Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linuxinsight

Syndicate content
LinuxInsight - aggregated feeds
Updated: 1 hour 3 min ago

TuxMachines: Openwashing: Zenko (Dual), Kong (Mere API) and Blackboard (Proprietary and Malicious)

1 hour 26 min ago

read more

TuxMachines: Games: Descenders, War Thunder’s “The Valkyries”

1 hour 37 min ago

read more

Reddit: Suggestion for running multiple VMs

1 hour 38 min ago

What linux can i use to run multiple VMs? Is there a linux that is built for running multiple VMs?

submitted by /u/_qwerti
[link] [comments]

LXer: Host your own cloud with Raspberry Pi NAS

1 hour 45 min ago
In the first two parts of this series, we discussed the hardware and software fundamentals for building network-attached storage (NAS) on a Raspberry Pi. We also put a proper backup strategy in place to secure the data on the NAS.read more

TuxMachines: Kernel: Virtme, 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference and Linux Foundation Articles

1 hour 55 min ago
  • Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend

    When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common. Many virtual drivers have been recently merged, useful either to test the kernel core code, or your application. These virtual drivers make QEMU even more attractive.

  • 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference

    As in previous years we’re trying to organize an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisons, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 21st in Edinburgh, the day before ELC Europe starts there.

  • How Writing Can Expand Your Skills and Grow Your Career [Ed: Linux Foundation article]

    At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, I participated in a panel discussion called How Writing can Change Your Career for the Better (Even if You don't Identify as a Writer. The panel was moderated by Rikki Endsley, Community Manager and Editor for Opensource.com, and it included VM (Vicky) Brasseur, Open Source Strategy Consultant; Alex Williams, Founder, Editor in Chief, The New Stack; and Dawn Foster, Consultant, The Scale Factory.

  • At the Crossroads of Open Source and Open Standards [Ed: Another Linux Foundation article]

    A new crop of high-value open source software projects stands ready to make a big impact in enterprise production, but structural issues like governance, IPR, and long-term maintenance plague OSS communities at every turn. Meanwhile, facing significant pressures from open source software and the industry groups that support them, standards development organizations are fighting harder than ever to retain members and publish innovative standards. What can these two vastly different philosophies learn from each other, and can they do it in time to ensure they remain relevant for the next 10 years?

read more

TuxMachines: Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

1 hour 58 min ago
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions

    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.

  • Security Embargos at Red Hat

    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them.

    When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.

  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards

    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.

read more

Reddit: New to Linux

2 hours 2 min ago

I just installed Linux because Then I would look cool to fellow coders. So I m just wondering is there some place where I can find some like intro documents and stuff? Also it seems like I cannot install iTunes on linux, or I might just be retarded.

submitted by /u/richardses0608
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: BlackArch Linux Ethical Hacking OS Now Has More Than 2000 Hacking Tools

2 hours 21 min ago

The BlackArch Linux penetration testing and ethical hacking computer operating system now has more than 2000 tools in its repositories, announced the project's developers recently.

Used by thousands of hundreds of hackers and security researchers all over the world, BlackArch Linux is one of the most acclaimed Linux-based operating systems for hacking and other security-related tasks. It has its own software repositories that contain thousands of tools.

The OS is based on the famous Arch Linux operating system and follows a rolling release model, where users install once and receive updates forever, or at least until they do something that can't be repaired and need to reinstall.

read more

TuxMachines: Debian Patches for Intel's Defects, Canonical to Fix Ubuntu Security Flaws for a Fee

2 hours 23 min ago
  • Debian Outs Updated Intel Microcode to Mitigate Spectre V4 and V3a on More CPUs

    The Debian Project released an updated Intel microcode firmware for users of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series to mitigate two of the latest Spectre vulnerabilities on more Intel CPUs.

    Last month, on August 16, Debian's Moritz Muehlenhoff announced the availability of an Intel microcode update that provided Speculative Store Bypass Disable (SSBD) support needed to address both the Spectre Variant 4 and Spectre Variant 3a security vulnerabilities.

    However, the Intel microcode update released last month was available only for some types of Intel CPUs, so now the Debian Project released an updated version that implements SSBD support for additional Intel CPU models to mitigate both Spectre V4 and V3a on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" systems.

