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Updated: 30 min 36 sec ago

LXer: Bookworm: A Simple yet Magnificent eBook Reader for Linux

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 07:49:09 AM
If you are looking for an effective eBook reader for Linux, Bookworm will serve your purpose. Bookworm is an open source eBook reader with an easy and simple layout supporting different file formats like epub, pdf, mobi, cbr and cbz. Supporting cbr and cbz files mean that you can also use it for reading comics on Linux.

TuxMachines: 8-Way Linux Distribution Comparison On A Dual Xeon Scalable Gold Server

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 07:30:05 AM

While we routinely run various Linux distribution / operating system comparisons at Phoronix, they tend to be done on desktop class hardware and the occasional servers. This is our look at the most interesting enterprise-focused Linux distribution comparison to date as we see how Intel's Xeon Scalable platform compares on different GNU/Linux distributions when using the Tyan GT24E-B7106 paired with two Dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors. The tested configuration has 96GB of DDR4-2666 memory and 40 cores / 80 threads to see how different modern Linux distributions are affected with the latest-generation Xeon platform.

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LXer: ATOM FOR JAVASCRIPT DEVELOPERS

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 06:29:05 AM
Atom is slow, lag and it’s as resource-intensive as Google Chrome. However, when you code JavaScript, I must admit that using Atom is super cool ! In this article I will show you how I manage Atom to be effective when developing fullstack JavaScript web applications.

LXer: Tiny, rugged, open-spec SBC plugs into carrier or breadboards

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 05:09:02 AM
FriendlyElec’s WiFi-ready, $8 “NanoPi Duo” runs Linux on a quad -A7 Allwinner H2+, and can plug into a $10 RPi-like carrier or any standard breadboard. FriendlyElec has added to its line of open spec, community backed NanoPi SBCs with an IoT-focused, $8 NanoPi Duo SBC that can plug into a $10 “Mini Shield” carrier board […]

Phoronix: LLVM 5.0 Release Should Be Imminent

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 05:07:06 AM
LLVM 5.0 was supposed to be officially released last week, but instead another release candidate was warranted while the stable debut is expected in the days ahead...

LXer: The next release of OpenStack, Pike leaps up

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 03:48:59 AM
OpenStack[he]#039[/he]s latest release is easier to update than ever.

Reddit: I need linux. What should I do here?

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:46:40 AM

I run a dual booted laptop (W10/Ubuntu) which I take to college, work and anywhere that needs coding or basic usability. I do half of my coding projects on Linux & the other half on Windows. I just recently built a gaming PC which stays at home. However, I do want to use it for coding and work on my Linux-based projects for school. I don't really know if I should dual boot it, but I could use Virtual Box. What is your guys' opinions?

submitted by /u/allidoisace
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LXer: MongoDB quits Solaris, wants to work on an OS people actually use

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:28:55 AM
Says users are migrating away, criticizes Oracle's roadmap and ends builds and support, effective ASAPMongoDB has killed off its Solaris development efforts. The company's director of platform engineering Andrew Morrow calls the decision “bittersweet,” but says “lack of adoption among our user base” made the decision easy and necessary.…

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:17:02 AM
  • Distributed Systems Are Hard

    A lot of the traditional mechanisms for recovering from failure may make things worse in a distributed environment. Brute force retries may flood your network, restores from backups are not straightforward. There are design patterns for addressing all of these issues but they require thought and testing.

    If there were no errors, distributed systems would be pretty easy. That can lull optimists into a false sense of security. Distributed systems must be designed to be resilient by accepting that all possible errors are just business as usual.

  • Run your Xen VMs on the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

    While SLES does offer a specific installation pattern to make a server a Xen host, it's mainly a DYI configuration, where the installation is like any other Linux installation. There is, for instance, no notion of a storage pool easily connected to external storage; the administrator who uses all default choices ends up with locally stored VM images.

  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter & The Future of The Universe

    About 3 months ago, we launched a new version of elementary OS and a new service that we call AppCenter Dashboard. In that time, we’ve helped developers publish nearly 40 new apps.

  • Asus Tinker Board – TinkerOS_Debian V2.0.1 (Beta version)

    The Asus Tinker Board seeks to offer a good user experience for two different types of users, catering for both Linux and Android enthusiasts. While the latest Android release is no longer labelled a beta release, it still has some serious omissions. In particular, the lack of Google Play Store and a normal Android upgrade path. But on balance, I’m satisfied that Asus has met their objective of offering an attractive user experience for Android users. What about Linux users?

