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Updated: 1 hour 42 min ago

LXer: The Tiny Internet Project, Part I

Thursday 29th of September 2016 12:40:14 PM
As LJ readers well know, Linux drives many of thetechnologies we use every day, from smart TVs to Web servers. Linux iseverywhere—except most homes and classrooms.

Reddit: So what's going on with the Lenovo Yogas?

Thursday 29th of September 2016 12:29:26 PM

I've recently started getting more interested in Linux and I'm going to upgrade from my 2011 Macbook Pro to a Windows machine when the Kaby Lake laptops start showing up to dual boot Windows and Linux on.

I want to get a 2 in 1 machine and the Lenovo Yoga 710 is the machine I'm the most interested in, but I've seen a lot of posts here and on tech websites that Lenovo prevents you from installing other OS's on the Yoga due to something with the hard drive configuration? Is that true or is it just disinformation being spread around?

I've read that it has something to do with Microsoft Signature Edition machines, is the problem only affecting those machines?

submitted by /u/Zalbu
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Reddit: i need help guys

Thursday 29th of September 2016 12:19:39 PM

so i recently installed linux gnome 2.30.0, for the first time. I installed it on a laptop that is very old (HP Pavilion za5700) and i cant install the wifi adapted driver. I am using an external usb adapter because the one in the laptop didnt work. The wifi adapter DPO_RT3562_3052_LinuxSTA_V2.4.1.1_20101217, this is the name if the folder that the cd had for linux installations. I am a total newb in linux and in programming so if you guys can help me i will be very thankfull :)

submitted by /u/NugetHD
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TuxMachines: Sony Xperia X Compact review: Small Android is still good, but not much better

Thursday 29th of September 2016 12:19:35 PM

Sony's Xperia X Compact is basically the newest version of the Z5 Compact that hit the US earlier this year. But just because it's a newer version of the (comparatively) tiny handset doesn't mean it's an upgrade in every way. Sony is pushing the camera sensors in the X Compact and the flagship-level XZ, as well as new features like five-axis image stabilization and HDR photo mode. Sony knows cameras, so we know the shooter in the X Compact will at least be competent. However, it has to be good enough to encourage photography buffs to shell out $499 for this unlocked handset while delivering solid performance across the board as well.

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TuxMachines: Linux Mint's XApps to Get Screen Blanking, Sublime-like Search Bar Lands for Xed

Thursday 29th of September 2016 12:14:16 PM

We already know that work on Linux Mint 18.1, the next major release of the popular Ubuntu-based operating system loved by many users, already begun, and Clement Lefebvre shares with us today some of the improvements coming to XApps.

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TuxMachines: Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.18 Tool for Creating Snaps in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Thursday 29th of September 2016 12:13:01 PM

Canonical, through Sergio Schvezov, announced the release of yet another maintenance update to the Snapcraft open-source utility that helps application developers package their apps as Snaps.

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TuxMachines: The Tiny Internet Project, Part I

Thursday 29th of September 2016 12:11:33 PM

As LJ readers well know, Linux drives many of the technologies we use every day, from smart TVs to Web servers. Linux is everywhere—except most homes and classrooms.

That's a problem if we want to help breed the next generation of engineers and computer scientists. In fact, if teenagers (or any other group of curious individuals) want to learn about Linux, they often must rely on a geeky friend or parent willing to show them the way.

This three-part series seeks to change that by offering a way for anyone to learn about Linux by building what is essentially a tiny, self-contained Internet. Using old equipment and free software, you'll build a private network (with your own domain name), build Web sites, set up an e-mail server, install and use a database, and set up a Linux distro mirror.

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Phoronix: Ubuntu 16.10 Doesn't Change Much With Performance, Clear Linux Still Leads In Most Tests

Thursday 29th of September 2016 11:58:25 AM
Given yesterday's Ubuntu 16.10 final beta release ahead of the official "Yakkety Yak" debut in two weeks, I decided to run some benchmarks of Ubuntu 16.10 compared to Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS on the same system plus also throwing in the Intel Clear Linux distribution given it tends to be one of the most performant...

