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Updated: 37 min 10 sec ago

Reddit: Is vim really that good?

1 hour 53 min ago

To say the least I'm very very sceptical. There seems to be a lot of posts of people raving about how great it is, but never really saying much, just saying that it is good and that's all you need to know. Simultaneously, it's hard to get differing opinions, There are a couple of posts showing the basic reasons why it isn't great. But they are the same arguments for why vim is great.

https://www.reddit.com/r/changemyview/comments/1h9sqe/vim_is_a_bad_text_editor_cmv/

https://yehudakatz.com/2010/07/29/everyone-who-tried-to-convince-me-to-use-vim-was-wrong/

Where some say vim is more efficient, others say vim is less efficient.

"Easier then you thought", to "it's really difficult"

Config files are great, no they are a hassle

As for me personally, I have found the mouse to be a very powerful tool, I have tried setups that exclusively use the keyboard but I keep finding the mouse to be a good secondary device not really worth giving up. I don't have RSI problems (Maintain good posture) So I even see that is a invalid excuse on why keyboard exclusively is just better.

I have tried other IDES for Java, and honestly nothing can replace eclipse from me (and no IntelliJ doesn't cut it), but I cannot find a similarly good IDE for C/C++ on Linux. I want something like visual studio IDE (not code) but alas its windows only.

Also disclaimer I haven't tried vim, but I made this post to see if it is worth spending time learning.

submitted by /u/ReadAParadox
[link] [comments]

Reddit: What do you all think of fossil version control system as opposed to git?

2 hours 17 min ago

I was going to set up a private remote version control repo for some work i do, and began to set up git. I quickly realized that you pretty much have to have a PhD in git to admin a server repository. To me, that takes away from time and energy i would rather spend actually building what i want, it shouldn't be harder to use a wrench than it is to build a car, you know what i mean?

So i went looking for alternatives, wasn't too impressed with anything until i came across fossil, maintained by the guys that make sqlite (and for the purpose of maintaining sqlite). I deployed it in a few minutes, it works, it is very very simple and powerful, but i wanted to know what some of you with a bit more experience using and administering version control systems think of it as opposed to git.

submitted by /u/monzzter221
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: Launching Open Source Initiatives Is the Next Battleground In Quantum Computing

Monday 23rd of July 2018 06:24:57 AM

At a time when tech giants are ploughing millions of dollars in quantum computing and are striving ahead with breakthroughs, Google, Microsoft and IBM seem to be locked in an intense battle of quantum supremacy. Mountain View search giant announced Cirq — an open-source framework for NISQ computers. Cirq is an open-source initiative that allows developers to create algorithms that can run on a number of machines without having a full background in quantum physics.

The Google blog notes that once installed — Cirq enables researchers to write quantum algorithms for specific quantum processors. “Cirq gives users fine-tuned control over quantum circuits, specifying gate behaviour using native gates, placing these gates appropriately on the device, and scheduling the timing of these gates within the constraints of the quantum hardware,” the blog notes. Cirq supports running these algorithms locally on a simulator and is designed to easily integrate with future quantum hardware or larger simulators via the cloud.

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TuxMachines: NetBSD Version 8.0 Released With New Features

Monday 23rd of July 2018 06:23:47 AM

NetBSD has a new major release in its 25th year. NetBSD 8.0 release brings several new features and improvements.

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TuxMachines: Openwashing

Monday 23rd of July 2018 06:17:20 AM

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TuxMachines: Review: Peppermint OS 9

Monday 23rd of July 2018 05:31:08 AM

While I have to admit that I am not the target audience for a distribution focused on web-based applications, I found Peppermint 9 to be a solid distribution. Despite pulling components from multiple desktop environments, Peppermint 9's desktop is well integrated and easy to use. It was also easy to add both web-based and traditional applications to the system, so the distribution can be adjusted for users who prefer either.

Peppermint 9 is not for everyone, but users who do most their work in Google Docs or Microsoft Office Online should give Peppermint a try. However, users accustomed to using traditional desktop applications might want to stick to one of the many alternatives out there. Yes, Peppermint 9 can be easily adjusted to use traditional desktop applications, but many of the other distribution options out there come with those kinds of applications pre-installed.

read more

TuxMachines: A Major GNOME Icon Redesign is Getting Underway

Monday 23rd of July 2018 05:25:48 AM

Your favourite GNOME applications will soon have dramatically different icons.