  • Tizen Experts Weekly News Recap – 27th Aug
  • OSNEXUS and Pogo Linux Announce Hybrid Cloud Storage Solution for Microsoft Azure

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TuxMachines: Graphics: Vulkan and Cairo

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:16:10 AM
  • Vulkan-CPU Is Off To A Good Start Thanks To GSoC 2017

    Google Summer of Code participant Jacob Lifshay has written his final recap about the work he did this summer on starting the "Vulkan-CPU" project for writing a soft/CPU-based implementation of the Vulkan API.

    As we've been covering throughout the summer, he's hit milestones like SPIR-V to LLVM IR translation, initial graphics pipeline setup, and the start of vertex shader support.

  • Cairo 1.15.8 Released With Support For Colored Emoji

    It has been a few months since the last Cairo 2D graphics library update, which is used by programs ranging from Firefox to GTK and WebKit, but today the notable 1.15.8 release is now available.

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TuxMachines: Software: Bookworm, Allo, Selene Media Converter, and Falkon

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:14:07 AM
  • Bookworm: A Simple yet Magnificent eBook Reader for Linux

    Bookworm is an open source eBook reader with an easy and simple layout supporting different file formats like epub, pdf, mobi, cbr and cbz. Supporting cbr and cbz files mean that you can also use it for reading comics on Linux.

  • Unofficial Open-Source Allo Desktop Client Bypasses Chrome

    There is a brand new open-source native desktop client for Google’s Allo that solves at least one of the problems users might have with the web application. Namely, it bypasses the Allo for Web app’s reliance on Google’s Chrome browser which has been a problem for some users since the official web client was first released. Allo for Desktop may solve that problem, though it’s not affiliated with Google in any way, meaning there is some risk associated with installing it. Nonetheless, the source code itself has also been made available on GitHub, making the solution relatively transparent.

  • Looking For Media Converter Then Give A Try To Selene Media Converter

    There are various multimedia converters available for Linux, there is no harm to try new application, well this application is not new and been around from quite sometime. Selene media converter lets you convert audio and video files, this software is an ultimate multimedia converting tool, that can solve virtually all your video/audio converting needs. It supports almost every file format that you are likely to come across and can encode them to popular output formats like WAV/MP3/AAC/FLAC/OPUS/MP4/MKV/OGG/OGV/WEBM etc. It aims to provide a simple GUI for converting files to popular formats along with powerful command-line options for automated/unattended encoding.

  • That was quick: Falkon web browser is now available as a Snap app

    The newly-named Falkon web browser is now available for testing on Ubuntu and KDE Neon.

    KDE Neon is adopting Snap packages as its containerised packaging format of choice (sorry Flatpak fans) and with Falkon now under the auspices of KDE its arrival as a Snap app was always a matter of when and not if.

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TuxMachines: GNOME: GNOME Tweaks, GNOME Pie, GNOME Shell Search

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:11:25 AM
  • Gnome Pie – A Circular Application Launcher (Menu) for Linux

    You know about Dash to Dock and Dash to Panel. But do you know about Gnome Pie? It’s a completely different concept from the app launchers typical of Windows, Mac, and Linux systems because it implements an idea known as “Fitts’ law”.

  • GNOME Tweaks 3.25.91

    The GNOME 3.26 release cycle is in its final bugfix stage before release.

    Here’s a look at what’s new in GNOME Tweaks since my last post.

    I’ve heard people say that GNOME likes to remove stuff. If that were true, how would there be anything left in GNOME? But maybe it’s partially true. And maybe it’s possible for removals to be a good thing?

  • These Pictures Show How GNOME Shell Search Is Improving

    GNOME 3.26 improves the appearance of GNOME Shell search results, making better use of screen space to show more results on screen.

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TuxMachines: Red Hat and Fedora: Intermountain Healthcare, Narendra Gupta as Chairman and More

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:09:25 AM
  • How a leader can move forward without consensus
  • Intermountain begins shift to open IT platform

    Salt Lake City-based Intermountain Healthcare has begun the work of replacing its proprietary platform to an open one. The goal is to create a modern IT environment across the 22-hospital systems, which also includes 180 clinics and 1,500 physicians.

