre gave some ideas to some of the pieces of software and changes that will be coming, such as the inclusion of the popular system restoration tool Timeshift.

    For those of you who haven’t used Timeshift, it’s an application that creates snapshots of your system, and then restores them later, similar to Windows System Restore, or Mac OS’s Time Machine.

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LXer: How to Install PHP 7.1 on Debian 8

15 hours 24 min ago
I recently wrote a similar article for Ubuntu, but here is how to install on PHP 7.1 on Debian 8.

Phoronix: How AMD EPYC & Intel Xeon Gold Compare To Various Amazon EC2 Cloud Instances

15 hours 57 min ago
Last week we began with our EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarking of this high-end AMD server CPU featuring 32 cores / 64 threads per socket. Earlier this week were also some 10-year old Opteron vs. EPYC benchmarks and power efficiency tests while the latest in our EPYC Linux testing is seeing how the new AMD processor compares to various Amazon EC2 cloud instances.

TuxMachines: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 13

16 hours 9 min ago

Now that GNOME 3.26 is released, available in Ubuntu artful, and final GNOME Shell UI is confirmed, it’s time to adapt our default user experience to it. Let’s discuss how we worked with dash to dock upstream on the transparency feature. For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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LXer: Linux Foundation LFCE Georgi Yadkov Shares His Certification Journey

16 hours 39 min ago
The Linux Foundation is highlighting some of those who have recently passed the certification examinations. In this article, recently certified engineer Georgi Yadkov shares his experience.

TuxMachines: Linux-driven Sitara SiP module shrinks to 21mm square

17 hours 37 min ago

Octavo’s OSD335x-SM is a 40 percent smaller version of its AM335x-based OSD335x SiP that adds a 4KB EEPROM. There’s also a compact, open-spec dev board.

Last year, Octavo Systems added a new twist to BeagleBone development when it released its 27 x 27mm OSD335x System-In-Package (SiP) module. The OSD335x, which went on to form the basis of the BeagleBone Black Wireless and BeagleBone Blue SBCs, packs a Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x SoC and nearly all the functions of a BeagleBone Black SBC into a BGA module. Octavo has now followed up with a 40 percent smaller OSD335x-SM variant that measures 21 x 21mm (441 sq. mm).

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More in Tux Machines

5 fundamental differences between Windows 10 and Linux

This comparison really only scratches the surface. And don't get me wrong, there are areas where Windows 10 bests Linux (few, but they do exist). In the end, however, the choice is yours. Chances are you'll be making the choice based on which platform will allow you get more work done and do so with a certain level of efficiency and reliability. I would highly recommend, to anyone, if Linux can enable you to get your work done...give it a go and see if you don't find it more dependable and predictable. Read more

Firefly COM dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. Read more

Games: Morphite, Mooseman, Arma, and PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller

  • Stylish FPS 'Morphite' released without Linux support, but it's coming
    Sadly, Morphite [Steam] has seen a delay with the Linux version. Thankfully, the developer was quick to respond and it's still coming.
  • The Mooseman, a short side-scrolling adventure just released for Linux
    In the mood for something a little out there? Well, The Mooseman [Steam] a short side-scroller might just hit the spot.
  • Arma 3 1.76 for Linux is planned, work on it to start "soon"
    Bohemia Interactive have announced in their latest "SITREP" that the Linux version of Arma 3 will be updated to the latest version of 1.76, work is set to start on it "soon".
  • Sony's PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller Now Supported in Fedora Linux, GNOME
    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. The patches submitted by the developer to the Bluetooth packages in the latest Fedora Linux release promise to bring improvements to the way PlayStation 3 DualShock controllers are set up in the environment if you're using the GNOME desktop environment. Until now, to set up a DualShock 3 controller, users had to plug it in via USB, then disconnect it, and then press the "P" button on the joypad, which would have popped-up a dialog to confirm the Bluetooth connection. But this method had some quirks though.

Debian Development Reports

  • Free software log (July and August 2017)
    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years. After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125
    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.