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Updated: 1 hour 22 min ago

TuxMachines: Security: Reaper, Bad Rabbit, Kaspersky, CAPTCHA Weaknesses

Friday 27th of October 2017 07:22:52 AM

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LXer: Is Raleigh the East Coast's Silicon Valley?

Friday 27th of October 2017 05:20:13 AM
Talk very long to first time visitors at Raleigh's All Thing Open conference and sooner or later you're bound to hear the city compared to Silicon Valley. New attendees are often wowed by their first impression of the scope of the local tech industry, sometimes from merely walking through the rows of vendor booths where there seems to be no shortage of local development houses doing well enough to afford vendor space in order to hawk products and do some networking.

Reddit: Searching good used laptop to run linux

Friday 27th of October 2017 04:23:02 AM

Hi, i want to buy a used laptop(arround 13", for ~400€) to run arch or centos, i would mostly use it while im arround so it should not be to expensive. Im from Germany so if you have the german price it would be great. Im not 100% sure if this is the right subreddit. Thank you so far.

Edit: it should have a usb 3.0 slot.

submitted by /u/floriplum
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: Ubuntu: Ubuntu 17.10 Review, Ubuntu Core, Security and MAAS

Friday 27th of October 2017 04:07:13 AM
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Review

    Ubuntu 17.10: Unity is gone and gnome shell is in as the default desktop. But how does it function? What about the Linux software and how does it stack up against competing Linux OS? Will Unity users be happy? In this review, I take a look at Ubuntu 17.10 and try to answer those questions.

  • Thinger.io uses Ubuntu Core & snaps for easy IoT deployment

    Thinger.io is a Spanish start up founded in 2015 who aim to enable any developer or organisation to develop IoT applications across a range of sectors, with examples including smart cities, Industry 4.0 and energy monitoring. Thinger.io has already grown to have 10,000 registered users of their platform but with such growing demand, they needed a quicker way to deliver their systems and applications. With a philosophy of using flexible and open technologies, Thinger.io discovered snaps as their ideal solution. Using Snapcraft.io for building snaps has decreased their development time dramatically and streamlined the time taken to release new packages.

  • [Ubuntu] Security Team Weekly Summary: October 26, 2017
  • MAAS Development Update – October 25th

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TuxMachines: AMD EPYC 7551 Linux Benchmarks

Friday 27th of October 2017 03:57:23 AM

One step below AMD's current top-end EPYC 7601 server processor is the EPYC 7551. The EPYC 7551 costs around $800 USD less than the 7601 while still being a 32 core / 64 thread part but with slightly lower clock frequencies. In this article is a look at the EPYC 7251 / 7351P / 7401P / 7551 / 7601 Ubuntu Linux performance compared to various Intel Xeon CPUs in our lab.

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LXer: Why is Kubernetes so popular?

Friday 27th of October 2017 03:54:27 AM
Kubernetes, an open source container management system, has surged in popularity in the past several years. Used by the largest enterprises in a wide range of industries for mission-critical tasks, it has become one of the biggest success stories in open source. How did that happen? And what is it about Kubernetes that explains its widespread adoption?read more

TuxMachines: On End of Linux Mint KDE Edition

Friday 27th of October 2017 03:35:26 AM
  • Linux Mint to No Longer Offer a KDE Edition After Release of Linux Mint 18.3

    Linux Mint founder Clement Lefebvre announced that the upcoming Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" operating system is the last release to ship with a KDE edition.

    So, believe it or not, Linux Mint is dropping the KDE Edition after the release of Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" next month. Clement Lefebvre said that he and his team want to concentrate more on making Linux Mint a better GNU/Linux operating system, and they no longer want to focus on the Linux Mint KDE Edition.

    "With Linux Mint 18.3, we’ll release one more KDE edition. I wanted this announcement to come before the release," said Clement Lefebvre. "It will hurt its popularity of course, but I wanted to give users time, either to react right now or to take their time, upgrade and adapt to this later on. I’m sure this edition will be missed, and I hope its users understand our decision."

  • Linux Mint 18.3 will be the last to include KDE spin

    Clem Lefebvre, head of the Linux Mint project, has authored a new blog post detailing plans about the project’s future. He said the Linux Mint 19 will only be available in Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce flavours and that the KDE spin will be discontinued. Mint 18.3 will still be available with KDE out of the box.

  • Linux Mint Is Killing Its KDE Edition, Debian-based LMDE 3 “Cindy” Is Coming

    Last month, we told you that Linux Mint 18.3 will be codenamed Sylvia and gave you a preview of what features you should expect from the upcoming release. While there isn’t any specific release date fixed for Mint 18.3, we can expect to land somewhere in December 2017 with Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS base.

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LXer: Best Linux Distros For Gaming (Part 2)

Friday 27th of October 2017 02:28:40 AM
Who doesn’t love games? We all play games no matter what our age is but there is a thing. We all search for the best gaming distro for our PC’s. Gone are the days when the games on linux were hard to get and gaming distro were hard to spot. Today I am going to mention some of the best gaming distro for Linux. Also check out the part 1 of this article we covered here. Without wasting more time let’s get started on the list.

