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Updated: 16 min 34 sec ago

TuxMachines: Leftovers: Software

Sunday 15th of January 2017 12:52:50 PM
  • 'TimeKpr' A Parental Control Application for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Parental Control application for Linux is bit hard to find, if you encounter any then it may be outdated or just don't work as per your wish, they just restrict internet access or sort of stuff. If someone uses your computer or you let your kids use your computer. You can restrict access for them as you want, from now you don't have to say your kids to leave computer, Timekpr will do it better. You can call Timekpr restriction application or parental control application, whatever you like to call it.

  • VidCutter: A Quick And Easy Way To Trim And Merge Videos in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    VidCutter is a free video trimming application, it is written in Python3 and PyQt5 Gui framework and it's cross-platform available for Linux and Windows, based on Qt5 and uses FFmpeg on the backend to perform quick and easy video trimming/splitting/clipping and merging/joining. VidCutter is a small program does exactly what is says, with no frills or extras. It supports most of the common video formats such as: AVI, MP4, MPEG 1/2, WMV, MP3, MOV, 3GP, FLV and so on, it exports in the same format as source file. Simply open a video file, wait for it to load and then choose the part of the video you want using the start and stop markers. The only downside currently there is no export settings available and other formats.

  • A List of Privacy Measures

    This aims to document everything I use to maintain a degree of privacy in my digital life, along with a few comments. It is targeted at intermediate Linux users who can get everything setup without any hand holding. I had wanted to write tutorials on what follows, but that would make the post unbearably long. Instead, I shall try to link to pages that are good starting points.

  • Variety 0.6.3 Rich Features Wallpaper Manager Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Variety 0.6.3 Rich Features Wallpaper Manager Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint There are many wallpaper manager applications available which offers many features but Variety has its own way to get things done. It can display wallpapers from local sources or lots of various online sources, allows user to change wallpaper on a regular interval, and provides easy ways to separate the great images from the junk.

  • uGet 2.0.8 Download Manager Released For Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA

    uGet (formerly called urlgfe) is a download manager. uGet is a very Powerful & Lightweight download manager application with a large inventory of features. uGet is an Open Source download manager application for GNU/Linux developed with GTK+. It allows you to classify download, and allows you to import download from HTML files. Every category has an independent configuration that can be inherited by each download in that category. uGet uses very few resources while at the same time packs an unparalleled powerful feature set. These features include a Queue, Pause/Resume, Multi-Connection (with adaptive segment management), Mirrors (multi-source), Multi-Protocol, Advanced Categorization, Clipboard Monitor, Batch Downloads, Individualized Category Default Settings, Speed Limiting, Total Active Downloads Control, and so much more!

  • Telegram Desktop reaches version 1.0 – and it's BEAUTIFUL

    Telegram was available for desktops and laptops since 2013. Today it finally graduates to version 1.0 with a fabulous new design.

    Consistent material design, great animations, and support for custom themes make Telegram for Windows, Mac, and Linux the tool for messaging from your Mac or PC.

  • A look at darktable 2.2.0

    In what is becoming its annual tradition, the darktable project released a new stable version of its image-editing system at the end of December. The new 2.2 release incorporates several new photo-correction features of note, including automatic repair of distorted perspectives and the ability to reconstruct highlights that are washed out in some color channels but not all—a type of overexposure that other editors can miss. There is a new image-warping tool that lets users edit image pixels (a first for darktable, which has historically focused on image-wide tasks like color correction). And there is at least one new tool that may prove intriguing even to users who prefer editing images in some other program: a utility for inspecting and editing color-mapping look-up tables.

    Source code bundles are available for download through the project's GitHub repository and binary packages are already available for a wide variety of popular Linux distributions. Users of the 2.0 series should note, however, that opening existing darktable edit files with the 2.2 release will automatically migrate them to the newer format and render them subsequently unopenable with darktable 2.0.

