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Updated: 10 min 29 sec ago

Reddit: Why is your favourite distro your favourite distro?

1 hour 11 min ago

I'm distrohopping at the moment and it is very interesting to see how many different distros exist and how the different communities focus on different things. There are the minimalists, the security-focused, those who want to be at the bleeding edge, etc.

When choosing a distro, you often have to make certain trade-offs. Do you want bleeding edge? Arch. But wait, you're too n00b to install Arch. Antergos... etc. etc.

I'd be interested to know which distro the users of /r/linux prefer in late 2017 and why.

submitted by /u/Un9rwNFquDqaEMA
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Reddit: Distro recommendations

1 hour 21 min ago

My mom's laptop is extremely slow on windows 10 (win 8 laptop) so I'm thinking of installing a simple version of Linux. Any suggestions?

submitted by /u/logic128
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LXer: The Best Free FPS Games For Android

1 hour 35 min ago
With the ever shining genre of First Person Shooters making it Huge in the PC market, game studios have brought the best of FPS action to people’s mobile devices. Here I present to you my best picks for the Free FPS games on Android.

Phoronix: Mir Had A Wild Year From Nearly Being Killed Alongside Unity 8 To Growing With Wayland

2 hours 30 min ago
It was a heck of a year for Ubuntu's Mir display server from it starting off as the display server to the now-abandoned Unity 8 desktop and it surviving Canonical's cancelling of the Unity/convergence projects to now not only being fitted for IoT use-cases but gaining Wayland support with hopes some will use it as a Wayland compositor. This also went from Mir 1.0 nearly being released and back to the drawing board to Canonical now hiring more Mir developers and adding Mir to other Linux distributions: what a wild ride 2017 has been for this controversial project...

Phoronix: Glibc 2.27 Lands Yet More Performance Optimizations

3 hours 10 min ago
Earlier this month I wrote how Intel engineers have been busy with continuing to tune glibc's performance with FMA and AVX optimizations. That work has continued but also other architectures continue tuning their GNU C Library performance ahead of the expected v2.27 update...

LXer: Top 5: Mining cryptocurrency, building games with Python, and more

3 hours 29 min ago
This week we look at TensorFlow and image classification, mining cryptocurrencies with the Raspberry Pi, developing your own game with Python, and more.

Phoronix: GIMP PIcks Up Support For The New Flatpak/FreeDesktop.org Screenshot API

3 hours 30 min ago
Hot off the release of the new GIMP 2.9.8 and ahead of the expected GIMP 2.10 release candidates that are expected to begin, a new addition to GIMP is a plug-in supporting the new FreeDesktop.org/Flatpak screenshot API...

Phoronix: KDE Partition Manager 3.3 Arrives With Initial LUKS2 Support

3 hours 45 min ago
KDE Partition Manager 3.3 was released this week as the newest version of this program for managing disk devices/partitions from the KDE desktop...

Phoronix: GCC Prepares For Fortran 2018 Support

3 hours 54 min ago
The Fortran committee decided last month to rename the upcoming Fortran 2015 programming language update to Fortran 2018. GCC support is being prepped...

LXer: GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Gets Third Development Snapshot, More Meson Ports

5 hours 23 min ago
GNOME leader Matthias Clasen announced a few moments ago the availability of the third development snapshot towards the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions.

TuxMachines: Mobile Linux: Tizen and Android

5 hours 53 min ago

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Reddit: So, now that we hate Firefox, which offshoot/alternative are we changing to?

5 hours 54 min ago

Hey guys!

I have a Firefox that I don't really update, and it has all the bad things disabled, along with having Ublock origin, decentraleyes, https everywhere, and self destructing cookies. So the new things don't affect me, but surely bother me.

I would like to see Mozilla pedal back and try to apologise, and change their way, but since everything in this world is going towards stealing data, making databases and selling them to third parties, I think it's safer to just switch to some popular privacy ofshoot.

There is Firefox, Waterfox, Nightly, Pale Moon, and then there is Chromium, and a bunch of others.

Can we agree on a superior one and start using it? I still kinda lean towards a Firefox offshoot, even though chromium is probably superior regarding performance...

submitted by /u/bloopblo
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TuxMachines: Security: Vista 10, Ransom, and "Zealot"

5 hours 55 min ago
  • Face Palm: Windows 10 Bundled A Password Manager That Exposed Your Saved Passwords

    bout 16 months ago, a Google Project Zero researcher found a critical bug in a password manager named Keeper. The bug allowed Keeper to inject its trusted UI into untrusted web pages with a content script. This allowed websites to steal user passwords using techniques like clickjacking.

    In a surprising development, Tavis Ormandy, the same researcher, has found that Microsoft bundled the same password manager with Windows 10. “I recently created a fresh Windows 10 VM with a pristine image from MSDN, and found that a password manager called “Keeper” is now installed by default,” he said. Moreover, a similar flaw was again found in this pre-installed password manager, which remained present for eight days.

  • British companies 'stockpile' Bitcoin to use as ransomware hush money
  • "Zealot" Campaign Uses NSA Exploits to Mine Monero on Windows and Linux Servers

    An aggressive and sophisticated malware campaign is currently underway, targeting Linux and Windows servers with an assortment of exploits with the goal of installing malware that mines the Monero cryptocurrency.

    The campaign was detected by security researchers from F5 Networks, who named it Zealot, after zealot.zip, one of the files dropped on targeted servers.

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TuxMachines: today's howtos

5 hours 56 min ago

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Reddit: Which FOSS Browsers are useable at the moment?

5 hours 59 min ago

Pretty much everyone knows about Firefox and Chromium, but what alternatives are there to those?

submitted by /u/N00byKing
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TuxMachines: FLOSSophobia

6 hours 3 min ago

I have seen it many times. "Linux is a cancer". "Open sauce". "Linuxtard". I even remember the teacher who did not bring a laptop for her presentation and, when I offered her my Linux netbook, she rejected it as if I had presented her something illegal. She tried to use an old Windows computer instead but, when the computer failed, she ended up displaying her presentation with my Linux netbook.
Clearly, this teacher's position was not based on ignorance or lack of expertise because she knew Linux existed and all she had to do was to display slides. Her refusal was due to indoctrination: she had learned that Linux and non-Microsoft office suites had to be rejected.

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More in Tux Machines

FLOSSophobia

I have seen it many times. "Linux is a cancer". "Open sauce". "Linuxtard". I even remember the teacher who did not bring a laptop for her presentation and, when I offered her my Linux netbook, she rejected it as if I had presented her something illegal. She tried to use an old Windows computer instead but, when the computer failed, she ended up displaying her presentation with my Linux netbook. Clearly, this teacher's position was not based on ignorance or lack of expertise because she knew Linux existed and all she had to do was to display slides. Her refusal was due to indoctrination: she had learned that Linux and non-Microsoft office suites had to be rejected. Read more

Today in Techrights

Hands on With elementary OS Powered Centurion Nano Laptop by Alpha Store

If you want to buy a new laptop, no doubt you should consider the Centurion line. It will be a good choice for you, Linux aficionado. As well as for your Windows-addicted husband/wife/employees. The Centurion Nano is certainly not a “gamer” laptop. However, besides that particular use case, and for an interesting price, you will get a very competent computer, 100% compatible with Linux and usable for a broad range of tasks. Read more

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.