GNOME devs are redesigning the default icons for all GNOME core apps as part a wider overhaul of GNOME design guidelines.

The move hope to make it easier (and less effort) for app developers to provide high-quality and useful icons for their software on the GNOME desktop.

Not that this redesign is much a surprise, as the Adwaita folder icons we highlighted a few weeks back suggested a new tack was being taken on design.

With the GNOME desktop environment shipping on the Purism Librem 5 smartphone, the timing of this revamp couldn’t be better.

read more

Reddit: Why Linux? (For Servers)

Monday 23rd of July 2018 05:24:33 AM

Why do you use Linux, instead of, say, OpenBSD? From what I have read, both OpenBSD and Linux both are good for servers, but OpenBSD seems to be a better choice for them. What does Linux do better, and why would I want to use Linux for a server instead of a BSD?

Just to clarify, I'm not trolling, and I am referencing this article, which seems biased.

submitted by /u/StevenC21
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TuxMachines: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X: Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance

Monday 23rd of July 2018 05:01:17 AM

Recently there have been several Linux distribution benchmark comparisons on Phoronix to test the latest Linux OS releases, including several comparing to the current Microsoft Windows 10 performance. Those recent tests have all be done with various Intel CPUs, but for those curious about the AMD Windows vs. Linux performance, here are some fresh benchmarks as we approach the end of July.

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Reddit: Help with lvm2 pv

Monday 23rd of July 2018 04:25:35 AM

I was trying Ubuntu and I decided to install it but I didn't read really well the options and I got anxious about fucked up my data and windows installation, so I abort the process. Yeah blame for do stupid stuff and don't read before doing something ...

I restarted my computer and figured out that I erased the Mbr, well I tried to fix it using the live usb but this don't worked because the hardrive has the lvm2 pv format.

What should I do? Here is the Gparted screenshot, Yeah I'm not a big linux user :c

- I lost my data and windows installation?

- If not how could fix the mess that I did?

submitted by /u/MinaDawngate
[link] [comments]

Phoronix: AMD Ryzen 7 2700X: Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance

Monday 23rd of July 2018 04:00:01 AM
Recently there have been several Linux distribution benchmark comparisons on Phoronix to test the latest Linux OS releases, including several comparing to the current Microsoft Windows 10 performance. Those recent tests have all be done with various Intel CPUs, but for those curious about the AMD Windows vs. Linux performance, here are some fresh benchmarks as we approach the end of July.

LXer: Google Data Transfer Project will help you move your data between services

Monday 23rd of July 2018 03:36:41 AM
VIDEO: Google, together with Microsoft, Twitter, and Facebook, is introducing the open-source Data Transfer Project, which will enable consumers to transfer their data directly from one service to another.

Reddit: I think I want to get linux

Monday 23rd of July 2018 02:36:54 AM

So I have had Ubuntu in the past and liked it but I always ended up using Windows for the game support but I saw Linus video on Linux and gaming and I think I am going to go back to Linux once I make my Plex server and move over all of my movies/TV shows to it

submitted by /u/patsyl115
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Monday 23rd of July 2018 01:59:00 AM
  • NXP i.MX8 SoC Support Hasn't Yet Worked Its Way Into The Mainline Linux Kernel

    While early in the year was talk of introducing NXP i.MX8 SoC support in the Linux 4.17 kernel, that didn't happen. Support for that latest-generation i.MX SoC also didn't make it for Linux 4.18 and it also looks like it will not make it for Linux 4.19.

    There have been patches for the i.MX8 Linux SoC support since January thanks to Pengutronix with GPIO, clock, net, and the core patches being written by the German firm. But unfortunately they haven't yet made it to mainline. For the i.MX8 in the mainline kernel tree as of today with Linux 4.18 there is just the i.MX8QM AHCI SATA support, FEC network driver carried over from earlier Freescale SoCs, and some bits for the the Etnaviv DRM driver with the Vivante GC7000L graphics from the i.MX8M.

  • Microsoft Surface Dial & Dell Totem Support Heading To Linux 4.19

    Back in May we covered the big rewrite of the Linux kernel's HID multi-touch code and in the process supporting the Microsoft Surface Dial and Dell Canvas 27's Totem input device. That work will be landing in the Linux 4.19 kernel.