    Intermountain is using Red Hat platforms to transform its existing infrastructure by replacing legacy tools and migrating services from a proprietary platform to an open source Red Hat stack.

  • Red Hat (RHT) Names Narendra Gupta as Chairman
  • Red Hat Appoints Narendra Gupta as New Chairman of the Board [Ed: as above]

    Gupta co-founded Integrated Systems Inc. (ISI) in 1980 to develop products for embedded software development. He served as ISI’s president and CEO from founding until 1994 and as chairman until 2000 when ISI merged with Wind River Systems, Inc., a provider of device software optimization solutions. Gupta served as Wind River's vice chairman from 2000 until its acquisition by Intel in 2009. He currently serves on the board of trustees of the California Institute of Technology, the advisory board of Asia Society Northern California, and on the boards of several privately held companies.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) stock market shares of $105.59
  • GSoC: Final Report

    This is the final report of my work on Google Summer of Code program. My name is David Carlos and I am a Brazilian software engineering student, at University of Brasilia. I already work as programmer, and really love what I do for a living. When I am not working I am with my family and friends, enjoying good beer and listening to the best Brazilian music style, Samba.

    [...]

    Static analyzers are computer programs that analyze other computer programs. This is generally done by checking source code through static analysis methods. This is a good means to support software assurance, since static analysis can in theory enumerate all possible interactions in a program, having the potential to find rare occurrences that would be harder to find with automated testing.

    kiskadee is a system designed to support continuous static analysis in software repositories using different static analyzers and to store this information in a database. Based on such database information, kiskadee will rank warnings reported by the different static analyzers, where warnings with the highest rank are more likely to indicate real and more critical software flaws, while warnings with the lowest rank are more likely to be false positives. In this context, a warning is a single issue produced by a static analyzer. Finally, kiskadee maps software flaws inserted in specific software versions, providing developers with a relatively small list of warnings to be investigated in a suggested order.

  • Fedora 26 - the MuseScore software.

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TuxMachines: Firefox Using Client Side Decoration, AdNauseam Blocked

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:06:54 AM
  • Firefox Using Client Side Decoration (Video)

    If you’ve been longing to see some progress on Firefox GTK header bar support you’re going to want to feast your eyes on this.

    Alex of WOGUE fame has posted a new video to showcase Firefox CSD as it looks and works right now.

    Now, he had to build (painfully, I hear) >from Git to try this out, but his video shows “all upstream work from Mozillians [and] no patches!”.

  • AdNauseam extension blocked

    Since proponents of this extension will likely be unhappy or have questions as to why, and likely want to be vocal about this addition:

    After investigating the AdNauseam extension's behavior and the results for web publishers, the extension has been added to the Pale Moon blocklist with a severity level of 2 (meaning you won't be able to enable it unless you increase the blocking level in about:config to 3). For those unfamiliar with this extension: it generates false ad "clicks" to ad servers in an attempt to generate "noise" for the ad networks in a protest against the advertising network system as a whole.
    While the premise behind this is similar to poisoning trackers with false fingerprints (which we are proponents of, ourselves), and we normally let users decide for themselves what they want to do with their browser, we are strictly against allowing extensions that cause direct damage (including damage to third parties). There is a subtle but important difference between blocking content and generating fake user interaction.

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TuxMachines: OSS Leftovers

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:05:50 AM
  • IBM in Blockchain Collaboration for Food Safety

    Another new use has been found for blockchain. Last week, IBM announced that it's collaborating with a group of 10 major food suppliers "to identify new areas where the global supply chain can benefit from blockchain." It appears that initially the focus will be on tracking food products as they move their way from farm to processing facilities to grocery store shelves. The deal includes Dole, Driscoll’s, Golden State Foods, Kroger, McCormick and Company, McLane Company, Nestlé, Tyson Foods, Unilever and Walmart.

  • Eurovision, Matrox, Telvue join open source alliance

    The SRT Alliance, an open-source initiative dedicated to overcoming the challenges of low-latency video streaming, announces that 14 new members have joined the initiative including Eurovision Media Services, Matrox and Telvue.

