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Updated: 1 hour 57 min ago

TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Friday 3rd of February 2017 05:13:19 PM
  • Report: SDN, NFV, and open source: the operator’s view

    Our library of 1700 research reports is available only to our subscribers. We occasionally release ones for our larger audience to benefit from. This is one such report. If you would like access to our entire library, please subscribe here. Subscribers will have access to our 2017 editorial calendar, archived reports and video coverage from our 2016 and 2017 events.

  • NFV Interoperability Testing Needs to Accelerate

    Plus, vendors that have made major investments in MANO platforms for NFV environments are also validating NFV interoperability across their platforms. HPE, for example, has an OpenNFV partner program through which it tests and validates NFV interoperability.

  • Update on San Francisco's Open Source Voting System!

    As many may know, the OSI has been involved in supporting the adoption of an open source elections system in San Francisco, California. The following is an update from Chris Jerdonek, Elections Commissioner & President of the San Francisco Elections Commission.

    We'd like to thank Chris for all of his hard work in raising awareness of open source software and its value for elections as well as keeping all of us up to date on the latest developments. If you'd like to learn more about the project, please contact Chris directly.

  • 4 questions to answer when choosing community metrics to measure

    Thus far in the Community Metrics Playbook column, I've discussed the importance of setting goals to guide the metrics process, outlined the general types of metrics that are useful for studying your community, and reviewed technical details of available tools. As you are deciding which metrics to track for your community, having a deeper understanding of each area is important so you not only choose good metrics, but also understand and plan for what to do when the numbers don't line up with expectations.

  • a2k17 hackathon report: Patrick Wildt on the arm64 port
  • House Bill Would Curb Open Data on Race, Affordable Housing

    Open data supporters have expressed trepidation over a new House bill that states Federal agencies will no longer be able to use geospatial information to create open databases on racial disparities and affordable housing.

    HR 482, or the Local Zoning Decisions Protection Act of 2017, moved to the House Committee on Financial Services on Jan. 12. Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, sponsored the bill, which would render Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) ineffective. AFFH, a 2015 ruling of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), requires certain HUD grantees to conduct an Assessment of Fair Housing (AFH) planning process.

  • Wallonia claims success for its Digital Strategy

    Wallonia wants to modernise government service delivery and make it ‘digital by default’. It has created a online enterprise portal, aggregating 18 existing services. It has also made the first 150 government data sets publicly available on its open data portal and overhauled its geoportal, providing access to all of the region’s geodata.

  • How the University of Hawaii is solving today's higher ed problems

    Openness invites greater participation and it takes advantage of the shared energy of collaborators. The strength of openly created educational resources comes paradoxically from the vulnerability of the shared experience of that creation process.

    One of the leaders in Open Educational Resources (OER) is Billy Meinke, educational technologist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The University's open creation model uses Pressbooks, which Billy tells me more about in this interview.

  • Hitchhiker's Guide to Serverless JavaScript

    Although Serverless has become a bit of a buzzword recently, Steven Faulkner, Director of Platform Engineering at Bustle, disagrees that it is just a fad. In his talk at Node.js Interactive, he points out that much of the faults that people find in Serverless -- that it doesn't scale, that it is not production ready, that it’s too slow and expensive -- are provenly false.

  • Hitchhiker's Guide to"'Serverless" Javascript by Steven Faulkner, Bustle

    This talk from Node.js Interactive provides concrete knowledge of what going serverless really means, so you can decide if it makes sense for your own infrastructure.

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TuxMachines: Mozilla News

Friday 3rd of February 2017 05:12:24 PM

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TuxMachines: WordPress Addons

Friday 3rd of February 2017 05:11:22 PM
  • 8 Essential WordPress Plugins Your Website Must Have

    WordPress, what a CMS right? So many available plugins, themes, and tutorials. More than 27% of world websites are powered by a WordPress CMS. A staggering statistic which kinda indicates the level of functionality and flexibility it offers to webmasters. A complete website solution with an easy-to-use aura surrounding it.

    Chances are that while you are reading this another WordPress website has been launched into the vast ocean of information we call the Internet. Hell, you’ve probably reached this article by researching about WordPress after hearing that Joe from high school is making tons of money with his WordPress sites.

  • WordPress Updates in CentOS 7 + Apache + SELinux

    A couple of weeks ago I moved my WordPress blogs from a trivial shared hosting to a more sophisticated VPS running CentOS 7 since I was in search of more flexibility from my server.

    During these days, I learned a lot about managing a web server on my own and I’m still currently learning a ton of interesting things about this topic.

    One of the most annoying problems I faced a couple of days ago concerned, in particular, my WordPress installation. Everytime I was trying to update its core and plugins, the dashboard showed me a message similar to this...

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TuxMachines: FOSS in Government

Friday 3rd of February 2017 05:10:10 PM

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LXer: Calculate Linux 17 Cinnamon is here

Friday 3rd of February 2017 05:06:08 PM
Calculate Linux Calculate Linux 17 was launched back at the very end of last year in KDE and MATE editions, You can check Calculate Linux 17 Released.Now it is time to taste the new flavour, Cinnamon.Calculate Linux Team has announced the release of Calculate Linux 17 Cinnamon.

TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

Friday 3rd of February 2017 05:04:53 PM
  • Click Here to Kill Everyone

    With the Internet of Things, we’re building a world-size robot. How are we going to control it?

  • New open source project Trireme aims to secure containers

    A team made of former Cisco and Nuage Networks veterans has developed an open source project it released this week named Trireme that takes an application-centric approach to securing code written in containers.

  • An Introduction to the Shorewall Firewall Tool

    Linux is well known for being a highly secure platform. One of the reasons for said security is the Netfilter system. For those that don’t know, Netfilter is a framework, provided by the Linux kernel, that allows for various networking operations, such as packet filtering, network address translations, port translation, and the ability to block packets from reaching specific locations. For most distributions, Netfilter is implemented through the user-space application, iptables. Although many would agree that iptables is the most powerful security tool you can work with, along with that power comes a level of complexity that stumps many an IT administrator.

    That’s where the likes of Shorewall comes into play. Shorewall is an open source firewalling tool that not only makes the task of network security easier, it also allows for much easier handling of zones. Shorewall uses zones to define different portions of a network. Say, for instance, you want to create a private internal network that can only be accessed by specific machines, a guest network that can be accessed by anyone, a network dedicated to production machines, and a network that can be accessed from machines outside your Local Area Network (LAN). With Shorewall, you can easily do this.

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Linux.com: This Week in Open Source News: OSS Leaders Oppose Immigration Ban, $800 Linux Laptop Announced & More

Friday 3rd of February 2017 05:00:09 PM
Title: This Week in Open Source News: OSS Leaders Oppose Immigration Ban, $800 Linux Laptop Announced & More3 FebLearn more

Reddit: My friend asked me to install Linux on her laptop. I could't say no

Friday 3rd of February 2017 04:43:18 PM

I want to share a second victory installing Debian to a friend of mine.

6 months ago my flatmate asked me to install her a new Windows on her old laptop with Windows Vista. I offered her Xubuntu, and she was very happy with it til those days.

This time, another friend of mine approached me, asking if I could install Linux on her new laptop. She was looking for secure OS actually, being the kind of person that tapes her webcam for security.

Anyway, I did it. Using a Debian 8.7.1 + Mate + Firmware image, encrypting the disk, and installing extra apps and tweaking some stuff I left her with a beautiful setup. (The pic is from a virtual image I tested before try it on the terminal).

  • Theme: Ambiance
  • Icons: Flat Remix
  • File Manager: PcManFM (I replaced it over Caja as Desktop Manager)

She was completely amazed that how fast the computer was starting up, compared with Windows 10. I showed her how to use synaptic, but she always can send me a message for any kind of question.

Normally she will use it to browse the web, check emails, an office suite, edit images, watch movies, listen to music. No AAA games or Windows blobs needed.

In exchange I get a great dinner and a German red wine :)

submitted by /u/i_post_from_a_fax
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LXer: The 7 Elements of an Open Source Management Program: Strategy and Process

Friday 3rd of February 2017 01:43:21 PM
This series of articles will provide a high-level overview of the various elements in an open source management program, survey the challenges in establishing a new open source license compliance program, and provide advice on how to overcome those challenges.

Reddit: Which udisks-enabled automounter would let me trigger events on mounts to make my own autoruns?

Friday 3rd of February 2017 01:27:08 PM
  1. udev can detect block device appearance
  2. udisks gets notified because of udev rules and announces this via dbus somehow
  3. (currently on my system) udiskie gets notified via dbus and mounts it
  4. but udev doesn't notify of mounts and neither does udiskie

So I'd either have to make a waiter, but that's unreliable and could be solved by replacing udiskie with something better. So what else could I use?

More considerations: 1. From my POV, autoruns require a mounted fs, so just knowing of a block device won't do. 2. Assume I have root, of course.

submitted by /u/wimuan
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Reddit: Vaults - Encryption in Plasma

Friday 3rd of February 2017 01:15:19 PM

LinuxToday: How to make file-specific setting changes in Vim using Modeline

Friday 3rd of February 2017 01:00:00 PM

HowToForge: While plugins are no doubt one of Vim's biggest strengths, there are several other functionalities that make it one of the most powerful and feature-rich text editors/IDEs available to Linux users today.

Reddit: Can anyone tell me where I can get a cheap, say under $100 tablet with Ubuntu preinstalled?

Friday 3rd of February 2017 12:57:35 PM

I've become obsessed recently with ubuntu and I really want to be mobile with the OS any suggestions?

submitted by /u/CMDRBottoms
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LXer: Gentoo-Based Calculate Linux 17 OS Now Has a Cinnamon Spin, and It Looks Great

Friday 3rd of February 2017 12:46:10 PM
Calculate Linux developer Alexander Tratsevskiy announced today the general availability of an official Cinnamon edition of his Gentoo-based Calculate Linux 17 operating system.

