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TuxMachines: Debian and Ubuntu; BBQ Cambridge, Artful Aardvark Feature Freeze

Sunday 27th of August 2017 10:00:15 PM
  • BBQ Cambridge 2017 - post 2

    We were all up until about 0100 House full of folk talking about all sorts, a game of Mao. Garden full of people clustered round the barbeque or sitting chatting - I had a long chat about Debian, what it means and how it's often an easier world to deal with and move in than the world of work, office politics or whatever - being here is being at home.

  • BBQ Cambridge 2017 - post 3
  • OMGWTFBBQ Cambridge 2017

    Funny this - I only blog when I'm in Cambridge I'm sure there's a blog back in the day from a BBQ a good few years ago. This is almost deja vu - a room full of Debian types - the crazy family - Thinkpads on a lot of laps and lots of chat around the room.

  • Let's send patches to debian-policy (rst file is your friend

    As I posted before, now debian-policy package uses Sphinx. It means, you can edit and send patches for Debian Policy easier than ever. Get source (install devscripts package and exec 'debcheck debian-policy')  and dig into policy directory. There are several rst files for each chapter.

  • Artful Aardvark (to be 17.10) feature freeze

    While this email comes a bit late, if you've been watching your calendars, you know that Artful has been in Feature Freeze since yesterday.

    Ideally you will all now be focusing on bug fixing and not on getting new features into the release.

    As is the custom, packages that have been uploaded to artful-proposed prior to the feature freeze deadline, but have gotten stuck there, remain candidates for fixing between now and release.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Enters The Feature Freeze

    Ubuntu 17.10, the Artful Aardvark, has crossed into the feature freeze this week.

    Ubuntu developers are now to be focused on fixing bugs rather than on introducing new features for 17.10, which will be officially released at the middle of October.

    There still though is the possibility of feature freeze exceptions to be granted as well as those packages currently residing in artful-proposed are still able to land. Confirmation of the Artful feature freeze was posted today to the mailing list.

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TuxMachines: KDE: Google Summer of Code, Falkon, and Sticklyst

Sunday 27th of August 2017 09:56:50 PM
  • KDE Had Another Successful Year With Google Summer of Code

    KDE saw more than one dozen student developers interact on various projects this summer thanks to the Google Summer of Code 2017.

    The KDE projects for GSoC 20917 ranged from digiKam improvements to developing a new chat bridge, Go language support in KDevelop, HiDPI improvements, and more.

  • QupZilla Web Browser Has Revealed Its New Name

    ‘Falkon’ is the new name of cross-platform Qt web-browser QupZilla.

    The developer behind the Qupzilla browser announced the intention to rename the project in early august, and invited users of the browser to submit their own name suggestions.

  • Sticklyst Shows How KDE Frameworks Can Be Used On The Web

    Qt/KDE developer Daniel Nicoletti has written "Sticklyst" to show how KDE Frameworks 5 code can be used to construct web sites/applications.

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Phoronix: 3D OpenGL Acceleration For Windows Guests On QEMU Using VirGL/VirtIO

Sunday 27th of August 2017 09:39:19 PM
While there has been VirGL as one of the options for allowing 3D/OpenGL acceleration of Linux guests within QEMU/KVM virtual machines to allow the calls to be directed to the host system's OpenGL driver, that support hasn't been available when Windows is running as QEMU/KVM guest. That is changing though thanks in large part to this year's Google Summer of Code...

TuxMachines: LLVMpipe vs. OpenSWR Software Rendering On A 40 Core / 80 Thread Tyan Server

Sunday 27th of August 2017 09:33:16 PM

With testing out a Tyan 1U server featuring dual Intel Xeon Gold 6138 CPUs, one of the uncommon test requests we have received but understandable given our audience is curiosity about the performance of OpenGL software rendering on this 40 core / 80 thread Xeon Scalable server when making use of Mesa's LLVMpipe software rasterizer and the newer OpenSWR driver from Intel.

