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Updated: 1 hour 19 min ago

TuxMachines: New Version of GParted

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 03:35:15 PM

Life on Linux has been much less stressful. The modern filesystems have made endless defragging a thing of the past for me, and partitioning is much simpler too. There are many options when it comes to disk maintenance, but GParted is one of my favorites. I use it on all my machines.

GParted is a nice tool for managing disk partitions in Linux. It's very powerful, but the interface is simplicity itself. The live version is OS-independent. You can use it on most computers that can boot from a USB drive or CD—just plug the USB or CD in to the machine and reboot. Instead of loading the operating system, you get GParted, all by itself.

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Phoronix: Early Open-Source Linux Benchmarks Of The AMD Radeon RX 470

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 03:29:46 PM
With my Radeon RX 470 retail unit finally having arrived yesterday, I've been running many benchmarks of this graphics card compared to other AMD and NVIDIA graphics cards under Linux. For your viewing pleasure today is the very tip of the iceberg of many RX 460 and RX 470 Linux benchmarks to be published on Phoronix over the days to come.

TuxMachines: Open vSwitch (OVS) Becomes a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 03:25:10 PM

The Open vSwitch (OVS) open-source networking effort is officially joining the Linux Foundation's Collaborative Project roster today. While OVS is new as a Linux Foundation project, it's no stranger to Linux. OVS first became part of Linux in 2012 with the debut of the Linux 3.3 kernel release.

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TuxMachines: Build a $20 Computer with PINE64

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 03:23:18 PM

I love my Raspberry Pi, which I use for many different projects. But when I saw Kickstarter campaign for 64-bit PINE64 I could not resist, so I pre-ordered one for myself.

I wanted to play with the board and see whether I could do some home automation kind of stuff or make my Traxxas X-maxx smart. There are three editions of PINE64: 512MB, 1GB, and 2GB RAM, and I ordered the 512MB version.

The PINE64 is almost twice as big as the Raspberry Pi 2 (Figure 1), so it’s not as compact as I expected. Still, it’s a good size for a whole range of projects.

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Reddit: Easy Way To Copy Files Over SSH

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 02:11:06 PM

Reddit: Kernel update; worth it?

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 02:00:30 PM

My work laptop is on 3.13.0-37-generic kernel. Is there any big reason(s) for me to move to 4.4?

submitted by /u/TobiasBlueMe
[link] [comments]

LXer: Emmabuntus Debian Edition 1.0: the new story begins

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 01:39:10 PM
Emmabuntus Debian Edition is a nice distribution that works for the particular niche. It delivers Linux and computer enablement into remote areas of the world where computers are rare and Internet connection could be something exotic.However, there are some more issues mentioned above that could be solved if the team looked into the distribution polishing a bit more.

LinuxToday: Open vSwitch (OVS) Becomes a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 01:19:00 PM

EnterpriseNetworkingPlanet: Four years after becoming part of the mainstream Linux kernel, virtual switch effort opens up further.

Phoronix: Open-Source AMD Polaris Audio Support Isn't Coming Until DAL Lands

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 01:14:31 PM
Just as a quick word of warning, the open-source AMD Linux driver stack won't be supporting HDMI/DP audio with the new Radeon RX 460/470/480 "Polaris" graphics cards until its massive DAL code-base is merged...

Linux.com: Build a $20 Computer with PINE64

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 01:00:57 PM

I love my Raspberry Pi, which I use for many different projects. But when I saw Kickstarter campaign for 64-bit PINE64 I could not resist, so I pre-ordered one for myself.

TuxMachines: Development News (Vim, Programming Language, and ELLCC Release)

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 12:49:29 PM
  • 7 reasons to love Vim

    When I started using the vi text editor, I hated it. I thought it was the most painful and counter-intuitive editor ever designed. But I'd decided I had to learn the thing, because if you're using Unix, vi was everywhere and was the only editor you were guaranteed to have access to. That was back in 1998, but it remains true today—vi is available, usually as part of the base install, on almost every Linux distribution in existence.

    It took about a month before I could do anything with any proficiency in vi and I still didn't love it, but by then I'd realized that there was an insanely powerful editor hiding behind this bizarre facade. So I stuck with it, and eventually found out that once you know what you're doing, it's an incredibly fast editor.

  • devRant Releases The Most Annoying Programming Languages List — Which One Do You Use?

    devRant, an online community for developers, has released its data, revealing the most annoying programming languages. The developers with SQL in their profile skills rant +56.0 percent more than the average rate. On the contrary, Objective-C developers are the most content

  • ELLCC 0.1.32 Embedded Cross-Compiler Released
  • ELLCC 0.1.32 Released

    A new binary release of the ELLCC cross compilation tool chain is available. ELLCC is a pre-packaged set of tools designed to support cross compilation for a variety of target processors.

