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Updated: 1 min 41 sec ago

Reddit: Is there any clean way to move Linux Mint from an HDD to an SSD?

Thursday 8th of September 2016 01:49:02 AM

As the title says. I originally installed Mint on my hard drive because I didn't know if I wanted to use it. Now that I have been using it for almost a month, I want to keep it and move it to my SSD. Is there any clean way to do that?

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TuxMachines: Games for GNU/Linux

Thursday 8th of September 2016 01:47:11 AM

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LXer: LibreOffice 5.2.1 Office Suite Released with Over 100 Improvements

Thursday 8th of September 2016 01:44:39 AM
Italo Vignoli from The Document Foundation was happy to inform Softpedia via an email announcement about the general availability of the first point release of the LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite.

Phoronix: Wireshark 2.2 Released

Thursday 8th of September 2016 01:12:46 AM
Wireshark 2.2 is now available as the newest version of this widely-used packet analyzer program...

LXer: Camera/sensor kit adds obstacle avoidance to drones

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 11:50:17 PM
Parrot’s Ubuntu- and ROS-driven, Tegra K1 based “S.L.A.M.dunk” development kit has a stereo camera and sensors that adds obstacle avoidance to drones. Parrot’s S.L.A.M.dunk, which is named for its integrated Simultaneous Localization and Mapping algorithm, can be added to any Linux-driven drone to help it navigate indoors or in other barrier-rich outdoor environments where GPS […]

LXer: Non-Linux FOSS: Chrome, for One

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 10:53:06 PM
When I use OS X, I really like the Fluid app for making standalone Webapplications. The problem is, Fluid isn't free unless you want the basicversion. I don't mind paying for an application (and I did pay for Fluid),but it seems like something as simple as a single site browser shouldn'tbe something that costs money.

Reddit: Vi command question

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 10:27:39 PM

I am just learning Vi so I apologize if this is an easy question.

I have been looking but have been unable to find a way to copy a file to a different directory (already exists) while in Vi, while also making that copied file the new current working file.

Does anyone know of a command to do this in Vi?

The only way I have been able to do it is to copy the file to the new dir, then opening the file using two separate commands. I am trying to find a way to copy it to the new directory while also opening that new copy in its new directory to make changes.

Thanks for any advice or help!

submitted by /u/cosmoninja
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LXer: Dig Into DNS: Part 1

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 09:55:55 PM
In this series of articles, I will explore the powerful dig utility. For those who haven't used the command before, these articles will give a useful overview of its features and uses. And, for those that have utilized dig in the past, the articles should serve as a reminder of the tool’s versatility and extensive functionality.

Reddit: my graphics card driver isn't supported?

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 09:39:49 PM

Hey everyone, I just did a fresh reinstall of Linux 16.04 lts, and I was trying to install my driver for a AMD Sapphire R9 270x. I went to their website and saw the drivers are not supported on linux :(. Is there anything I can do?

submitted by /u/the_hype_train
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LinuxToday: Stealthy, tricky to remove rootkit targets Linux systems on ARM and x86

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 09:00:00 PM

Called Umbreon, after a Pokemon character that hides in the darkness, the rootkit has been in development since early 2015 and is now being sold on the underground markets.

LXer: Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" Beta 2 Released

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 08:58:44 PM
Today the Black Lab development team is pleased to release “Onyx” Beta 2 - this brings us one step closer to the stable release of Black Lab 8 due in late November. Our team is continuously dedicated to bringing you the best Linux desktop – Black Lab is and will continue to be the standard bearer, introducing cutting-edge features without sacrificing usability and stability or a unique, intuitive desktop interface.New features of “Onyx” Beta 2 :

TuxMachines: Camera/sensor kit adds obstacle avoidance to drones

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 08:50:23 PM

Parrot’s Ubuntu- and ROS-driven, Tegra K1 based “S.L.A.M.dunk” development kit has a stereo camera and sensors that adds obstacle avoidance to drones.

Parrot’s S.L.A.M.dunk, which is named for its integrated Simultaneous Localization and Mapping algorithm, can be added to any Linux-driven drone to help it navigate indoors or in other barrier-rich outdoor environments where GPS signals are not available. Assuming obstacle avoidance technology can be sufficiently refined, indoor package delivery may be the next big application for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). There are also many outdoor environments such as wooded and urban areas where drones struggle to navigate by GPS and standard imaging alone.

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Reddit: Another success for drm.

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 08:49:35 PM

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 08:39:07 PM
  • Sony wins battle over preinstalled Windows in Europe’s top court [more comments]

    The sale of a computer equipped with pre-installed software isn't an unfair commercial practice because most customers prefer to buy a laptop they can use straight away, Europe’s top court has ruled in a victory for Sony.

    "Failure to indicate the price of each item of pre-installed software" isn't misleading, the Court of Justice of the European Union added in its ruling (PDF) on Wednesday.