    Now with more than 35 members, the SRT Alliance’s rapid growth supports continued adoption and development of the low latency SRT open source video transport protocol across a variety of industries. Founded by Haivision and Wowza, the SRT Alliance is focused on developing SRT to be an alternative to proprietary and expensive transmission protocols by offering an open source solution that can deliver low-latency video with greater reliability and performance in sub-optimal networks.

  • Rocket.Chat Extends Support to Open Source Initiative and Community

    The Open Source Initiative (OSI), the founding organization of the open source software movement, announced Rocket.Chat has joined the global non-profit as a Premium Corporate Sponsor. Rocket.Chat joins Craigslist Foundation, Facebook, Github, Google, Heptio, HPE, IBM, USB Direct, and many more sponsors, supporters and members committed to increasing awareness of open source software, and participation within the innovative communities that enable its continued advancement.

  • The next release of OpenStack, Pike leaps up

    Whatever else has ever been said about OpenStack, no one has ever said the open-source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud was easy to deploy or update. With the release of Pike, the 16th version of OpenStack, that's changing.

    Pike, and the two updates, Queens and Rocky, to follow it, won't bring major new features or changes. Instead, each will build on the Ocata release. Ocata, too, was focused on improving stability, scalability, and performance of the core services.

  • What Do the Most Successful Open Source Projects Have In Common?

    Thriving open source projects have many users, and the most active have thousands of authors contributing. There are now more than 60 million open source repositories, but the vast majority are just a public workspace for a single individual. What differentiates the most successful open source projects? One commonality is that most of them are backed by either one company or a group of companies collaborating together

  • Leadership lessons from open source software

    As chief information officer, I leverage many of the lessons I learned from maintaining or contributing to open source software. While I find insights from other areas, experience drives learning, and my twenty years of personal experience in open source software has taught me much about accepting feedback, listening to others, and sharing the burden. This applies directly to my professional career.

  • The Importance of Choosing the Correct Mastodon Instance

    Remember, Mastodon is a new decentralized social network, based on a free software which is rapidly gaining users (already there is more than 1.5 million accounts). As I’ve created my account in June, I was a fast addict and I’ve already created several tools for this network, Feed2toot, Remindr and Boost (mostly written in Python).

    Now, with all this experience I have to stress out the importance of choosing the correct Mastodon instance.

    [...]

    As a social network, Mastodon is truly decentralized, with more than 1.5 million users on more than 2350 existing instances. As such, the most common usage is to create an account on an open instance. To create its own instance is way too difficult for the average user. Yet, using an open instance creates a strong dependence on the technical administrator of the chosen instance.

  • How open source analytics can boost your cybersecurity arsenal

    Data growth never stops and the sheer volume and variety of this data has challenged organizations to makes sense of it all. Over the last few years, these groups have been turning to big data solutions to extract valuable insights and actionable intelligence from these massive new sets of data. Now organizations are beginning to leverage this same technology to modernize and reinforce their cybersecurity posture.

  • Digital-O-Mat: Compare your views on Internet policies with the parties for the German federal election 2017

    CDU/CSU (conservatives) and FDP (liberals) marked their position as "neutral" and answered in a very similar fashion. Unfortunately, these parties avoid making a clear stance and ultimately confirm the status quo. On one hand, they do consider the use of Free Software, on the other hand, so they say, there are multiple other aspects to consider weigh in. However, they list functionality and usability for example, even though they have no relation to the licence in use. When asked about the migration of existing IT systems, CDU/CSU prefer decision making on a case-by-case basis, while FDP dodged our question.

    Although the SPD (labour) also marked their answer as "neutral", they support the deployment and development of Free Software in public administrations and educational institutions, "to foster the creation of innovative businesses in the local market". Die Linke (lefts) and Bündnis 90/Die Grünen (greens) position themselves as supporters of deployment and public funding of Free Software. The greens consider Free Software to be a "cornerstone for secure and future-proof IT systems", and the lefts also fully support it, as long as there are no concerns regarding security or operation.

  • Putting German Politicians On The Record

    In Canada, there seems to be only one party on the record as favouring FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software), but the other parties don’t even have a position… Too bad. Now that I’m determined to use renewable energy and drive an electric car, I may be in the mood to change my vote next election over one last issue.