Reddit: Nvidia sucks and I’m sick of it

Friday 27th of October 2017 02:07:38 AM

Reddit: I found yesterday an article where the authore wrote he can't access as root and update the system without sudo. Is this inaccurate?

Friday 27th of October 2017 01:55:32 AM

Here the article:

When playing around with Debian 9 on my own, a small gotcha caught me off-guard. After I installed Debian from the GNOME live ISO, my user account suddenly didn't have sudo access. That means if I wanted to update or install my system, I couldn't do it.

Can't I access as root with su then update the system with apt-get update && apt-get upgrade?

submitted by /u/_dartico_
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LXer: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" Might Launch with Linux Kernel 4.15, GNOME 3.28

Friday 27th of October 2017 01:02:54 AM
Earlier this week, Canonical's Mark Shuttleworth named the next major release of the Ubuntu Linux operating system as "Bionic Beaver," and now the Ubuntu Kernel team shares some insights of what will be the default Linux kernel of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Phoronix: Fedora 27 Isn't Ready For Release, Fedora Modular Server Pushed Back To December

Friday 27th of October 2017 12:32:25 AM
Open blocker bugs are preventing Fedora 27 from being released next week...

LXer: SODIMM-style COM and dev board run Android 7.1.1 on a Snapdragon 820

Thursday 26th of October 2017 11:37:08 PM
VIA’s “SOM-9X20” module runs Android 7.1.1 on a quad-core Snapdragon 820, with 4GB LPDDR4, 64GB eMMC, WiFi, BT, GPS, and an optional dev board. VIA Technologies has launched its VIA SOM-9X20 computer-on-module with an Android 7.1.1 BSP running on a Qualcomm Snapdragon 820. The SODIMM form factor, 82 x 45mm module, which is accompanied by […]

Phoronix: GTK Adds Support For KDE's Server-Side Decorations On Wayland

Thursday 26th of October 2017 10:48:14 PM
Running GTK3 applications on a KDE Plasma Wayland session will soon look better with GNOME's toolkit now supporting the KDE server-side decorations...

LXer: Introduction To VPN And Here Is How to Use It In Linux

Thursday 26th of October 2017 10:11:22 PM
A VPN, or Virtual Private Network, is a security concept designed to allow remote users to connect to a particular local network to the internet via a secure tunnel. In simpler terms, a VPN is an encrypted connection between two (or more) remote computers.

More in Tux Machines

OnePlus 5T review: Come for the value, not the excitement

OnePlus isn't interested in holding back on specs, features or capabilities to make a big reveal of a new phone just once a year. The scrappy company has settled in on a refresh cycle every six months, with a big release followed by a mid-cycle bump to bring in the latest things it's been working on. The OnePlus 5T isn't meant to be an innovative leap of technology that blows your socks off — and honestly, none of its predecessors have been particularly groundbreaking, either. Nope, the 5T is still about value, simplicity and being tuned for what the Android enthusiast crowd craves from its phones. At $479 there wasn't much about the OnePlus 5 you could find a flaw with. Now six months later with a bigger screen, new secondary camera, neat Face Unlock feature and a $20 price bump, it's a pretty easy equation to figure out. Read more

DragonBoard gains a camera kit

Arrow’s DragonBoard 410c Camera Kit combines the 96Boards SBC with D3’s DesignCore Camera Mezzanine Board OV5640 and a 5-megapixel camera module. D3 Engineering’s DesignCore Camera Mezzanine Board OV5640 is a 96Boards mezzanine add-on designed to work only with the Arrow Electronics/Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c. Arrow and D3 have now launched a kit that provides a DragonBoard 410c with the D3 board and a miniature 5-megapixel autofocus camera module. The kit’s Linux software runs on the 96Boards CE SBC’s quad-core Cortex-A53 based Snapdragon 410 SoC. Read more

OnePlus 5T review—An outstanding combination of specs, design, and price

After launching the OnePlus 5 earlier this year, OnePlus is back with an end-of-year upgrade for the device. The OnePlus 5T takes a winning formula—high-end specs with a low price tag and a metal body—and reworks the front of the phone to dedicate as much space as possible to the screen. This device has a new screen, a new button layout, a new fingerprint reader, and a new camera setup. It almost feels like a totally new device. We liked the OnePlus 5 from earlier in the year, but, with the more modern design, OnePlus has fixed OnePlus 5's biggest downside. The result is something that is extremely compelling—a $500 phone that makes you question exactly why you'd give $800 to those other OEMs when this has nearly everything the more expensive phones have. Read more

Linus Torvalds: 'I don't trust security people to do sane things'

Linus Torvalds has offered his thoughts on Linux security approaches, branding some security professionals as "f*cking morons" for focusing on process-killing rather than debugging. Torvalds, the creator and principal developer of the Linux kernel, does not often pull his punches when it comes to the kernel's behaviors and security. The engineer carried on the tradition over the weekend, as Google Pixel developer Kees Cook submitted a pull request for hardened usercopy changes for v4.15-rc1, which according to Cook, narrows areas of memory "that can be copied to/from userspace in the face of usercopy bugs by adding explicit whitelisting for slab cache regions." Read more Also: Linux creator slams security bods