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Updated: 22 min 35 sec ago

TuxMachines: 3 little things in Linux 4.10 that will make a big difference

Friday 24th of February 2017 09:53:23 PM

Linux never sleeps. Linus Torvalds is already hard at work pulling together changes for the next version of the kernel (4.11). But with Linux 4.10 now out, three groups of changes are worth paying close attention to because they improve performance and enable feature sets that weren’t possible before on Linux.

Here’s a rundown of those changes to 4.10 and what they likely will mean for you, your cloud providers, and your Linux applications.

read more

TuxMachines: SODIMM-style module runs Linux on VIA’s 1GHz Cortex-A9 SoC

Friday 24th of February 2017 09:50:17 PM

VIA unveiled an SODIMM-style COM based on its Cortex-A9 WM8850 SoC, with 512MB RAM and 8GB eMMC, plus Ethernet, CSI, graphics, USB, and serial ports.

The 68.6 x 43mm “SOM-6X50” computer-on-module appears to be VIA’s second-ever ARM COM. Back in Sept. 2015, the company released a 70 x 70mm Qseven form factor QSM-8Q60 COM, based on a 1GHz NXP DualLite SoC.

read more

Reddit: Using GnuPG and Vim to store passwords?

Friday 24th of February 2017 09:26:56 PM

What are the risks of storing passwords in a file encrypted using GPG and edited using a Vim GPG plugin?

submitted by /u/LemonDriftPie
[link] [comments]

LXer: Engineer Finds Passion and Community With Kids On Computers

Friday 24th of February 2017 09:00:51 PM
If you love technology, you can find a space for yourself and connect with others around mutual interests, according to Avni Khatri, president of Kids on Computers (KoC), a nonprofit that sets up computer labs using donated hardware and open source software in areas where kids have no other access to technology.  

LinuxToday: Recent open source hardware trends, from SBCs to servers

Friday 24th of February 2017 09:00:00 PM

At ELC Europe, Intel MinnowBoard SBC evangelist John Hawley surveyed open hardware trends, and their impact on OS-enabled device and system development.

Phoronix: RADV Vulkan Performance Appears To Improve With Linux 4.11

Friday 24th of February 2017 08:24:17 PM
A few days ago I posted some results of surprise performance improvements for a Radeon RX 470 when testing the DRM-Next code queued for Linux 4.11. I've now tested that kernel on more systems and can confirm at least benefits more widespread for RADV's Vulkan performance.

LXer: Which is the best programming language for beginners?

Friday 24th of February 2017 07:52:13 PM
What is the best language for a budding programmer to get their start with? There are probably as many opinions about which language is best for beginners as there are languages to choose from. And the options change all of the time. When we asked this question two years ago, Python came out on top as the clear winner. But is it still the best choice today?read more

Reddit: Using badblocks on a LUN from a storage array: read-write test unneccessary?

Friday 24th of February 2017 07:14:26 PM

We had an incident on our storage array recently, that caused random (but not fatal) corruption in a number of LUNs used by our Oracle databases. Some database files were in a state where the database could access them, but any filesystem or app operations that attempted to read a certain block on the file, would result in I/O errors. Our current action plan has been to take each DB down, and run a badblocks scan on the affected filesystems. In our first case, we ran fsck with badblocks enabled, performing a full read-write test (fsck -cc -v /path/to/screwed/volume).

The scan found and repaired a number of blocks, which made the affected files readable again at the filesystem level- but the test took 18 hours to complete, which freaked out management. Some of our other affected database LUNs are much larger, and they don't like the idea of multi-day business impact while we perform filesystem scans.

When discussing the incident with our storage vendor, their SME mentioned that we shouldn't have to perform a full read-write test on the LUN's (logical) blocks, and that a read-only test would be good enough. To paraphrase, he said: "If you can't write to the (logical) block on your filesystem, you wouldn't be able to read from it either... so there is no point spending the time to test for writes against our LUN."

This just doesn't sound right to me. It seemed like he was suggesting that a write test on the logical blocks would be redundant, if the underlying physical blocks are writable according to the storage array. I was interested if anyone else had experiences / opinions on this? Some of our database LUNs are very large, and I don't want to run a check that requires multiple days of downtime if it isn't necessary. In those cases, I would likely do something different, like creating another LUN + filesystem, and using dd to export the files into a new, clean filesystem.

submitted by /u/feistypenguin
[link] [comments]

LinuxToday: What to do when people start hacking your culture

Friday 24th of February 2017 07:00:00 PM

When organizational rules exist, people will try to game them.