Reddit: LWN.net Weekly Edition for September 22, 2016

Thursday 29th of September 2016 10:37:02 AM

Reddit: Linux on 2x 4K sluggish performance?

Thursday 29th of September 2016 10:20:35 AM

Hey everybody,

I recently upgraded by 2x 1080p screen setup to a 4K display. Running Ubuntu with Unity ended up being very pleasant with good UI scaling. Unfortunately I kinda missed a second monitor so I decided to get a second 4K display (same model).

I arrived yesterday and I've noticed some concerning performance drops and I don't know where to attribute them.

Basically, when both 4K displays are enabled (one over DP, one over HDMI), I get significant lag on the HDMI display (only 30hz refresh rate) but the DP display also starts lagging, generally everything becomes more sluggish and unpleasant to use (I can record a video if you're interested).

The way I say it there are 4 things on my mind right now:

  1. Does anyone else have this setup and can confirm any problems? (Aka is it a Linux problem?)
  2. Is my CPU the bottleneck?
  3. Is my GPU the bottleneck?
  4. Is the HDMI connection causing issues?

My hardware:

  • Phenom II X6, 1090T @ 3.8GHz (quite old and slow)
  • Sapphire R9 380X, 4GB
  • 16GB DDR3 1600MHz
  • Running Kernel 4.8-rc7, Mesa 12.1, amdgpu

I'm wondering if some of you guys have similar setups as me (aka 2x 4K side by side) and if you're having problems. And if not, what hardware are you using?

I'm trying to narrow down the sources of potential problems to decide if I should send back the monitor or if it's worth upgrading a different component in my system to make it work. Thanks.

submitted by /u/KateTheAwesome
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TuxMachines: Don’t be a stranger to GIMP, be GIMP…

Thursday 29th of September 2016 10:03:51 AM

I can try and do more coding, more code reviewing, revive designing discussions… that’s cool, yet never enough. GIMP needs more people, developers, designers, community people, writers for the website or the documentation, tutorial makers… everyone is welcome in my grand scheme!

Many of my actions lately have been towards gathering more people, so when I heard about the GNOME newcomers initiative during GUADEC, I thought that could be a good fit. Thus a few days ago, I had GIMP added in the list of newcomer-friendly GNOME projects, with me as the newcomers mentor. I’ll catch this occasion to remind you all the ways you can contribute to GIMP, and not necessarily as a developer.

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LXer: Raspberry Pi Foundation Unveils New LXDE-Based Desktop for Raspbian Called PIXEL

Thursday 29th of September 2016 09:48:41 AM
Raspberry Pi Foundation's Simon Long proudly unveiled a new desktop environment for the Debian-based Raspbian GNU/Linux operating system for Raspberry Pi devices.

TuxMachines: Node.js 6.x LTS coming to EPEL 7

Thursday 29th of September 2016 09:44:59 AM

Node.js® is a JavaScript runtime built on Chrome’s V8 JavaScript engine. It uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient. Its package ecosystem, npm, is the largest ecosystem of open source libraries in the world. You can read more about Node.js at the project website.

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TuxMachines: Microsoft is no longer Russia’s first choice of technology provider

Thursday 29th of September 2016 09:40:56 AM

The city of Moscow is contemplating ditching Microsoft’s technology as president Vladimir Putin urges state officials and local businesses to scale down their reliance on foreign software providers.

In turn, the city is replacing Microsoft’s products with solutions from local competitors.

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TuxMachines: Alphabet's Plans to Create Android PCs Should Make Microsoft a Little Nervous

Thursday 29th of September 2016 09:38:53 AM

Four years after Microsoft (MSFT) first tried to give the world unified PC/mobile operating systems via the dual fiascoes known as Windows 8 and Windows RT, Alphabet's (GOOGL) Google appears set to take its own stab at the concept. And there are reasons to think the company will see a measure of success.

Citing "two independent and reliable sources," Android Police reports Google plans to launch a notebook in the third quarter of 2017 that will likely be the first new device to showcase Andromeda, a version of Android that will integrate many features associated with Google's Chrome OS PC operating system.

