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Updated: 1 hour 26 min ago

TuxMachines: The August 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Saturday 6th of August 2016 06:32:12 PM

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the August 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

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TuxMachines: (GNU/)Linux Releases and Linux Foundation

Saturday 6th of August 2016 06:12:34 PM

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TuxMachines: Server Administration

Saturday 6th of August 2016 06:12:12 PM
  • 8 Open Source/Commercial Billing Platforms for Hosting Providers

    In this article you will find the most popular billing solutions, both commercial and open-source, which functionality is tailored for business needs of hosting providers.

  • The Core Technologies for Deep Learning

    Given the compute and data intensive nature of deep learning which has significant overlaps with the needs of the high performance computing market, the TOP500 list provides a good proxy of the current market dynamics and trends.

  • Google Open Sources Its 48V Data Center Rack

    Google is sharing Open Rack v2.0, a proposed standard for a data center rack that runs on 48-volt power, with the Open Compute Project (OCP). The company is gathering feedback on the standard before final submission.

    Google announced the contribution via a blog post today, noting that it has been collaborating with Facebook on it. If the standard is accepted, it will be Google’s first contributions to the OCP community.

  • Moving from a single machine with Docker to a cluster of Pi’s

    I decided to finally make use of my four Raspberry Pi model 3’s and take the challenge to move all of my home services to them. Previously, I ran a x86 Desktop as a server in my living room. The loud noises coming from the server made it uncomfortable to be in sometimes. The loud noisy box is home to this website and many other applications such as Plex, Transmission, OpenVPN, Jenkins, Samba, and various Node.js projects all running in Docker. Having all of those applications running on a single box is a single point of failure and makes system administration harder when reboots are required.

    To make administration easier, I decided that one Pi should be a load balancer for as many applications as possible. Yes, I know that having a single Pi as a load balancer is also a single point of failure but it makes administrating the other Pi’s easier. I researched how to do HTTP and TCP load balancing with NGINX and made a Docker container for it which runs on one Pi.

    Now I needed to think about where to run all of these containers and made a mental map of where to run them. I decided the best way for deploying containers would be through a private local registry so I created a Docker registry on one of the Pi’s and pushed all of the images. Let’s take a look at the application architecture to see what each Raspberry Pi is doing.

  • CORD Project Will Help Service Providers Build Cloud-Like Networks

    The new Linux Foundation project will enable telcos to use SDN, NFV and cloud-based technologies along with white-box servers and bare-metal switches.
    Service providers and telecommunications companies have a new tool they can use in their efforts to transform their networks into highly scalable, agile and affordable infrastructures similar to those run by cloud providers.

  • IBM’s Linux Birthday, Oliver Stone’s ‘Snowden’ PSA & More…

    IBM and open source: Ian Murphy reminded us on Linux.com this week that it’s been eighteen years since IBM made a big bet on Linux and open source which eventually resulted in Big Blue pouring at least a couple of billion dollars into Linux development.

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: Software and Games

Saturday 6th of August 2016 06:11:22 PM
  • Audacious 3.8 Beta 1 Released, Available In PPA

    Audacious 3.8 beta 1 was released a couple of days ago and is available in the WebUpd8 Unstable PPA. The new version brings support for running multiple Audacious instances, a new plugin for the Qt interface, and various other improvements and bug fixes.

  • Total System Backup and Recall with Déjà Dup

    You will be hard pressed to find an easier, more reliable backup GUI for Linux than Déjà Dup. Although it might not have all the flexibility of some of its command-line counterparts, it is a solution that anyone can depend upon. Install it and schedule a regular backup of your important data...and hope that you never have to use (but rest assured it’s there).

  • RcppStreams 0.1.1

    A maintenance release of RcppStreams is now on CRAN. RcppStreams brings the excellent Streamulus C++ template library for event stream processing to R.

    Streamulus, written by Irit Katriel, uses very clever template meta-programming (via Boost Fusion) to implement an embedded domain-specific event language created specifically for event stream processing.

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.16 is now available.