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Reddit: Is there a way for me to completely remove the login screen on boot up ?

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 12:45:54 PM

I have a wireless keyboard therefore I can't login to Kali when I turn on my raspberry pi.. I bought a wired keyboard but I'm using Kali on my TV so its a little awkward to use. Is there a way for me to completely remove the login screen? Or to somehow connect my wireless keyboard before logging in?

submitted by /u/TheAngryFox
[link] [comments]

LXer: 7 reasons to love Vim

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 12:30:33 PM
When I started using the vi text editor, I hated it. I thought it was the most painful and counter-intuitive editor ever designed. But I'd decided I had to learn the thing, because if you're using Unix, vi was everywhere and was the only editor you were guaranteed to have access to. That was back in 1998, but it remains true today—vi is available, usually as part of the base install, on almost every Linux distribution in existence.read more

TuxMachines: More Fun with Windows 10, Yabba Dabba Do Bedrock Linux

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 12:14:01 PM

Windows 10 is back in the news and back up to their old tricks. The latest Windows 10 updates has been reported to delete Linux partitions without confirmation or even warning. Even pure Windows users have reported unbootable systems and Linux is the bad guy in a security question with Linux on Windows. Elsewhere, Lumina Desktop Environment hit milestone version 1.0.0 today and Linux Mint had an oopsy with their Firefox 48 update. New Bedrock Linux introduced a different approach to universal packaging and Christine Hall shared her top five favorite Linux distributions.

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TuxMachines: Fedora News (Fedora 25, Flock)

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 12:12:00 PM
  • Fedora 25 Alpha Freeze Goes Into Effect, Still Eyeing November Release

    Today marks the Fedora 25 Alpha release that also means it's time for the software string freeze and Bodhi activation point. If all goes well, Fedora 25 will be released three months from yesterday.

    The various freezes are beginning to take place for Fedora 25 so it can hopefully be on target for its release on 8 November. Details on the various milestones hit today can be found via this mailing list post.

  • Flock 2016 & my talk on ABI checking in Fedora

    Flock is the annual Fedora conference where you can find Fedora contributors as the main audience. This year the conference was held at the beautiful city Kraków, Poland from 2nd to 5th August. Being a schedule of 4 days, it was split into first 2 days of talks and later on workshops. Majority of talks were enriched with various Fedora related topics.

  • FAD and Flock to Fedora 2016

    Brace yourselves, this is going to be a long one! In the past 2 weeks I’ve been traveling a lot: first to Westford, US for Design Team Fedora Activity Days 2016 and then to Krakow, Poland for Flock to Fedora 2016.

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TuxMachines: Security News

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 12:00:52 PM
  • Computers That Don't Track You

    Todd Weaver, the Founder and CEO of Purism shows Leo Laporte and Aaron Newcomb the Librem line of secure Linux computers. They discuss PureOS the operating system based on Debian, and how the computers are sourced and built. Plus, he talks about their line of no-carrier, encrypted smartphone coming next year.

  • The state of cyber security: we’re all screwed

    When cybersecurity professionals converged in Las Vegas last week to expose vulnerabilities and swap hacking techniques at Black Hat and Defcon, a consistent theme emerged: the internet is broken, and if we don’t do something soon, we risk permanent damage to our economy.

    “Half of all Americans are backing away from the net due to fears regarding security and privacy,” longtime tech security guru Dan Kaminsky said in his Black Hat keynote speech, citing a July 2015 study by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. “We need to go ahead and get the internet fixed or risk losing this engine of beauty.”

  • Oh, not again: US reportedly finds new secret software in VW diesels [Ed: cannot trust proprietary software]

    Volkswagen first ended up in this situation after it admitted to intentionally installing secret software in its 2.0-liter diesels. That software curtailed nitrogen oxide emissions in lab-testing environments, but once on the road, the diesels would pollute well in excess of legal limitations. It was allegedly used in response to ever-stricter emissions regulations.

  • Chinese Hunting Chinese Over POP3 In Fjord Country

    More specifically, here at bsdly.net we've been seeing attempts at logging in to the pop3 mail retrieval service using usernames that sound distinctively like Chinese names, and the attempts originate almost exclusively from Chinese networks.

  • 'Sauron' spyware attacking targets in Belgium, China, Russia and Sweden

    A previously unknown hacking group called Strider has been conducting cyber espionage against selected targets in Belgium, China, Russia and Sweden, according to Symantec.

    The security firm suggested that the product of the espionage would be of interest to a nation state's intelligence services.