TuxMachines: Linux Devices

Friday 3rd of February 2017 12:31:34 PM
  • Olimex announces Teres 1 open hardware laptop

    Based on the company's successful range of single-board computers for educational, embedded, and industrial use, the Teres I laptop isn't likely to win any awards for performance. At its heart is a quad-core 64-bit AllWinner A64 system-on-chip (SoC) based on the ARM Cortex-A53 core, linked to 1GB of RAM and with 4GB of eMMC flash storage. This is then linked to a keyboard, touchpad, and 11.6in 1,366 x 768 LCD display with webcam and housed in a compact chassis with a 7000mAh battery to keep it running.

  • Olimex Teres I is an open source, DIY laptop kit for $240

    There are laptops that run open source software. And then there’s the Olimix Teres I laptop, which is not only designed to run Linux-based software, but which features open source hardware: you can find the CAD files necessary to build your own laptop at the project’s github page.

  • Kontron launches Linux-friendly Kaby Lake COMs

    Kontron has shipped three COM Express Basic and Compact Type 6 modules with Intel’s 7th Gen Kaby Lake CPUs, up to 32GB DDR4, and extended temp support. Kontron has stepped up to Intel’s “Kaby Lake” generation by launching three COM Express Type 6 modules supporting the latest 7th Generation Intel Core and Xeon processors.

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Reddit: password recovery in LINUX

Friday 3rd of February 2017 12:30:42 PM

TuxMachines: Debian and Ubuntu

Friday 3rd of February 2017 11:50:08 AM
  • Debian Fun in January 2017
  • First Tails beta release based on Stretch

    Today, I have released the first beta for Tails 3.0, that will be the first version of Tails based on Debian 9 (Stretch).

    Our automated test suite pretends it works pretty well and matches our safety expectations. I'm inclined to trust it. But as we learned after porting Tails to Squeeze, Wheezy and Jessie: quick, exploratory testing of pre-releases will not identify all the remaining regressions.

  • Mir Display Server Lands API Changes, Relicenses Headers To LGPL

    Canonical's Mir developers are working to get Mir 1.0 released in 2017 and in preparation for that stable milestone they have just landed a number of API changes.

    Just a few days ago we were talking about the Mir 0.26 features while the latest Mir happenings is a number of API changes. Today there were a number of new APIs published for the Mir client library, the Mir render surface APIs were deprecated, and other API changes.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Linux Devices

  • AsteroidOS 1.0 Alpha on the Asus Zenwatch 3
    In a previous article, I published a small userspace image and Linux kernel for the Zenwatch 3 that enables root access with SSH over USB on the watch. By now, I reached my initial goal to get AsteroidOS, the alternative Android Wear operating system, running on the Zenwatch 3. Similar to SailfishOS and Ubuntu Touch, AsteroidOS uses the original Android kernel - a patched Linux kernel - with a GNU/Linux userspace that, in turn, also uses some of the original, closed-source Android libraries to access certain hardware like the GPU. As the Android libraries expect a different software ecosystem, e.g., a different C library called bionic, we cannot simply call the Android libraries from within a common GNU/Linux application. Instead, we need an additional software layer that translates between the Android and the common GNU/Linux world. This layer is called libhybris.
  • How Ironic: Harman Kardon’s Microsoft Cortana Speaker Is Powered by Linux
    Harman Kardon, the company recently acquired by Samsung, has developed its very own Cortana speaker, which is very similar to the Amazon Echo but featuring Microsoft’s famous digital assistant. And since Cortana is the key feature of this little device, it only makes sense for Harman Kardon to turn to Windows 10 to power the device. And yet, it looks like the so-called Harman Kardon is actually running Linux.
  • MontaVista® Launches Carrier Grade eXpress®(CGX) 2.2 Linux® for 5G and IoT at MWC 2017
  • The Numbers Article for Mobile in 2017 - All the Statistics You Could Ask For
    Mobile is the hottest industry. Banking and payments are rushing to mobile. Governments doing healthcare and education with mobile. Travel from airlines to taxis to trains and busses to hotel bookings is going mobile. Your driver's licence is migrating to the mobile phone as are your keys to your home. And all the other big tech stories from Internet of Things (IoT) to 'Big Data' analytics to Cloud computing - are all dependent on mobile. And next week we have the massive industry event in Barcelona, Mobile World Congress. My brand new TomiAhonen Almanac 2017 is now finished and is released today. So this is the perfect time to do my annual 'State of Mobile' blog of the major statistics. What are the big numbers. Lets start with reach. Yes, mobile is by far the most widely-spread communication technology humankind has ever witnessed.
  • Tizen Store Expands Its Service Coverage to 222 Countries
    The Tizen Store, as the name suggests, is the Tizen Application Store for developers to publish their free and paid for Tizen apps. In April 2015, we saw the store expand it’s coverage to include 182 countries, which was mainly for FREE apps, but we saw this as setting the foundation for providing paid for apps further down the road.

Android Leftovers