  • Moving on from net-tools

    Old habits die hard, even when support for the tools required by those habits ended over a decade ago. It is not surprising for users to cling to the tools they learned early in their careers, even when they are told that it is time to move on. A recent discussion on the Debian development list showed the sort of stress that this kind of inertia can put on a distribution and explored the options that distributors have to try to nudge their users toward more supportable solutions.

    The package in question is net-tools, the home for many familiar network-configuration utilities. If you are accustomed to using commands like ifconfig, arp, netstat, or route to make network changes, you are a net-tools user. Many of these tools have a long pedigree, at least in spirit, having originally been written before the first Linux kernel. Anybody who has been administering Unix-like systems for any period of time will certainly have learned how to use the net-tools utilities to get things done.

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TuxMachines: KDE Leftovers

Sunday 15th of January 2017 12:52:03 PM
  • Google Code-in draws to a close -- students finish your final task by January 16, 2017 at 09:00 (PST)

    Mentors, you have until January 18, 2017 at 09:00 (PST) to evaluate your student's work. Please get that done before the deadline, so that admins don't have to judge the student work.

  • Mycroft Plasmoid for KDE Plasma 5
  • Plasma 5.9 Beta Kicks off 2017 in Style.

    Thursday, 12 January 2017. Today KDE releases the beta of this year’s first Plasma feature update, Plasma 5.9. While this release brings many exciting new features to your desktop, we'll continue to provide bugfixes to Plasma 5.8 LTS.

  • The hype is great: WikiToLearn India Conf2017 is almost here!

    In less than two weeks WikiToLearn India Conf2017 is about to happen. We are extremely happy because this is the first big international event entirely dedicated to WikiToLearn. We have to thank the members of our community who are working hard to provide you this amazing event. For sure, the best thing about this conference is the great variety of speakers: Ruphy is flying from Italy to India to attend the conference and give a talk about WTL. For this event we have speakers lined up from Mediawiki, KDE and Mozilla Community. Several projects and ideas will meet at WTL India Conf2017 and this is simply amazing for us! The entire event will be recorded and videos will be uploaded online: you won’t miss any talk!

  • Fixing old stuff

    On FreeBSD, Qt4 is still a thing — for instance, for the KDE4 desktop that is still the latest full-KDE experience you can get from the official packages. And although that software is pretty old, the base system still evolves. FreeBSD 9 has been put to rest, and with it all the GCC-based FreeBSD systems. That frees us from having to deal with GCC and Clang at the same time, and we can generally patch things in just one way (usually towards more-modern C++). But the base system also evolves “out from under” older software. There’s an effort to update the base system compiler (for FreeBSD 12) to Clang 4.0 (sometime soon-ish), and that means that our older C++ code is being exposed to a newer, pickier, compiler.

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TuxMachines: today's howtos

Sunday 15th of January 2017 12:51:20 PM

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Phoronix: Nearly 26,000 kWh Was Used On Linux Benchmarking In 2016

Sunday 15th of January 2017 12:47:58 PM
For those curious how much power is consumed with our constant flow of benchmarks and working 365 days per year, 2016 rang in at 25,943 kWh...

Phoronix: Debian Installer Stretch RC 1 Arrives, The /usr Merge Has Been Postponed

Sunday 15th of January 2017 12:20:48 PM
The Debian Installer is getting ready for the 9.0 "Stretch" release...

TuxMachines: Mintbox Mini Pro computer with Linux Mint now available for $395

Sunday 15th of January 2017 12:20:47 PM

The Mintbox Mini Pro is a tiny desktop computer with a fanless design for silent operation, a low-power AMD processor, 8GB of RAM, 120GB of solid state storage, and Linux Mint 18 software pre-installed.

It measures about 4.3″ x 3.3″ x 0,9″ and has a metal case made from zinc and aluminum.

First introduced in September, the MintBox Mini Pro is now available for purchase for $395.