LXer: Open Source Hardware: From SBCs to Servers

Friday 24th of February 2017 06:43:36 PM
When you mention open source hardware, people typically think about community-backed hacker boards. However, the open hardware movement is growing on many fronts, including medical devices, rocketry and satellites, 3D printers, cameras, VR gear, and even laptops and servers.

LinuxToday: How To Instantly Share Files And Folders In Arch Linux

Friday 24th of February 2017 06:00:00 PM

Quickserve is a simple http server that allows you to share files quickly between Arch Linux systems and/or other operating systems.

Reddit: User Name Changed in Terminal Without Permission

Friday 24th of February 2017 05:38:59 PM

So here is a weird thing. I'm running Fedora 24 with kernel 4.79.200fc24x86_64. This morning I launched terminal to see steve@renees-iphone instead of steve@home the same thing has changed when I log in as root.

My problem is I have no idea what renees-iphone is, how it got there and what would have installed it. Other than deleting some cache a few days ago I have not logged in as root, and I have not made any changes to the system or installed any software in weeks. Other than switching to Xfinity wifi yesterday, nothing has changed with my computer, and even then I simply connected to a different network.

Any help would be greatly appreciated

submitted by /u/vertdeferk
[link] [comments]

Phoronix: Fresh RadeonSI Mesa Git Gaming Benchmarks On 7 Linux Desktops

Friday 24th of February 2017 05:35:00 PM
When posting last week our Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Radeon benchmarks and Windows vs. Linux NVIDIA Pascal benchmarks and then the Windows vs. Linux relative performance analysis, as usual, it didn't take long for some to argue that the Linux gaming performance is actually faster but "Unity 7 is slower" and the similar FUD that is usually waged whenever looking at cross-platform performance.

LXer: Top 3 machine learning libraries for Python

Friday 24th of February 2017 05:34:59 PM
You don't have to be a data scientist to be fascinated by the world of machine learning, but a few travel guides might help you navigate the vast universe that also includes big data, artificial intelligence, and deep learning, along with a large dose of statistics and analytics.read more

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Friday 24th of February 2017 05:22:10 PM
  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya

    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.

  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]

    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.

  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download

    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download

    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.

read more

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Diving into Drupal: Princeton’s Multi-site Migration Success with Open-source
    Princeton University’s web team had a complex and overwhelming digital ecosystem comprised of many different websites, created from pre-built templates and hosted exclusively on internal servers. Fast forward six years: Princeton continues to manage a their multisite and flagship endeavors on the open-source Drupal platform, and have seen some great results since their migration back in 2011. However, this success did not come overnight. Organizational buy-in, multi-site migration and authentication were a few of the many challenges Princeton ran into when making the decision to move to the cloud.
  • GitHub Invites Developers to Contribute to the Open Source Guides
    GitHub has recently launched its Open Source Guides, a collection of resources addressing the most common scenarios and best practices for both contributors and maintainers of open source projects. The guides themselves are open source and GitHub is actively inviting developers to participate and share their stories.
  • Top open source projects
    TechRadar recently posted an article about "The best open source software 2017" where they list a few of their favorite open source software projects. It's really hard for an open source software project to become popular if it has poor usability—so I thought I'd add a few quick comments of my own about each.
  • Dropbox releases open-source Slack bot
    Dropbox is looking to tackle unauthorized access and other security incidents in the workplace with a chatbot. Called Securitybot, it that can automatically grab alerts from security monitoring tools and verify incidents with other employers. The company says that through the use of the chatbot, which is open source, it will no longer be necessary to manually reach out to employees to verify access, every time someone enters a sensitive part of the system. The bot is built primarily for Slack, but it is designed to be transferable to other platforms as well.
  • Dropbox’s tool shows how chatbots could be future of cybersecurity
    Disillusion with chatbots has set in across the tech industry and yet Dropbox’s deep thinkers believe they have spotted the technology’s hidden talent: cybersecurity.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • Entroware have unleashed the 'Aether' laptop for Linux enthusiasts featuring Intel's 7th generation CPUs
  • New Entroware Aether Laptop Pairs Intel Kaby Lake with Ubuntu
    The new Entroware Aether is the latest Linux powered laptop from British company Entroware, and is powered by the latest Intel Kaby Lake processors.
  • Freedom From Microsoft v1.01
    But we can be Free from Microsoft! As we saw above, there is a powerful – and now popular movement afoot to make alternative software available. The Free Software Foundation, and the GNU Project, both founded by Richard Stallman, provide Free software to users with licenses that guarantee users rights: the rights to view, modify, and distribute the software source code. With GNU-licensed software, such as Linux, the user is in complete control over the software they employ. And as people contribute to modify Free Software source code, and are required to share those modifications again, the aggregate creative acts give rise to the availability of many more, much more useful results. Value is created beyond what anyone thought possible, and our freedom multiplies.
  • Review of the week 2017/08
    This week we had to cancel a couple snapshots, as a regression in grub was detected, that caused issues on chain-loading bootloaders. But thanks to our genius maintainers, the issue could be found, fixed and integrated into Tumbleweed (and this despite being busy with hackweek! A great THANK YOU!). Despite those canceled snapshots, this review will still span 4 revisions: 0216, 0218, 0219 and 0224. And believe me, there have been quite some things coming your way.