  • New Commercial Wine Interface CrossOver Brings Impoved Support For Windows Apps
  • GCC 6.2 Is Coming Quite Soon

    Version 6.2 of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) is expected to come quite soon.

    This is important as GCC 6.2 is the first point release to the stable GCC6 compiler under the versioning scheme they rolled out last year: GCC 6.0 was development, GCC 6.1 was the first stable release, and GCC 6.2 is now the first point release. That's important since a number of distribution vendors tend to wait until around this first point release before incorporating a major new version of the GCC compiler.

  • The GNU C Library version 2.24 is now available
  • This Is the Police released for Linux, some thoughts on this intriguing strategy and adventure game

    The only thing I don't like is the checkpoint save system. You don't get to save the game whenever you like. It appears each day is a new save. I always get frustrated by checkpoint-only saves, so that's the only mark against the game in my personal opinion.

  • Classic Disney games, Transport Fever, and more Linux gaming news
  • Total War: Warhammer Heading To Mac & Linux

    Announced through a press release that was sent over earlier today, Total War: Warhammer will be heading towards both Mac and Linux later this year. The video game is developed by Creative Assembly in partnership with Games Workshop where gamers can expect a turn-based campaign filled with real-time battles.

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TuxMachines: KDE and GNOME

Saturday 6th of August 2016 06:09:40 PM
  • [GSoC] KDev-Embedded, OpenOCD and avrdude

    KDev-Embedded now have OpenOCD integration and a new interface to use avrdude in launcher.

    With Arduino-Makefile, it's possible to use a makefile to perform compilation of Arduino projects. In the video one the the examples are used to shows how it is possible to use the new avrdude launcher to execute the upload process.

  • Kontact build dependencies
  • WIP: Plasma World Map Wallpaper & World Clock Applet, powered by Marble

    The core of Marble, the virtual globe and world atlas, is a library, intended for reuse. Next to exposing its native C++ interface (see API dox of development version of the Marble library), there is also the option to use it in a QtQuick variant.

    The Marble code repository itself holds a few application and tools based on the library. Additionally it also has extensions & plugins for other applications & workspaces, like the KIO thumbnailer plugins for previews of KML, KMZ, GPX & GEOJSON files in KIO-using file manager or file dialogs, a Plasma Runner plugin for looking up geo coordinates or a world clock Plasma applet.

  • GNOME Maps and the tile problem

    The GNOME project's Maps application provides access to an array of mapping features (trip routing, address lookup, zoomable maps, etc.) from the desktop. Implementing that feature set requires hooking into a number of online services, but none of them is as prominent as the map tiles—the background images on top of which everything else is added in overlays. Recently, the tile provider that had served GNOME Maps well for several years ended its free service, suddenly cutting off all of GNOME Maps's users and forcing developers to consider new approaches for the future.

  • Yes, Someone Has Ported The Arc GTK Theme to Windows

    Last month we featured an Ubuntu theme for Windows 10 called Maverick — and a lot of you were pretty bemused by it. That theme aimed to bring the familiar look of Ubuntu and its Ambiance theme to the Windows 10 desktop. And, for the most part, does a decent job of aping the appearance.

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TuxMachines: More OSS Leftovers

Saturday 6th of August 2016 06:03:20 PM
  • FreeBSD 11.0 Has Been Pushed Back By One Week

    FreeBSD 11.0 has seen a very minor set-back in getting its release out the door.

    Due to a problem surrounding ZFS and VFS in 11.0, developers have decided to tack on an extra beta release and delay the branching and release candidates for FreeBSD 11.0.

  • Sales number for the Free Culture translation, first half of 2016

    As my regular readers probably remember, the last year I published a French and Norwegian translation of the classic Free Culture book by the founder of the Creative Commons movement, Lawrence Lessig. A bit less known is the fact that due to the way I created the translations, using docbook and po4a, I also recreated the English original. And because I already had created a new the PDF edition, I published it too. The revenue from the books are sent to the Creative Commons Corporation. In other words, I do not earn any money from this project, I just earn the warm fuzzy feeling that the text is available for a wider audience and more people can learn why the Creative Commons is needed.