Also: Librem 13 coreboot report – January 12, 2017

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TuxMachines: Why I switched from OS X to GNU/Linux

Sunday 15th of January 2017 11:38:05 AM

After I was done with my studies at the university I wanted to work for some company which worked with Open Source, I started at Pelagicore, where I still work. There we are creating custom Linux distributions for car manufacturers, we do UI work, we write Linux drivers, Linux middleware and so on. Because we work with Linux it is much more convinient to run Linux nativelly for developement too. At Pelagicore (almosc) all developers work on Linux desktops and laptops, I felt that I fit right in with my ThinkPad. And this was also why I used my iMac less and less, everybody around me was using Linux, it became cumbersome to do the overhead to get stuff running on the iMac which I already had running at work and on my laptop on Linux.

I started with Ubuntu, but quite fast switched to Debian testing with Gnome 3 because I learned about how Canonical treats everyone, their users (the [Amazon problem (http://www.zdnet.com/article/shuttleworth-defends-ubuntu-linux-integrating-amazon/) with Unity Dash search results, problems with their Intellectual Property Policy, etc.) It also helped that there was Jeremiah, who evangalizes debian day in day out at work.

In between I wanted to try out Arch Linux so I installed it on my ThinkPad, and man this was a performance boost, it felt like a new machine in comperison to Ubuntu. Nowadays I run Arch at work too. For stuff which doesn't work, like some specific version of Yocto, I wrap it into a docker container with a Ubuntu image for compatibility.

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Reddit: The current state of video editing on Linux 2017?

Sunday 15th of January 2017 11:26:52 AM

Linux has a lot of software option when it comes to video editors. However, after trying around five of the most popular, is still hard for me to use them for serious video editing. Some even offer 4K video editing capability but fail short even when editing 5 min clips on full 1080p. Please let me know what you think? What is you experience editing video on Linux?

submitted by /u/glezweb
[link] [comments]

Reddit: Scriptable Cat Shock Collar

Sunday 15th of January 2017 11:22:12 AM

Hi,

I have a new cat which I am trying to train its behavior. When I am at home I use regular training tips, like spraying water on the cat when she does something bad, attention it when it did bad things, etc. I want to install some web cams or IP cams inside my room where my cat usually sits and it does something bad to shock it. I have some Linux based embedded boards that I can use to connect the web cam and shock collars, but I can't find a cat shock collar that is easily scriptable. They usually come either with a remote control that can be used in the house, or a solution which uses a bluetooth and a smartphone with a special app.

Does anyone know an easy scriptable cat shock collar?

submitted by /u/mehnuggets
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: TedPage: The Case for Ubuntu Phone

Sunday 15th of January 2017 11:13:00 AM

What I find most interesting thing about this discussion is that it is the original reason that Google bought Android. They were concerned that with Apple controlling the smartphone market they’d be in a position to damage Google’s ability to compete in services. They were right. But instead of opening it up to competition (a competition that certainly at the time and even today they’re likely to win) they decided to lock down Android with their own services. So now we see in places like China where Google services are limited there is no way for Android to win, only forks that use a different set of integrations. One has to wonder if Ubuntu Phone existed earlier whether Google would have bought Android, while Ubuntu Phone competes with Android it doesn’t pose any threat to Google’s core businesses.

It is always a failure to try and convince people to change their patterns and devices just for the sake of change. Early adopters are people who enjoy that, but not the majority of people. This means that we need to be an order of magnitude better, which is a pretty high bar to set, but one I enjoy working towards. I think that Ubuntu Phone has the fundamental DNA to win in this race.

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LXer: Top 5: Most common Linux issues, Exercism for programming skills, and more

Sunday 15th of January 2017 11:12:18 AM
In this week's Top 5, we highlight common Linux issues, Exercism to improve your programming skills, how to get started as an open source programmer, a few to-do list managers, and Clang-format for clean code.

