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Updated: 48 min 15 sec ago

Phoronix: X.Org Foundation Decides On Its Women Outreach Project

Friday 31st of October 2014 12:27:34 PM
At yesterday's X.Org Foundation Board of Directors meeting they approved one project for the Outreach Program for Women...

LXer: Drupal Users Had Seven Hours to Patch or Be Hacked

Friday 31st of October 2014 12:22:24 PM
How the Drupal project was able to define the window of vulnerability is thanks in no small part to its community of hosting vendors. Greg Knaddison, director of engineering at Card.com and a member of the Drupal Security Team, explained to eWEEK that several companies that provide hosting focused on Drupal decided to create platform-level protection against this issue that not only mitigated the attacks, but also recorded data about them.

Slashdot: Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

Friday 31st of October 2014 12:04:00 PM
ewhac writes: "I'm probably going to deeply deeply regret this, but every time a story appears here mentioning systemd, a 700-comment thread of back-and-forth bickering breaks out which is about as informative as an old Bud Light commercial, and I don't really learn anything new about the subject. My gut reaction to systemd is (currently) a negative one, and it's very easy to find screeds decrying systemd on the net. However, said screeds haven't been enough to prevent its adoption by several distros, which leads me to suspect that maybe there's something worthwhile there that I haven't discovered yet. So I thought it might be instructive to turn the question around and ask the membership about what makes systemd good. However, before you stab at the "Post" button, there are some rules... Bias Disclosure: I currently dislike systemd because — without diving very deeply into the documentation, mind — it looks and feels like a poorly-described, gigantic mess I know nothing about that seeks to replace other poorly-described, smaller messes which I know a little bit about. So you will be arguing in that environment." Nice Things About systemd Rules: Post each new Nice Thing as a new post, not as a reply to another post. This will let visitors skim the base level of comments for things that interest them, rather than have to dive through a fractally expanding tree of comments looking for things to support/oppose. It will also make it easier to follow the next rule: Avoid duplication; read the entire base-level of comments before adding a new Nice Thing. Someone may already have mentioned your Nice Thing. Add your support/opposition to that Nice Thing there, rather than as a new post. Only one concrete Nice Thing about systemd per base-level post. Keep the post focused on a single Nice Thing systemd does. If you know of multiple distinct things, write multiple distinct posts. Describe the Nice Thing in some detail. Don't assume, for example, that merely saying "Supports Linux cgroups" will be immediately persuasive. Describe how the Nice Thing is better than existing, less controversial solutions. systemd is allegedly better at some things than sysvinit or upstart or inetd. Why? Why is the Nice Thing possible in systemd, and impossible (or extremely difficult) with anything else? (In some cases, the Nice Thing will be a completely new thing that's never existed before; describe why it's good thing.)We will assume out of the gate that systemd boots your system faster than ${SOMETHING_ELSE}, so no points for bringing that up. Bonus points are awarded for: Personal Experience. "I actually did this," counts for way more than, "The docs claim you can do this." Working Examples. Corollary to the above — if you did a Nice Thing with systemd, consider also posting the code/script/service file you wrote to accomplish it. Links to Supporting Documentation. If you leveraged a Nice Thing, furnish a link to the docs you used that describe the Nice Thing and its usage.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








LXer: Collection of Useful Bash Functions and Aliases

Friday 31st of October 2014 11:25:13 AM
What follows is a collection of some of the aliases and functions that I use frequently, and which I believe may be useful to others as well. I showed them here in no particular order.

LinuxToday: Atom-based Ubuntu Touch tablet specs leaked

Friday 31st of October 2014 11:00:00 AM

 LinuxGizmos: Specs have been leaked for a 10.1-inch Ubuntu Touch tablet called UT One that runs on an Intel Atom Z3735D SoC, with shipments expected in December.

Reddit: Diary of a new Arch user, week two

Friday 31st of October 2014 10:30:42 AM

LXer: Atom-based Ubuntu Touch tablet specs leaked

Friday 31st of October 2014 10:28:02 AM
Specs have been leaked for a 10.1-inch Ubuntu Touch tablet called “UT One” that runs on an Intel Atom Z3735D SoC, with shipments expected in December. The UT One tablet was revealed by Phoronix, which said the leak came from Andrew Bernstein, a Linux developer who had previously launched a failed Arch Linux spinoff called “Operating System U” that included the MATE desktop environment and Wayland windows manager.

TuxMachines: Quick Look: Puppy Linux 6.0

Friday 31st of October 2014 10:04:29 AM

Puppy Linux 6.0 is a lightweight Linux distribution that can easily be run off a USB stick, SD card or live disc. This version has been dubbed “Tahrpup” by the Puppy Linux developers, and it is based on Ubuntu 14.04. It also uses Linux kernel 3.14.20.

If you’ve never used Puppy Linux before you might want to check out Wikipedia’s excellent overview of it. It will give you useful background information and let you know what you can expect from Puppy before trying it. You can also check out the official Puppy Linux 6.0 announcement thread in the Puppy Linux forum.

read more

LXer: Canonical Adds Ubuntu OpenStack Distribution for Open Source Cloud Computing

Friday 31st of October 2014 09:30:51 AM
Canonical has announced its own distribution of OpenStack, the open source cloud computing operating system, built on top of Ubuntu Linux. Ubuntu Linux has already enjoyed the distinction of being the most popular platform for hosting OpenStack clouds. But now, Canonical has taken its commitment to OpenStack a step further with the announcement of its own OpenStack distribution.