  • Graph Databases for Beginners: Graph Search Algorithm Basics

    As has been illustrated above, graph search algorithms are helpful in traversing a set of graph data and providing relevant information. However, they also have their limitations. We have seen that there are many varieties of search algorithms, ranging from the more basic breadth-first and depth-first to uninformed and informed searches to the Dijkstra’s and A* algorithms. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses, and no one type is better than another.

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TuxMachines: Openwashing

Saturday 6th of August 2016 06:01:45 PM

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TuxMachines: Web-based Development

Saturday 6th of August 2016 05:58:37 PM
  • Moving to GitLab! Yes, it's worth it!

    I started evangelizing Git in 2007. It was a very tough sell to make at the time.

    Outside of the kernel development almost no one wanted to learn it and we had very worthy competitors, from Subversion, to Mercurial, to Bazaar, to Darcs, to Perforce, and so on. But those of use that dug deeper knew that Git had the edge and it was a matter of time.

    Then GitHub showed up in 2008 and the rest is history. For many years it was just "cool" to be in GitHub. The Ruby community drove GitHub up into the sky. Finally it became the status quo and the one real monopoly in information repositories - not just software source code, but everything.

    I always knew that we should have a "local" option, which is why I tried to contribute to Gitorious way back in 2009. Other options arose, but eventually GitLab appeared around 2011 and picked up steam in the last couple of years.

  • PHP 7.1 Beta 2 Released

    The second beta of the upcoming PHP 7.1 major release is now available for testing.

    The PHP 7.1.0 Beta 2 release has core fixes, various calendar / cURL / GD / PCRE / SPL / Streams fixes, and a variety of other bug fixes.

  • PHP 7.1.0 Beta 2 Released

    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0 Beta 2. This release is the second beta for 7.1.0. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system.

  • New attack steals SSNs, e-mail addresses, and more from HTTPS pages

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TuxMachines: Creating a real GNU/Linux phone os

Saturday 6th of August 2016 05:45:58 PM

I just want Linux on my phone. I love Android, it has a decent app ecosystem. I like the idea of Ubuntu Touch but I absolutely don't like the design guidelines. The problem is that both operating systems are missing the things from Linux I like. Technically they both run on a version of the Linux kernel but what I want is the GNU userland, Xorg/Wayland, the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, and my own choice of desktop environment or window manager.

I know quite a lot programming languages enough to make some applications, I dont want to learn 3 new ones for 3 mobile platforms. I don't want to write my app in javascript, java or swift.

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TuxMachines: Security News

Saturday 6th of August 2016 05:31:44 PM
  • Friday's security updates
  • How to Hack an Election in 7 Minute

    When Princeton professor Andrew Appel decided to hack into a voting machine, he didn’t try to mimic the Russian attackers who hacked into the Democratic National Committee's database last month. He didn’t write malicious code, or linger near a polling place where the machines can go unguarded for days.

  • Apache OpenOffice and CVE-2016-1513

    The Apache OpenOffice (AOO) project has suffered from a lack of developers for some time now; releases are infrequent and development of new features is relatively slow. But a recent security advisory for CVE-2016-1513 is rather eye-opening in that it further shows that the project is in rough shape. Announcing a potential code execution vulnerability without quickly providing a new release of AOO may be putting users of the tool at more risk than they realize.

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TuxMachines: Android Leftovers

Saturday 6th of August 2016 05:28:45 PM

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LXer: How to move VirtualBox VMs from one drive to another

Saturday 6th of August 2016 05:08:24 PM
How many times have you been in a situation where the drive housing your VirtualBox virtual machines ran out of space? Or maybe you were simply migrating from one server or drive to another? When that happened, you may have discovered that VirtualBox doesn't have a built-in tool to help you move those VMs. It is, however, possible...albeit a bit convoluted.

Reddit: ELI5: what's Lets Encrypt ?