The notebook will reportedly be called the Pixel 3, and carry a $788 price. Its feature set reportedly include a 12.3-inch display, an Intel (INTC) processor, a glass trackpad, a tablet mode and stylus support.

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Reddit: Cool little FOSS projects that you have found

Thursday 29th of September 2016 09:34:01 AM

Have you found any cool little FOSS projects that you would like to tell others about?

I will list a few recent ones that I have found to start the discussion:

  • Wed – terminal text editor with Windows-style keybindings
  • Powerline – attractive statusline plugin for Vim, Bash, Zsh and Tmux
  • My Weather Indicator – weather indicator for Unity system tray
  • Rainbowstream – command line Twitter application
  • Corebird – excellent GUI Twitter app
  • Dillo – minimalistic, extremely fast graphical web browser
submitted by /u/jones_supa
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TuxMachines: Servers/Networks

Thursday 29th of September 2016 09:15:25 AM
  • Linux servers deliver greater performance and efficiency 'than available on any x86-based server'
  • What are configuration management tools?

    For most people, computers don't stay the same. Software is added, removed, and updated. Configurations are changed. Think about the changes you've made to your computer since the first time you booted it up. Now imagine making those changes to 10, 100, or 1,000 more computers. Configuration management tools are what make implemententing and enforcing these changes possible.

  • 5 new OpenStack tutorials and guides
  • Ericsson: The Journey to a DevOps Future in SDN

    There are big transformations going on in the world today that are driving rapid changes to the business of networks, said Santiago Rodriguez, VP of Engineering and head of the product development unit SDN & Policy Control at Ericsson, in his keynote Tuesday at OpenDaylight Summit.

    “Society is transforming, the way we do business is transforming, and accordingly the way we build our networks is transforming,” Rodriguez said.

    The three pillars of this network transformation include: 5G, virtualization and open source.

  • OpenDaylight sets product quality label, metrics for SDN solutions

    Initial OpenDaylight-based products expected to receive the "Powered by OpenDaylight" mark are offerings from Brocade, Ericsson, HPE, Inocybe and Serro.

  • Telstra Sees Quadrupled Data Capacity by 2020

    The latter service led Telstra to re-think its fiber deployment strategy, choosing to use pre-provisioned fiber connections to data centers in advance of customer demand, because the company knew that demand was coming, Blackall said. The strategy worked well with Telstra's acquisition of Pacnet, which had already deployed SDN capabilities to connect its 27 points of presence around Asia.

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TuxMachines: Games for GNU/Linux

Thursday 29th of September 2016 09:12:40 AM
  • Valve's Steam Controller With SteamOS/Linux Support Is Now Listed For Just $35

    If you have been put off from ordering a Steam Controller for your SteamOS/Linux gaming system due to the $50 USD price-tag, it's been marked down to $35.

    Back in June it was temporarily reduced to $35 USD but then a few days later shot back up to $50 at major Internet retailers. Judging from those that clicked our Amazon links, it was of interest to many readers. If you missed that discount the first time around, the Steam Controller is back to being listed as a $34.99 product.

    It's not clear how long this deal will last or if it is permanent -- there has been speculations about a "Steam Controller 2" but I haven't seen any public confirmation yet.

  • Game Developer Chooses To Connect With Pirates, Reaps Rewards As A Result

    One imagines that this kind of thing builds up goodwill amongst potential buyers of PM Studio games. Some of the comments on the thread state as much. It won't do anything with the pure-pirate folks out there, but, then again, nothing will. Worrying about those that were never going to buy the game would have been wasted time and energy. Instead, the developer chose to try to win over those that might indeed want to support its efforts.

    Here's hoping PM Games gets the positive reinforcement needed to confirm that this kind of thing is the right way to deal with piracy. And that other studios are paying attention, as well.

  • InXile Entertainment announced Wasteland 3, will use crowdfunding on fig

    I'm going off their twitter and other sites for the main info right now, as it seems we are still not on InXile's press list.