TuxMachines: How to train your doctor... to use open source

Friday 31st of October 2014 09:14:42 AM

The federal hospitals are running a system that was released in to the public domain called VistA, written in MUMPS. This is the same language that the $100 million software is written in! Except there is a huge difference in price. OSEHRA was founded to protect this software.

read more

Reddit: How Do I Know If Linux Is Right For Me?

Friday 31st of October 2014 09:04:50 AM

LXer: Quick Look: Puppy Linux 6.0

Friday 31st of October 2014 08:33:40 AM
Puppy Linux 6.0 is a lightweight Linux distribution that can easily be run off a USB stick, SD card or live disc. This version has been dubbed “Tahrpup” by the Puppy Linux developers, and it is based on Ubuntu 14.04. It also uses Linux kernel 3.14.20.

TuxMachines: Sony Xperia devices are sendng your data to China

Friday 31st of October 2014 08:18:19 AM

If you are using a Sony Xperia device running either Android 4.4.2 or 4.4.4 it’s advised (by me) that you install a custom ROM on your device. Several reports have appeared online that the stock firmware on these devices contains Baidu spyware that is discreetly sending data back to servers in China, you do not need to have installed any software on your phone as it’s bundled into the firmware.

read more

TuxMachines: Nexus 6 Pre-Orders Were A Joke

Friday 31st of October 2014 08:11:37 AM

Today, the Nexus 6 went up for pre-order on the Google Play Store for a grand total of five minutes by my count. No warning, no announcements, no broadcasts from the Nexus Twitter account, no excitement from Sundar Pichai or any other Android leaders, nothing. I, like many of you, had no idea that pre-orders had even started. And by the time I tried to go order, it was too late. Sold out, gone. Nexus 4 all over again.

read more

TuxMachines: Fedora 21 Beta status is Go, release on November 4, 2014

Friday 31st of October 2014 08:00:08 AM

At the Fedora 21 Beta Go/No-Go Meeting #3 that just occurred, it was agreed to Go with the Fedora 21 Beta by Fedora QA, Release Engineering and Development.

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TuxMachines: GTK+ 3.16's New GtkGLArea Widget Gets Improved

Friday 31st of October 2014 07:57:20 AM

Earlier this month GTK+ 3.16 development code gained native OpenGL support. This GTK+ OpenGL support involved adding support for wrapping an OpenGL context for native windows with GLX on X11 and EGL on Wayland to use OpenGL to paint everything. A GtkGLArea widget was also added for providing OpenGL drawing access within GTK+ applications. The GtkGLArea has already seen some more improvements to better GTK's OpenGL support.

read more

TuxMachines: CherryTree Review: The Rich Tree Notes Application

Friday 31st of October 2014 07:52:27 AM

CherryTree is a notes-taking application which organizes your notes into a hierarchical tree, has support for text formatting, and is written in GTK2/Python. Lately this application has got a lot of attention due to rich features and frequent updates. It also comes by default in distributions such as MakuluLinux MATE Edition.

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TuxMachines: The Wide World of Canonical

Friday 31st of October 2014 07:47:54 AM

I thought perhaps it was a one-off mistake made by a marketing department flunky who perhaps had too much Red Bull while writing a press release. Being the responsible company that Canonical/Ubuntu is, and being the good FOSS community member that it portrays itself to be, I assumed they’d fix the error right away and make sure that ludicrous hyperbole was not the order of the day.
Would that be asking too much?

Perhaps. Sadly, a company that claims to be a FOSS leader can’t be bothered with getting simple facts correct. An ad on LinkedIn posted a week ago today makes the same claim for a job in London. You can click on the photo to the right and read, “It is used by over 20 million people in 240 countries in 80 languages.”

read more

LXer: Detailed Report Shows How ISPs Are Making 'Business Choice' To Make Your Internet Connection Terrible

Friday 31st of October 2014 07:36:29 AM
A couple of years ago, we wrote about an effort by the big broadband players to push the FCC away from using M-Lab to measure basic network diagnostics on the internet. M-Lab is a very interesting project, focused on collecting a huge amount of data about internet performance, and making that data widely available. In the past, for example, we've highlighted an M-Lab project showing which ISPs were throttling BitTorrent.Now, M-Lab has released a new report, along with all of the data and a very nice tool to analyze it all, called the Internet Observatory, that looks at ISP interconnection and, most importantly, its impact on consumer internet performance.

More in Tux Machines

grep-2.21 released [stable]

This is to announce grep-2.21, a stable release. There have been 94 commits by 3 people in the 25 weeks since 2.20. Read more Also: GNU Parallel 20141122 ('Rosetta') released

SUSE invests in software-defined storage

SUSE, the enterprise Linux company, is working on its own storage solution using open-source Ceph: SUSE Storage. Read more

Linux 3.18-rc6

Steady progress towards final release, although we still have a big unknown worry in a regression that Dave Jones reported and that we haven't solved yet. In the process of chasing that one down, there's been a fair amount of looking at various low-level details, and that found some dubious issues, but no smoking gun yet. But that explains some of the patches in rc6.. Read more

Open Source Code Contains Fewer Defects, But There's a Catch

Research suggests that software developed using open source code contains fewer defects than that built with proprietary code. The catch is that open source code rarely benefits from security teams specifically tasked with looking for bugs. Read more