Saturday 6th of August 2016 04:33:16 PM

As in title, what's it all about ?

submitted by /u/zigglezip
[link] [comments]

Phoronix: 4-Disk Btrfs RAID Benchmarks On Linux 4.7

Saturday 6th of August 2016 03:16:02 PM
Going along with the recent Linux 4.7 file-system benchmarks, here are some tests of Btrfs' built-in RAID functionality when tested on the Linux 4.7 kernel across four SATA SSDs.

LXer: Raspberry Pi Zero sized HAT has four sensors with 10 variables

Saturday 6th of August 2016 03:14:02 PM
Pimeroni’s Enviro pHAT is a $20 Raspberry Pi HAT add-on that provides sensors including temperature/pressure, light/color, motion, and ADC. The Enviro pHAT, available at Pimeroni in the UK and Adafruit in the US, is a Raspberry Pi HAT (Hardware Attached on Top) add-on with four multipurpose sensors that provide up to 10 different sensor variables. […]

TuxMachines: Wine and CrossOver

Saturday 6th of August 2016 03:10:41 PM
  • Run Your Favorite Windows Apps and Games on Mac with CrossOver 15

    CrossOver 15 for Mac and Linux helps you run your favorite Windows games and apps on OS X and Linux computers. No more dual booting, no purchasing of Windows license, nada. Simply invest $19.99, get today’s awesome deal and use CrossOver 15 to run any and all of your favorite Windows games right on your Macs. Of course, this means one click installation and native speeds when you run Windows applications. Who could say no to such an awesome offer, especially if you have a long list of Windows apps and games that you would want to use on your Mac and Linux systems. Head over to WCCFtech Deals for more details about today’s featured deal.

  • Wine 1.9.16 Brings Further Direct3D CS Improvements

    Wine 1.9.16 is now available as the latest bi-weekly release of Wine for running Windows programs on Linux and other operating systems.

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TuxMachines: LibreOffice and OpenOffice Reviews

Saturday 6th of August 2016 03:02:51 PM
  • Review: LibreOffice 5.2 — solid, unpolished alternative

    LibreOffice is an office suite that rivals Microsoft Office yet costs nothing. There are versions for Windows, OS X and Linux along with a portable edition that works from a USB drive.

    If you’re on a tight budget and have a Windows PC, LibreOffice is by far the best alternative to Office. It is more complete than Google Apps and leaves Apache OpenOffice for dead.

    OS X users have a good alternative free option. Apple’s iWorks suite is free with new Macs. Even so, you might prefer LibreOffice because it has better Microsoft Office compatibility.

    LibreOffice looks and feels more like Microsoft Office than iWorks. If you know Microsoft Office, moving to LibreOffice will be less of a wrench. It also includes a database unlike either the OS X version of Microsoft Office or iWorks. If you need a simple database and have no budget, LibreOffice would be ideal.

    Some Linux distributions include LibreOffice either as standard or as an optional download. It’s a more straightforward choice than using a tool like Wine to run Microsoft Office.

  • Apache OpenOffice 4.1.2 Review

    Every computer needs applications to do any work, and that means more money. Except for open-source software, like OpenOffice, which is free. In the case of OpenOffice, the free software looks and acts like Microsoft Office circa 2003, and includes a word processor, spreadsheet and presentation creator. Not only does OpenOffice look and feel like Office, but it also reads and writes Office files so well that most users could exchange files between the two suites and no one would know the difference.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers/Networks