  • Distributed Services Fabric for Container-Based Applications Powered by Avi Network

    Avi Vantage constantly monitors several metrics that represent load on application instances. Operators can configure an autoscaling policy to automatically scale up or scale down application instances based on load. In addition, Avi Vantage also learns application access patterns and can perform intelligent, predictive autoscaling based on learnt access patterns.

    In our next blog post we will focus on the intelligence and security features that Avi Networks and OpenShift provide for container-based applications.

  • Fedora Needs Some Help If Continuing To Support The LXQt Desktop

    Fedora's LXQt desktop is at risk of being dropped if new packagers do not step up to maintain this lightweight Qt desktop environment's support.

    LXQt for Fedora right now is already outdated and in need of some adjustments for better integration into the Fedora ecosystem. But the core Fedora LXQt packager has since left and another Fedora packager who had stepped up to maintain the LXQt bits is needing to move on due to his university work.

  • GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek Sharma
  • MIUI Hidden Settings For Xiaomi Fans | Remove Bloatware From Your Mi Device
  • GNU Parallel 20180722 ('Crimson Hexagon') released [alpha]

    GNU Parallel 20180722 ('Crimson Hexagon') [alpha] has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/

    This release has significant changes and is considered alpha quality.

  • PR: With Blockchain for the Open Source Hardware – ENVIENTA

    The Hungarian rooted ENVIENTA project started its preliminary token issue on 1st July (ICO private token sale).

    The aim of the project is to help to spread the open source philosophy becoming more and more common in hardware development industry and to support the life cycle of the products, made this way, from the idea to the realization. The idea of the open source hardware is not new, however, there has been no attempt to gather all the participants in this field on a common platform in order to support cooperations.

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TuxMachines: Wine and Games: Wine-Staging 3.13, Bomber Crew, Faeria

Monday 23rd of July 2018 01:57:48 AM
  • Wine-Staging 3.13 Released With Extra Patches

    Following Friday's release of Wine 3.13 is now the adjoining Wine-Staging 3.13 version debut that incorporates various extra/testing patches atop this code-base for running Windows programs/games primarily on Linux and macOS systems.

  • Bomber Crew, the action-filled bomber sim, has gotten quite a few new features recently

    Liam covered Bomber Crew when it first came out and found that bombing the enemy from high wasn’t as easy at he thought it’d be. I’ve since played a little of the game as well and have found it to be an engaging and often wild ride, where even with a competent crew and plenty of good equipment it can be a challenge to make it home. It can be a little overwhelming during it’s action-filled missions but once you get into the groove of the game it’s a rewarding experience.

  • Card-based strategy game Faeria gets massive “2.0” update, moves away from a F2P model

    The rather engaging card battling game has recently gotten a massive new update that changes up the game significantly. Most importantly, the title is no longer free-to-play with new players having to buy into the experience.

read more

More in Tux Machines

Openwashing

Review: Peppermint OS 9

While I have to admit that I am not the target audience for a distribution focused on web-based applications, I found Peppermint 9 to be a solid distribution. Despite pulling components from multiple desktop environments, Peppermint 9's desktop is well integrated and easy to use. It was also easy to add both web-based and traditional applications to the system, so the distribution can be adjusted for users who prefer either. Peppermint 9 is not for everyone, but users who do most their work in Google Docs or Microsoft Office Online should give Peppermint a try. However, users accustomed to using traditional desktop applications might want to stick to one of the many alternatives out there. Yes, Peppermint 9 can be easily adjusted to use traditional desktop applications, but many of the other distribution options out there come with those kinds of applications pre-installed. Read more

A Major GNOME Icon Redesign is Getting Underway

Your favourite GNOME applications will soon have dramatically different icons. GNOME devs are redesigning the default icons for all GNOME core apps as part a wider overhaul of GNOME design guidelines. The move hope to make it easier (and less effort) for app developers to provide high-quality and useful icons for their software on the GNOME desktop. Not that this redesign is much a surprise, as the Adwaita folder icons we highlighted a few weeks back suggested a new tack was being taken on design. With the GNOME desktop environment shipping on the Purism Librem 5 smartphone, the timing of this revamp couldn’t be better. Read more

Linux 4.17.9, 4.14.57, 4.9.114, 4.4.143, and 3.18.116