TuxMachines: MX Linux MX-16 Metamorphosis - Winds of change

Sunday 15th of January 2017 10:44:26 AM

MX Linux MX-16 Metamorphosis is a very decent distribution. It's a small product, not very well known, and probably not your first home choice when it comes to Linux. But then, despite its humble upbringing, it does offer a powerful punch. You get all the goodies out of the box, and except for some Bluetooth issues and less-than-trivial customization, the slate is spotless. Music, phones, speed, battery life, fun, all there.

Of course, the question is, can MX Linux sustain this record. If we look back, there were some rough patches, a bit of identity crisis, and the existential question of quality, the same journey that Xubuntu underwent. But then it kind of peaked and degraded some recently. Will MX Linux follow the same path? The last few years were good, with a steady, consistent improvement on all fronts. Then again, I thought Xubuntu was invincible, too.

For the time being, predicting the future remains tricky. However, here and now, MX-16 is a great choice for a lightweight desktop. Xfce has come a long way, and you get all the essentials you expect from a home system. It's all there, plus good looks, plus speed that rivals anything out there, among the best battery life numbers, great stability, and even some extra unique features like the live session save and MX Tools. A most worthy combo. All in all, 9.5/10. Warmly recommended for testing and sampling.

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TuxMachines: Intro To Netrunner Desktop 17.01 GNU/Linux for Beginners

Sunday 15th of January 2017 10:32:49 AM

This review of Netrunner Desktop 17.01 GNU/Linux is intended for end users and beginners. Netrunner is a desktop oriented operating system, ships with complete daily-usage desktop applications, and full multimedia codecs support. It means once the users install Netrunner they do not need to install anything anymore for all daily works. In this article you will find 12 points of review, download links, and some notes at the end. Enjoy it.

Also: Devil-Linux 1.8.0-rc2 released

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Reddit: Hawaii merged with Papyros and is now Liri OS

Sunday 15th of January 2017 10:18:16 AM

LXer: Killer Open Source Software

Sunday 15th of January 2017 09:17:56 AM
Open source's popularity continues to bloom. There is a staggering volume of proven open source software available to download. This compilation selects the best-of-breed ranging from software coded by individual programmers, small teams of enthusiasts, extending to large multinational corporations. We mostly recommend cross-platform software, but, where appropriate, make some exceptions.

TuxMachines: Security News

Sunday 15th of January 2017 08:33:59 AM
  • How we secure our infrastructure: a white paper

    Trust in the cloud is paramount to any business who is thinking about using it to power their critical applications, deliver new customer experiences and house their most sensitive data. Today, we're issuing a white paper by our security team that details how security is designed into our infrastructure from the ground up.

    Google Cloud’s global infrastructure provides security through the entire information processing lifecycle.This infrastructure provides secure deployment of services, secure storage of data with end-user privacy safeguards, secure communications between services, secure and private communication with customers over the internet and safe operation by administrators.

  • Google Infrastructure Security Design Overview [Ed: Google banned Windows internally]

    The content contained herein is correct as of January 2017, and represents the status quo as of the time it was written. Google’s security policies and systems may change going forward, as we continually improve protection for our customers.

  • Microsoft Says Windows 7 Has Outdated Security, Wants You to Move to Windows 10 [Ed: all versions are insecure BY DESIGN]

    Windows 10 is now running on more than 20 percent of the world’s desktop computers, and yet, Microsoft’s bigger challenge isn’t necessarily to boost the market share of its latest operating system, but to convince those on Windows 7 to upgrade.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 Officially Released, Includes over 85 Security Updates

    If you're using Debian Stable (a.k.a. Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie"), it's time to update it now. Why? Because Debian Project launched a new release, Debian GNU/Linux 8.7, which includes over 170 bug fixes and security updates.

  • CVS: cvs.openbsd.org: src

    Disable and lock Silicon Debug feature on modern Intel CPUs

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Leftovers: Software and HowTos

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  • Kodi 17.0 "Krypton" Release Candidate 3 Updates Estuary Skin, Fixes More Bugs
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