    Strider uses malware known as Remsec that appears primarily to have been designed for espionage, rather than as ransomware or any other nefarious software.

    Symantec has linked Strider with a group called Flamer which uses similar attack techniques and malware.

    The Lord of the Rings reference is deliberate as the Remsec stealth tool contains a reference to Sauron, the necromancer and main protagonist in a number of Tolkien's stories.

    "Strider has been active since at least October 2011. The group has maintained a low profile until now and its targets have been mainly organisations and individuals that would be of interest to a nation state's intelligence services," said Symantec in a blog post.

  • New MacBooks expected to feature Touch ID power button as well as OLED touch-panel [iophk: "as UID or password? Former is ok latter is insecure"]

    A source who has provided reliable information in the past has informed us that the new MacBook Pro models, expected to be launched in the fall, will feature a Touch ID power button as well as the previously-reported OLED touch-sensitive function keys.

  • it’s hard work printing nothing

    It all starts with a bug report to LibreSSL that the openssl tool crashes when it tries to print NULL. This bug doesn’t manifest on OpenBSD because libc will convert NULL strings to ”(null)” when printing. However, this behavior is not required, and as observed, it’s not universal. When snprintf silently accepts NULL, that simply leads to propagating the error.

  • London's Met Police has missed the Windows XP escape deadline [Ed: known problem, London's police is a prisoner of NSA and also China, Russia etc. [1, 2]]

    London’s Metropolitan Police has missed its deadline to dump Windows XP, with tens of thousands of copper still running the risky OS.

    The force, on the front line against terrorist threats and criminals in the capital city, is running Windows XP on around 27,000 PCs.

    At last count, in May 2015, the Met had a total of 35,640 PCs, with 34,920 of them running XP. Policemen set themselves a deadline of March 2016 to finish migrating to Windows 8.1.

    London Mayor Sadiq Khan, however, has apparently now revealed that just 8,000 of the force’s PCs have moved to Windows 8.1 since last September. The target is for another 6,000 by the end of September 2016.

    Khan provided the update in response to a question from Conservative Greater London Assembly member Andrew Boff.

  • Met Police still running Windows XP on 27,000 computers [iophk: "forget XP, Windows in general is dangerously out of date"]

    LONDON BOYS IN BLUE the Metropolitan Police may be armed with tasers and extendable batons, but they are backed up by Windows XP in a lot of cases, which is a really bad thing.

    Windows XP no longer gets official security updates, and Microsoft sees it as the sort of thing that should be scraped off shoes before walking on the carpet.

    The company will let people pay to keep using it, but only on a case-by-case basis. We do not know the police arrangement with Microsoft, but the Met needs to accelerate the updating of its computer systems as it puts Londoners' information at risk, according to London Assembly member Andrew Boff.

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TuxMachines: BSD Leftovers

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 11:59:10 AM
  • The Importance of Bell Labs Unix

    Unix was first developed by Ken Thompson in the summer of 1969 on the DEC PDP-7 minicomputer. By 1979 Unix version 7 was making the rounds at universities all over the world. Bell Labs Unix has enormous importance: It was the basis for many operating systems that followed including BSD, and the template for Minix and Linux.

  • Lumina Desktop 1.0.0 released
  • Version 1.0.0 Released

    After roughly four years of development, I am pleased to announce the first official release of the Lumina desktop environment! This release is an incredible realization of the initial idea of Lumina – a simple and unobtrusive desktop environment meant for users to configure to match their individual needs. I hope you all enjoy it, and I look forward to working with all of you on the next iterations of this desktop!

  • Lumina Desktop 1.0 Released

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LXer: Linux Media Creation: Top Apps

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 11:21:56 AM
Historically, Linux media creation has gotten a bad rap. The reasons why vary, but usually it's due to legacy applications from powerful media companies that sell expensive software. In this article, I’ll dive into the truth about Linux media creation. I’ll also focus on what software usually holds folks back and how they compare to their open source alternatives.

Reddit: SUDO I'M DELETING GNU+LINUX!

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 11:15:07 AM

SUDO I'M DELETING GNU+LINUX!

Reddit: Anyone using sSD in their linux machine, preferably in laptops? what are pros and cons you have experienced besides the faster boottime?

Tuesday 9th of August 2016 10:19:29 AM

I generally use my laptop for web browsing, school works like preparing reports, presentations and for media consumption. What will I benefit by replacing my HDD with SSD?

I know about the speed and mechanism it stores files, which sadly will decrease its speed, storage capacity and lifespan in general with more use, but what about reliability and value for money regarding its life cycle?

Will it last for me for at least 5 years of use regarding what I do with my laptop?

submitted by /u/GnomeGo
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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.