  • Writing GStreamer Elements in Rust (Part 2): Don’t panic, we have better assertions now – and other updates
  • Linux Top 3: Porteus Kiosk 4.1, 4MLinux 19 and TrueOS
  • feren OS 2016.2 Screenshot Tour
  • SwagArch 16.09.1 Alpha 4 Screenshot Tour
  • Mozilla, systemd, compiler update in Tumbleweed

    QtCon, Akademy and VideoLAN Dev Days in Berlin this past week kept many developers busy, but openSUSE’s rolling release kept going forward.

    Tumbleweed had one new snapshot since that last article was published and more is expected this week.

    Snapshot 20160901 provided Mozilla updates for both Firefox and Thunderbird in the repositories. Firefox updated to version 48.0.2 and Thunderbird to version 45.3.0.

  • Spark Comparison: AWS vs. GCP [Ed: False dichotomy, as if giving all your processing, bandwidth data etc. to the US government is inevitable]

    There’s little doubt that cloud computing will play an important role in data science for the foreseeable future. The flexible, scalable, on-demand computing power available is an important resource, and as a result, there’s a lot of competition between the providers of this service. Two of the biggest players in the space are Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform (GCP).

  • Arduino Open Source Platform Fuels IoT and Farming’s Future

    Arduino, the world’s leading open-source software and hardware ecosystem, is being used to power Farmbot, the revolutionary farming robot that is built fully on open source. Farmbot is a computer numerical control (CNC) farming machine and software package for small scale, hyper local, DIY food production. It is controlled by and Arduino RAMPS stack and connected to the Internet using Raspberry Pi 2. The platform is designed to be simple, scalable, hackable, and easily made.

    “The applications that are fueling the IoT market are astonishing, and open source technology is playing a big role in it,” said Federico Musto, CEO of Arduino S.r.L. “Predicted to become a $6 trillion market by 2021, the IoT market is starting to take shape with advancements in wearables, healthcare, smart homes and cities, law enforcement, automotive, and, of course agriculture. We are proud to be a part of Farmbot, and look forward to continuing to fuel IoT deployments.”

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TuxMachines: OSS Leftovers

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 08:35:51 PM

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Reddit: The Android Runtime On Chrome OS Makes Use Of Wayland

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 08:22:36 PM

TuxMachines: Android Leftovers

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 08:03:07 PM

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LXer: Google's 3-level Android patch could cause confusion

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 08:01:33 PM
Google has released another large monthly batch of security patches for Android, this time fixing 55 vulnerabilities, eight of which are rated critical. The fixes are split into three different "security patch levels," which could make it easier for device manufacturers to integrate patches applicable to their devices, but could also lead to confusion among regular users.

TuxMachines: Linux Foundation and Linux

Wednesday 7th of September 2016 07:44:59 PM
  • Limited number of LPC registrations available starting September 8
  • New Members Strengthen Automotive Grade Linux Security and Software Capabilities

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative open source project developing a Linux-based, open platform for the connected car, today announced that AutoIO Technology, Irdeto, Link Motion, Pocket Soft, sdtech and Synopsys have joined The Linux Foundation and Automotive Grade Linux.

  • How blockchain will disrupt your business

    Like mobile and cloud, blockchain — first implemented in the original source code of bitcoin in 2009 — stands poised to profoundly disrupt business. If it lives up to its promise, it won't just be financial institutions that are disrupted.

    "If you can transfer money or something of value through the internet just like another form of data, what else can you do with it? It provides a way to establish trust in the digital world," says Angus Champion de Crespigny, Financial Services Blockchain and Distributed Infrastructure Strategy Leader, Ernst & Young. "How do you ensure something is the original copy of something on the internet? Prior to blockchain technology, you couldn't."

    "If you want to prove something happened in the digital world, there is no more secure place to do that," he adds. "Once information is recorded on there, it is, for all intents and purposes, impossible to go back and retroactively change that. When there are such drastic new technologies that emerge, it isn't just a matter of looking at your business and thinking how this technology is going to make your business more effective. What you should be doing is considering that maybe your business isn't structured correctly for this new world."

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More in Tux Machines

New Releases

  • Security-Oriented Qubes OS 3.2 Improves the Integrated Management Infrastructure
    Today, September 29, 2016, Joanna Rutkowska announced the general availability of the second point release of the Qubes OS 3 stable series of the security-oriented and open-source Linux-based computer operating system. Qubes OS 3.2 is a maintenance release, which means that it mostly adds general fixes and improvements to various of the distribution's core components and functionalities, including the integrated management infrastructure that was introduced as part of the previous update, Qubes 3.1, allowing users to also manage the "insides" of a virtual machine.
  • Alpine Linux 3.4.4 Is Out, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.22 LTS, OpenSSL Patches
    Today, September 28, 2016, Alpine Linux creator and lead developer Natanael Cop has the pleasure of announcing the release of the fourth maintenance update to the latest stable Alpine Linux 3.4 server-oriented operating system series. Alpine Linux 3.4.4 is out as the most advanced version, powered by the recently released, long-term supported Linux 4.4.22 kernel and bringing up-to-date components to make your Alpine Linux-based server(s) more stable and reliable than ever. Most of the core components have been updated, but the most important one is OpenSSL 1.0.2j, which received the latest security fixes, just like in the rest of the GNU/Linux distros.