  • Rackspace to be Acquired for $4.3B
    Rackspace announced that it is being acquired in an all-cash deal valued at $4.3B. Pending regulatory anti-trust approval, the firm will be taken private by a group of investors led by Apollo Global Management in Q4 of 2016. This valuation equates to a price of $32/share. The 38% premium cited in the announcement is calculated against a base share price from August 3, as the news about the pending acquisition began increasing the company stock price as early as August 4. For historical context, this valuation falls considerably below the company’s peak market capitalization in January 2013 when Rackspace was worth $10.9B. This means that the company’s current valuation – including the premium – is less than 40% of what it was at its highest point.
  • More on Open Source Tools for Data Science
    Open source tools are having a transformative impact on the world of data science. In a recent guest post here on OStatic, Databricks' Kavitha Mariappan (shown here), who is Vice President of Marketing, discussed some of the most powerful open source solutions for use in the data science arena. Databricks was founded by the creators of the popular open source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, which is itself transforming data science. Here are some other open source tools in this arena to know about. As Mariappan wrote: "Apache Spark, a project of the Apache Software Foundation, is an open source platform for distributed in-memory data processing. Spark supports complete data science pipelines with libraries that run on the Spark engine, including Spark SQL, Spark Streaming, Spark MLlib and GraphX. Spark SQL supports operations with structured data, such as queries, filters, joins, and selects. In Spark 2.0, released in July 2016, Spark SQL comprehensively supports the SQL 2003 standard, so users with experience working with SQL on relational databases can learn how to work with Spark quickly."
  • SDN, open source nexus to accelerate service creation
    What's new in the SDN blog world? One expert says SDN advancements will be accelerated, thanks to SDN and open source convergence, while another points out the influence SDN has in the cloud industry.
  • Platform9 & ZeroStack Make OpenStack a Little More VMware-Friendly
    Platform9 and ZeroStack are adding VMware high availability to their prefab cloud offerings, part of the ongoing effort to make OpenStack better accepted by enterprises. OpenStack is a platform, an archipelago of open source projects that help you run a cloud. But some assembly is required. Both Platform9 and ZeroStack are operating on the theory that OpenStack will better succeed if it’s turned into more of a shrink-wrapped product.
  • Putting Ops Back in DevOps
    What Agile means to your typical operations staff member is, “More junk coming faster that I will get blamed for when it breaks.” There always is tension between development and operations when something goes south. Developers are sure the code worked on their machine; therefore, if it does not work in some other environment, operations must have changed something that made it break. Operations sees the same code perform differently on the same machine with the same config, which means if something broke, the most recent change must have caused it … i.e. the code did it. The finger-pointing squabbles are epic (no pun intended). So how do we get Ops folks interested in DevOps without promising them only a quantum order of magnitude more problems—and delivered faster?
  • Cloud chronicles
    How open-source software and cloud computing have set up the IT industry for a once-in-a-generation battle

KDE and Qt

GNOME News

  • Fresh From the Oven: GNOME Pie 0.6.9 Released
    For a slice of something this weekend you might want to check out the latest update to GNOME Pie, the circular app launcher for Linux desktops.
  • GUADEC 2016 and the Butterfly Effect
  • GUADEC 2016 Notes
    I’m back from GUADEC and wanted to share a few thoughts on the conference itself and the post-conference hackfest days. All the talks including the opening and closing sessions and the GNOME Foundation AGM are available online. Big thanks goes to the organization team for making this possible.

Security News

  • Thursday's security updates
  • Priorities in security
  • How Core Infrastructure Initiative Aims to Secure the Internet
    In the aftermath of the Heartbleed vulnerability's emergence in 2014, the Linux Foundation created the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII)to help prevent that type of issue from recurring. Two years later, the Linux Foundation has tasked its newly minted CTO, Nicko van Someren, to help lead the effort and push it forward. CII has multiple efforts under way already to help improve open-source security. Those efforts include directly funding developers to work on security, a badging program that promotes security practices and an audit of code to help identify vulnerable code bases that might need help. In a video interview with eWEEKat the LinuxCon conference here, Van Someren detailed why he joined the Linux Foundation and what he hopes to achieve.
  • Certificate Authority Gave Out Certs For GitHub To Someone Who Just Had A GitHub Account
    For many years now, we've talked about the many different problems today's web security system has based on the model of security certificates issued by Certificate Authorities. All you need is a bad Certificate Authority be trusted and a lot of bad stuff can happen. And it appears we've got yet another example. A message on Mozilla's security policy mailing list notes that a free certificate authority named WoSign appeared to be doing some pretty bad stuff, including handing out certificates for a base domain if someone merely had control over a subdomain. This was discovered by accident, but then tested on GitHub... and it worked.