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Phoronix: Mesa Drivers' Use Of Multiple IRs, Gallium3D With NIR

Sunday 27th of August 2017 09:20:41 PM
Following the news this week that RadeonSI may switch to NIR completely in the future, in the forums a number of questions were raised about why the Linux graphics drivers are using multiple forms of intermediate representation and whether this would still make RadeonSI a Gallium3D driver if it doesn't default to TGSI...

Reddit: To avoid the complexity of direct linking, is there, or how might it be built, a GPU server that through a local port any program gives a code string (such as a kernel of OpenCL or RenderScript) and byte array parameter and maybe 20 milliseconds l

Sunday 27th of August 2017 08:59:56 PM

The code string might run slow the first time its called, but then a hashtable of code string to cached function could answer future calls faster.

Many programs are limited to CPUs cuz of the complexity of linking to GPU software.

Linux has low enough lag that large data can move through ports at low enough lag for interactive systems such as games or control of a robot arm.

A GPU kernel is usually a small code string defining a small thing to be done many times in parallel each with different parameters. For example, a graphics op that takes a small square of near pixels and outputs the next center pixel, or physics calculations for all objects in a near volume of space. Anything where theres far more calculations to do than input and output size.

If possible, this program should auto download and setup a GPU software that it wraps, so all a linux user needs to do is give the install and run command.

I think many programmers would use such a wrapper of GPUs that makes it a standard data format accessed through ports instead of direct linking. I would.

submitted by /u/BenRayfield
[link] [comments]

LXer: Did SUSE Linux Just Take a Dig at Red Hat Linux?

Sunday 27th of August 2017 07:56:21 PM
It seems that SUSE Linux just took a potshot at Red Hat Linux in its latest parody video. See the video and decide for yourself.

Reddit: S1220A Motherboard. Ubuntu success stories?

Sunday 27th of August 2017 04:35:43 PM

Hi.

I'm thinking of buying a new computer and I'm hearing about problems with this sound codec.

If you have a motherboard with S1220A, could you post if you have it working under default (no ppa kernel) Ubuntu installation.

Thanks.

submitted by /u/Daisuke-Jigen
[link] [comments]

LXer: Jolla officially launches Sailfish OS for Sony Xperia X, but at a hefty price

Sunday 27th of August 2017 04:01:35 PM
Sailfish OS will debut on Xperia X handsets soon... Sailfish X will initially be available without the GUI and hence the installation should be done using command line instructions on a Linux PC. Jolla is expected to release the GUI bundle along with the installation tool after the initial sales...

TuxMachines: System76's Pop!_OS Weekly Update

Sunday 27th of August 2017 03:50:17 PM
  • Pop!_OS Weekly Update: 17.10, Distro Settings, and Default Apps

    At System76 we all work in the same office so keeping the external Pop!_OS community involved and up-to-date is an interesting challenge. So far we’ve been communicating our ideas and work through our chat channel and blog. This week we decided to hold our first System76+Community meeting in Pop!_Chat to discuss default settings and apps. While the overall outcome was fantastic, there are definitely ways we can increase bandwidth between those at System76 HQ and community members around the world. We’re working on some ideas.

  • System76's Pop!_OS Not Using Wayland By Default, Figuring Out Default Apps

    -
    System76 continues working on their Ubuntu fork called Pop!_OS that they intend to ship on their future laptops and desktops. They have now decided on some of the default applications as well as the decision to not yet ship Wayland by default.

    System76 has been migrating the Pop!_OS base from Ubuntu 17.04 to 17.10 and made improvements around that to reduce the ISO size and memory usage. They have also decided for their initial release they will continue using the X.Org Server while the Wayland session will just be optional. They aren't yet moving to Wayland due to concerns around unsupported applications and confusion to users when applications are running into problems because of Wayland.

  • read more

TuxMachines: GNOME: GSoC Projects

Sunday 27th of August 2017 03:48:49 PM
  • GSoC part 15: submission

    This is the last entry in the Google Summer of Code series that I have been writing weekly for the last three months. It is different from the usual updates in that I won’t be discussing development progress: rather, this will be the submission report for the project as a whole. I’ll be discussing the "why?" behind the project, the plan that my mentor and I came up with to execute the project, the work I have done over the summer including a video of the result, the things that are left to work on, what I’ve learned during the project and finally, the links to the code that I have written for the actual submission. Of course I finish with a thank-you. Enjoy!