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TuxMachines: Open Hardware: TinyCircuits, Numworks, and Open Source FPGAs

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:02:59 AM
  • TinyCircuits Portfolio of Tiny Open Source Electronics Available Globally from Digi-Key

    TinyCircuits' selection of small-size open source electronics, including the TinyDuino, is available for immediate shipment worldwide through Digi-Key Electronics, a global electronic components distributor, thanks to a new distribution agreement between the two companies.

  • Numworks graphing calculator is made for students raised on tech

    Now, an open-source calculator called Numworks is taking them on with a clean, simple look, an intuitive interface and open source programming and design.

  • Retrocomputing With Open Source FPGAs

    A few years ago, we saw the reverse engineering of the Lattice iCE40 bitstream, opening the door to a completely Open Source development tool chain for FPGAs. This was an astonishing amount of work from [Clifford Wolf], [Mathias Lasser], and [Cotton Seed], but since then we haven’t seen a whole lot from Project IceStorm. Now, that’s about to change, and in the coolest way possible. [hoglet] is retrocomputing on an ICE40 development board.

    This is an implementation of the Acorn Atom on a myStorm BlackIce board. This board is basically just a Lattice iCE40 FPGA, a few support components, and a bunch of pin headers, some of which are in the not-so-handy Arduino pinout footprint. By porting some Acorn Atom implementations and a 6502 core to verilog, [hoglet] was able to stuff a cool old retrocomputer onto an Open Source FPGA development board. Video output is through a resistor DAC driving a VGA cable, and keyboard input is through PS/2.

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TuxMachines: Go, 'First' Programming Languages, and "Flang" Compiler

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 02:01:30 AM
  • My use-case for Go

    After using a few very good applications written in Go (Syncthing, Docker and Hugo are some examples) I wanted to get to learn a bit more about the language.

    I'm very interested in programming languages theory and how it could give developers the tools they need to write software in the best possible way and with as many guarantees as possible on the correctness of the resulting applications.

    To get an idea of where programming languages theory is headed have a look at the post Graydon Hoare (the creator of Rust and now one of Swift's developers) published discussing possible new research directions for programming languages.

  • What was your first programming language?

    Whether you first learned to program in a classroom setting, on the job, or by teaching yourself, everyone who has contributed code to an open source project has a story of how they first picked up programming. And no matter if you still use it today, your first language played an important role in shaping your understanding of computer systems.

  • NVIDIA & Co Continue Working On LLVM Fortran "Flang" Compiler

    Since earlier this year NVIDIA posted their work on "Flang", an LLVM-based Fortran compiler, to GitHub while now they have done a formal announcement and update about its status.

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TuxMachines: Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds, IoT Applications

Wednesday 30th of August 2017 01:57:56 AM

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More in Tux Machines

5 fundamental differences between Windows 10 and Linux

This comparison really only scratches the surface. And don't get me wrong, there are areas where Windows 10 bests Linux (few, but they do exist). In the end, however, the choice is yours. Chances are you'll be making the choice based on which platform will allow you get more work done and do so with a certain level of efficiency and reliability. I would highly recommend, to anyone, if Linux can enable you to get your work done...give it a go and see if you don't find it more dependable and predictable. Read more

Firefly COM dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. Read more

Games: Morphite, Mooseman, Arma, and PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller

  • Stylish FPS 'Morphite' released without Linux support, but it's coming
    Sadly, Morphite [Steam] has seen a delay with the Linux version. Thankfully, the developer was quick to respond and it's still coming.
  • The Mooseman, a short side-scrolling adventure just released for Linux
    In the mood for something a little out there? Well, The Mooseman [Steam] a short side-scroller might just hit the spot.
  • Arma 3 1.76 for Linux is planned, work on it to start "soon"
    Bohemia Interactive have announced in their latest "SITREP" that the Linux version of Arma 3 will be updated to the latest version of 1.76, work is set to start on it "soon".
  • Sony's PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller Now Supported in Fedora Linux, GNOME
    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. The patches submitted by the developer to the Bluetooth packages in the latest Fedora Linux release promise to bring improvements to the way PlayStation 3 DualShock controllers are set up in the environment if you're using the GNOME desktop environment. Until now, to set up a DualShock 3 controller, users had to plug it in via USB, then disconnect it, and then press the "P" button on the joypad, which would have popped-up a dialog to confirm the Bluetooth connection. But this method had some quirks though.

Debian Development Reports

  • Free software log (July and August 2017)
    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years. After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125
    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.