Leftovers: Software

  • Web Publishing and Development: Free Tools Abound
    Are you involved in DevOps and web development, or are you aiming to be? If so, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find our latest roundup of free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6.1 Released
  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 Adds a Dark Theme, Notification Muting
  • GNOME Calendar Pencils In Great New Features
    GNOME Calendar is one of the few decent desktop calendaring apps available on Linux — and it's going to get better.
  • The future of GNOME Calendar
    Today, the Calendar Team had the first meeting in history. Isaque, Lapo, Renata, Vamsi and I attended it, and the meeting was extremely productive! In fact, we were able to sketch out the general direction that GNOME Calendar will head towards.

More Android Leftovers

  • ​Google beats back Oracle again in Java Android case
    To recap, Oracle claimed the 37 Java application programming interface (API) packages Google used to develop Android are covered by copyright. Of course, that's not really the issue. True, the the US Federal Circuit Court of Appeals foolishly ruled that APIs could be copyrighted. But the US District Court for the Northern District of California ruled in May 2016 that Google's use of the Java APIs were not subject to copyright licensing fees. Instead, Android's use of the APIs was covered by "fair use."
  • Google’s Open Source Fuchsia OS: The Mystery Linux Distro
    Few things are more tantalizing than a good mystery, and Google is making waves for an open source-centric mystery that may end up having profound implications. It all started in August when an extensive and unusual code repository for a new operating system called Fuchsia was discovered online, and now the growing source code set is on GitHub. Thus far, Google officials have been mostly mum on the aim of this operating system, although they have made a few things clear in chat forums. Two developers listed on Fuchsia's GitHub page — Christopher Anderson and Brian Swetland — are known for their work with embedded systems. The Verge, among other sites, has made a few logical deductions about the possible embedded systems focus for Fuchsia: “Looking into Fuchsia's code points gives us a few clues. For example, the OS is built on Magenta, a “medium-sized microkernel” that is itself based on a project called LittleKernel, which is designed to be used in embedded systems,” the site reports. The GitHub postings that confirm that Fuchsia is based on Magenta are particularly notable because Magenta has had applications in the embedded systems space. Here are some direct quotes: "Magenta is a new kernel that powers the Fuchsia OS. Magenta is composed of a microkernel as well as a small set of userspace services, drivers, and libraries necessary for the system to boot, talk to hardware, load userspace processes and run them, etc. Fuchsia builds a much larger OS on top of this foundation."
  • As Blackberry pulls out of handset business it has some big patent strategy calls to make

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Budgie-Remix Makes Progress With Ubuntu 16.10 Base, Beta 2 Released
    Budgie-Remix, the unofficial Ubuntu spin making use of the Budgie Desktop, has released its 16.10 Beta 2 milestone following this week's Yakkety Yak Beta 2 release. Budgie-Remix is re-based to the latest Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety package changes. In addition, a number of the Budgie-0Remix packages have been working their way into Debian proper and thus are available to Ubuntu 16.10 users via the official channels. Now available this way is the budgie-desktop package, Moka icon theme, Faba icon theme, and the Arc theme. The Ubuntu repository has also pulled in the Budgie artwork and wallpaper packages too.
  • Yakkety Yak Final Beta Released
  • Canonical Launches Commercial Support for Kubernetes
    Canonical, the lead commercial vendor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system, is getting into the Kubernetes market. Canonical now offers a freely available implementation of Kubernetes as well as commercial-support options. "I have no doubt that Kubernetes will be one of the major container co-ordination systems," Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu, told ServerWatch.
  • [How To] Build an Ubuntu Controlled Sous-Vide Cooker
    I’ll be honest with you from the off: I had zero idea what sous-vide cooking was before I started writing this post. Wikipedia dutifully informs me that’s Sous-Vide is a style of cooking that involves a vacuum, bags, and steam.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro Linux Mini PC Launches For $395
    This week a new version of the popular Mintbox Mini Linux PC has been launched for $395 in the form of the Mintbox Mini Pro which is now equipped with 120 GB of SSD mSATA together with 64-bit AMD A10-Micro6700T system-on-a-chip with Radeon R6 graphics and features 8GB of DDR3L. The latest Mintbox Mini Pro is shipped preloaded with the awesome Linux Mint 18 operating system and includes a microSD card slot a serial port, and a micro SIM card reader. The new Mintbox Mini Pro is the same size as the original and measures 4.3 x 3.3 x 0.9 inches in size and weighs in at around 255g. The Linux mini PC incorporates a fanless design and features an all-metal case made of aluminium and zinc.