    It is already confirmed to have Linux support, along with multiplayer, vehicles, and some form of base building.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat, Logicalis in digital transformation partnership in Latin America
    PromonLogicalis, a provider of information technology and communication solutions and services in Latin America, and Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, announced a collaboration that aim to help organizations navigate the digital transformation of their infrastructures to pave the way for cloud and the software-defined technologies, and to advance open source technology awareness in the region. Open source is delivering significant advancements in many areas of technology through community-powered innovation, including cloud computing, mobile, big data, and more. And, as companies embrace modern technology as a competitive advantage via digital transformation efforts, many are turning to open source because of the flexibility and agility it can enable.
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Downgraded by Zacks Investment Research to “Hold”
  • An Easy Way To Try Intel & RADV Vulkan Drivers On Fedora 24
    Fedora 25 should have good support for the open-source Vulkan Linux drivers (particularly if it lands the next Mesa release) while Fedora 24 users can now more easily play with the latest Mesa Git RADV and Intel ANV Vulkan drivers via a new repository. A Phoronix reader has setup a Fedora Copr repository that is building Intel's Vulkan driver from Mesa Git plus the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver re-based from its source (David Airlie's semi-interesting GitHub branch). Fedora COPR, for the uninformed, is the distribution's equivalent to Ubuntu PPA repositories.
  • Meeting users, lots of users
    Every year, I introduce Fedora to new students at Brno Technical University. There are approx. 500 of them and a sizable amount of them then installs Fedora. We also organize a sort of installfest one week after the presentation where anyone who has had any difficulties with Fedora can come and ask for help. It’s a great opportunity to observe what things new users struggle with the most. Especially when you have such a high number of new users. What are my observations this year?

Linux Devices

  • 96Boards SBCs host Intel Joule and Curie IoT modules
    Gumstix announced two SBCs this week, based on Intel Joule and Curie IoT modules and built to 96Boards CE and IE form-factor specifications, respectively. At Linaro Connect Las Vegas 2016, where earlier this week Linaro’s 96Boards.org announced a new 96Boards IoT Edition (IE) spec, Gumstix announced support for 96Boards.org’s open SBC standards with two new single-board computers. Both SBCs will be available for purchase in October.
  • ORWL — First Open Source And Physically Secure PC, Runs Linux And Windows
    ORWL is the first open source, physically secure computer. Using a secure microcontroller (MCU) and an ‘active clamshell mesh’, the device makes sure that nobody breaks the security of the system. Its maker, Design Shift, has also launched a crowdfunding campaign on Crowd Supply.
  • Purism Is Still Hoping To Build A GNU/Linux Free Software Librem Smartphone
    Purism, the startup behind the Librem laptops with a focus on free software and user privacy/freedom, still has their minds set on coming up with a GNU/Linux smartphone. Purism continues selling their high-priced laptops and their Librem 11 is forthcoming as an Intel-based tablet/convertible device with stocking station. Next on their horizon they want to produce "the ideal no-carrier, Free Software phone running a bona fide GNU+Linux stack."