  • Piper Has Turned Into A Very Competent Mouse Configuration UI For Linux

    Student developer Jente Hidskes' work this summer on improving the Piper GTK3 user-interface for configuring gaming mice on Linux via libratbag is now the latest example of a very successful Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project.

    Jente was able to provide some much needed improvements to this GTK3 user-interface for configuring Linux mice via the libratbag daemon. Among the work he accomplished this summer were support for mouse profiles, resolution configuration, LED configuration, button mappings, welcome and error screens, and more.

  • GNOME Games Now Supports Controller Reassignment

    Thanks to this year's Google Summer of Code, there is a branch pending for allowing game controllers to be re-assigned within GNOME Games.

    GNOME Games, of course, is the GTK desktop program to browse your video game library and when it comes to retro games, even play them within GNOME Games thanks to libretro, etc.

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TuxMachines: SUSE Studio - Mix it up

Sunday 27th of August 2017 03:45:33 PM

It's been a long time since I played with SUSE Studio. Eight years to be exact. That's a fairly hefty stretch of time, which means another review is due. Before you ask, no it's not a German alternative rock band, nor a night club. And yes, it is an online portal that lets you create custom SUSE images. Very clever.

In my original review, I focused on the simplicity and difficulty of use of the portal, assembling different packages into a working image, the testing, and the complexity of this whole deal. I built on my earlier experience with Kiwi and then Product Creator, and back in 2009, this was an amazing, revolutionary concept. Let's see what gives now.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle: New VirtualBox 5.2 Beta, SPARC M8 Processors Launched

  • VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly
    Oracle announced new updates for its popular, cross-platform and open-source virtualization software, the third Beta of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.2 major release and VirtualBox 5.1.28 stable maintenance update. We'll start with the stable update, VirtualBox 5.1.28, as it's more important for our readers using Oracle VM VirtualBox for all of their virtualization needs. The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends, as well as an accidental crash with AC'97.
  • SPARC M8 Processors Launched
    While Oracle recently let go of some of their SPARC team, today marks the launch of the SPARC M8. The initial SPARC M8 line-up includes the T8-1, T8-2, T8-4. M8-8, and SuperCluster M8-8 servers.

Wikileaks Releases Spy Files Russia, CCleaner Infected, Equifax Has a Dirty Little Secret

  • Spy Files Russia
    This publication continues WikiLeaks' Spy Files series with releases about surveillance contractors in Russia. While the surveillance of communication traffic is a global phenomena, the legal and technological framework of its operation is different for each country. Russia's laws - especially the new Yarovaya Law - make literally no distinction between Lawful Interception and mass surveillance by state intelligence authorities (SIAs) without court orders. Russian communication providers are required by Russian law to install the so-called SORM ( Система Оперативно-Розыскных Мероприятий) components for surveillance provided by the FSB at their own expense. The SORM infrastructure is developed and deployed in Russia with close cooperation between the FSB, the Interior Ministry of Russia and Russian surveillance contractors.
  • Malware-Infected CCleaner Installer Distributed to Users Via Official Servers for a Month
    Hackers have managed to embed malware into the installer of CCleaner, a popular Windows system optimization tool with over 2 billion downloads to date. The rogue package was distributed through official channels for almost a month. CCleaner is a utilities program that is used to delete temporary internet files such as cookies, empty the Recycling Bin, correct problems with the Windows Registry, among other tasks. First released in 2003, it has become hugely popular; up to 20 million people download it per month. Users who downloaded and installed CCleaner or CCleaner Cloud between Aug. 15 and Sept. 12 should scan their computers for malware and update their apps. The 32-bit versions of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 were affected.
  • Equifax Suffered a Hack [sic] Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed
  • This is why you shouldn’t use texts for two-factor authentication

    For a long time, security experts have warned that text messages are vulnerable to hijacking — and this morning, they showed what it looks like in practice.

Amazon Changes Rental ('Cloud') Model on GNU/Linux

Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC
    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.
  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen
    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.
  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD
    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.
  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years
    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.