Security Leftovers

  • [Older] The Secure Linux OS - Tails
    Some people worry a lot about security issues. Anyone can worry about their personal information, such as credit card numbers, on the Internet. They can also be concerned with someone monitoring their activity on the Internet, such as the websites they visit. To help ease these frustrations about the Internet anyone can use the Internet without having to “look over their shoulder”.
  • Password management made easy as news of CloudFlare leak surfaces
    In the last 24 hours, news broke that a serious Cloudflare bug has been causing sensitive data leaks since September, exposing 5.5 million users across thousands of websites. In addition to login data cached by Google and other search engines, it is possible that some iOS applications have been affected as well. With the scale of this leak, the best course of action is to update every password for every site you have an account for. If there was ever a good time to modernize your password practices, this is it. As consumers and denizens of the Internet, we have a responsibility to be aware of the risks we face and make an attempt to mitigate that risk by taking best-effort precautions. Poor password and authentication hygiene leaves a user open to risks such as credit card fraud and identity theft, just like forgetting to brush your teeth regularly can lead to cavities and gum disease. This leaves us with the question of what good password and authentication hygiene looks like. If we stick with the (admittedly poorly chosen) dentistry analogy, then there are five easily identifiable aspects of good hygiene.
  • Security: You might want to change passwords on sites that use Cloudflare
  • Smoothwall Express
    The award-winning Smoothwall Express open-source firewall—designed specifically to be installed and administered by non-experts—continues its forward development march with a new 3.1 release.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Derivatives

  • 'Big Bang Theory's' Stuart wears Ubuntu T-shirt
    Am I the only person to notice that comic book shop-owning Stuart (Kevin Sussman) on the "The Big Bang Theory" is wearing an Ubuntu T-shirt on the episode airing Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017? (It's Season 10, Episode 17, if that information helps you.) The T-shirt appearance isn't as overt as Sheldon's mention of the Ubuntu Linux operating system way back in Season 3 (Episode 22, according to one YouTube video title), but it's an unusual return for Ubuntu to the world of "Big Bang."
  • Unity Explained: A Look at Ubuntu’s Default Desktop Environment
    Ubuntu is the most well-known version of Linux around. It’s how millions of people have discovered Linux for the first time, and continues to draw new users into the world of open source operating systems. So the interface Ubuntu uses is one many people are going to see. In this area, Ubuntu is unique. Even as a new user, rarely will you confuse the default Ubuntu desktop for something else. That’s because Ubuntu has its own interface that you can — but probably won’t — find anywhere else. It’s called Unity.
  • A Look at Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS for Raspberry Pi
    Installing Ubuntu MATE onto my Raspberry Pi 3 was straight forward. You can easily use Etcher to write the image to a microSD card, the partition is automatically resized to fill your microSD card when the pi is powered up for the first time, and then you are sent through a typical guided installer. Installation takes several minutes and finally the system reboots and you arrive at the desktop. A Welcome app provides some good information on Ubuntu MATE, including a section specific for the Raspberry Pi. The Welcome app explains that the while the system is based on Ubuntu MATE and uses Ubuntu armhf base, it is in fact using the same kernel as Raspian. It also turns out that a whole set of Raspian software has been ported over such as raspi-config, rpi.gpio, sonic-pi, python-sent-hat, omxplayer, etc. I got in a very simple couple of tests that showed that GPIO control worked.
  • Zorin OS 12 Business Has Arrived [Ed: Zorin 12.1 has also just been released]
    This new release of Zorin OS Business takes advantage of the new features and enhancements in Zorin OS 12, our biggest release ever. These include an all new desktop environment, a new way to install software, entirely new desktop apps and much more. You can find more information about what’s new in Zorin OS 12 here.