Leftovers: OSS

  • Asterisk 14 Improves Open-Source VoIP
    Digium, the lead commercial sponsor behind the Asterisk open source PBX project announced the release Asterisk 14 this week, continuing to evolve the decade old effort, making it easier to use and deploy.
  • Yahoo open-sources a deep learning model for classifying pornographic images
    Yahoo today announced its latest open-source release: a model that can figure out if images are specifically pornographic in nature. The system uses a type of artificial intelligence called deep learning, which involves training artificial neural networks on lots of data (like dirty images) and getting them to make inferences about new data. The model that’s now available on GitHub under a BSD 2-Clause license comes pre-trained, so users only have to fine-tune it if they so choose. The model works with the widely used Caffe open source deep learning framework. The team trained the model using its now open source CaffeOnSpark system. The new model could be interesting to look at for developers maintaining applications like Instagram and Pinterest that are keen to minimize smut. Search engine operators like Google and Microsoft might also want to check out what’s under the hood here. “To the best of our knowledge, there is no open source model or algorithm for identifying NSFW images,” Yahoo research engineer Jay Mahadeokar and senior director of product management Gerry Pesavento wrote in a blog post.
  • Cloudera, Hortonworks, and Uber to Keynote at Apache Big Data and ApacheCon Europe
  • Vendors Pile on Big Data News at Strata
    Cloudera, Pentaho and Alation are among vendors making Big Data announcements at this week's Strata event. Vendors big and small are making news at this week's Strata + Hadoop event as they try to expand their portion of the Big Data market. Cloudera highlighted a trio of Apache Software Foundation (ASF) projects to which it contributes. Among them is Spark 2.0, which benefits from a new Dataset API that offers the promise of better usability and performance as well as new machine learning libraries.
  • New alliances focus on open-source, data science empowerment
    How can data science make a true market impact? Partnerships, particularly amongst open source communities. As IBM solidifies its enterprise strategies around data demands, two new partnerships emerge: one with Continuum Analytics, Inc., advancing open-source analytics for the enterprise; and another with Galvanize, initiating a Data Science for Executives program. Continuum Analytics, the creator and driving force behind Anaconda — a leading open data science platform powered by Python — has allied with IBM to advance open-source analytics for the enterprise. Data scientists and data engineers in open-source communities can now embrace Python and R to develop analytic and machine learning models in the Spark environment through its integration with IBM’s DataWorks Project. The new agreement between IBM and Galvanize, which provides a dynamic learning community for technology, will offer an assessment, analysis and training element for Galvanize’s Data Science for Executives program. This program empowers corporations to better understand, use and maximize the value of their data. The program will support IBM’s DataFirst Method, a methodology that IBM says provides the strategy, expertise and game plan to help ensure enterprise customers’ succeed on their journey to become a data-driven business.
  • Apache Spot: open source big data analytics for cyber
  • Chinese open source blockchain startup Antshares raises $4.5M through crowdsourcing [Ed: Microsoft-connected]
  • August and September 2016: photos from Pittsburgh and Fresno
  • Libre Learn Lab: a summit on freely licensed resources for education
    Libre Learn Lab is a two-day summit for people who create, use and implement freely licensed resources for K-12 education, bringing together educators, policy experts, software developers, hardware hackers, and activists to share best practices and address the challenges of widespread adoption of these resources in education. The 2nd biennial conference is Saturday, October 8th, and Sunday, October 9th, at the MIT Tang Center. The keynote addresses will be delivered by the FSF’s own Richard M. Stallman, former Chief Open Education Advisor Andrew Marcinek and founder of HacKIDemia Stefania Druga. At the event, there will be a special tribute to Dr. Seymour Papert (the father of educational computing) by Dr. Cynthia Solomon.

Security Leftovers

  • Friday's security advisories
  • ICANN grinds forward on crucial DNS root zone signing key update
    The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers is moving -- carefully -- to upgrade the DNS root zone key by which all domains can be authenticated under the DNS Security Extensions protocol. ICANN is the organization responsible for managing the Domain Name System, and DNS Security Extensions (DNSSEC) authenticates DNS responses, preventing man-in-the-middle attacks in which the attacker hijacks legitimate domain resolution requests and replaces them with fraudulent domain addresses. DNSSEC still relies on the original DNS root zone key generated in 2010. That 1024-bit RSA key is scheduled to be replaced with a 2048-bit RSA key next October. Although experts are split over the effectiveness of DNSSEC, the update of the current root zone key signing key (KSK) is long overdue.
  • Cybersecurity isn't an IT problem, it's a business problem
    The emergence of the CISO is a relatively recent phenomenon at many companies. Their success often relies upon educating the business from the ground up. In the process, companies become a lot better about how to handle security and certainly learn how not to handle it. As a CIO, knowing the pulse of security is critical. I oversee a monthly technology steering committee that all the executives attend. The CISO reports during this meeting on the state of the security program. He also does an excellent job of putting risk metrics out there, color coded by red, yellow, and green. This kind of color grading allows us to focus attention on where we are and what we’re doing about it.