  • Announcing Extended Security Maintenance for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – “Trusty Tahr” [Ed: Canonical looking to profit from security flaws in Ubuntu like Microsoft does in Windows.]

    Ubuntu is the basis for the majority of cloud-based workloads today. With over 450 million public cloud instances launched since the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, a number that keeps accelerating on a day-per-day basis since, many of the largest web-scale deployments are using Ubuntu. This includes financial, big data, media, and many other workloads and use cases, which rely on the stability and continuity of the underlying operating system to provide the mission-critical service their customers rely on.

    Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) was introduced for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS as a way to extend the availability of critical and important security patches beyond the nominal End of Life date of Ubuntu 12.04. Organisations use ESM to address security compliance concerns while they manage the upgrade process to newer versions of Ubuntu under full support. The ability to plan application upgrades in a failsafe environment continues to be cited as the main value for adoption of ESM. With the End of Life of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS in April 2019, and to support the planning efforts of developers worldwide, Canonical is announcing the availability of ESM for Ubuntu 14.04.

  • Canonical Announces Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) Extended Security Maintenance

    Canonical announced today that it would extend its commercial Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) offering to the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series starting May 2019.

    Last year on April 28, 2017, when the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system series reached end of life, Canonical announced a new way for corporate users and enterprises to receive security updates if they wanted to keep their current Ubuntu 12.04 LTS installations and had no plans to upgrade to a newer LTS (Long Term Support) release. The offering was called Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) and had a great success among businesses.

read more

Phoronix: Initial NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux Benchmarks

3 hours 57 min ago
Here are the first of many benchmarks of the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti "Turing" graphics card under Linux with this initial piece exploring the OpenGL/Vulkan gaming performance.

LXer: How to Manually Mount/UnMount a USB Device on Ubuntu

4 hours 14 min ago
In this tutorial, we will explain how to manually mount and unmount a USB drive to and from your system by using the Terminal. The commands and steps described in this article have been run on an Ubuntu 18.04 LTS system.

Reddit: [Discussion] is dm-verity actually possible on desktops?

4 hours 45 min ago

I've seen this technology being used in Android devices, but I've never seen it in an actual Linux machine. Is anyone here using it? If so, how was your experience?

The only mention about it that I could find is in the cryptsetup documentation: https://gitlab.com/cryptsetup/cryptsetup/wikis/DMVerity

submitted by /u/TheProgrammar89
[link] [comments]

LinuxToday: How to Run Commands Simultaneously in Linux

5 hours 1 min ago

Let's say you're editing a configuration file in the Linux vi editor, and suddenly need to look up some data in another file..

Reddit: Substituting Linux+ for Exp

5 hours 5 min ago

I know experience is more important than certs, and Linux+ is an entry level certification. However, since I'm diving more into AWS/DevOps it's become clear that knowing Linux is a requirement.

So I'm wondering, I have experience as a sysadmin with windows but no professional experience with linux, is it a good idea to just got for Linux+? I've already started and I feel like it's giving me a good top level view of linux and if anyone's been in the same boat.

submitted by /u/top_kek_top
[link] [comments]

Reddit: A brief history lesson from an old fart

5 hours 28 min ago

I'm old and have been using Linux since 1993. Heck, I've been on Reddit for 12 years, which is hard to believe some days. Since an interesting post was removed by the mods while I researched and composed this comment, I figured I'd just post it here.

Here are some fun facts that you may not know.

In 1993, Microsoft released Windows NT and Slackware came out. Slackware remained my preferred distro until I switched to Debian after the great libc5/glibc wars in 1998.

David N. Cutler, who had been designing operating systems for Digital Equipment Corporation, brought his team over to Microsoft in 1988 and designed what would become Windows NT. The VMS->WNT (one letter up) may be a coincidence, but it's still funny.

That initial version of Windows NT Server ran on multiple hardware platforms and eventually supported Intel x86 and Itanium, DEC Alpha, ARC MIPS, IBM PowerPC, and Sun Sparc. It was promoted at the time as a universal operating system that would unify the market providing a single software development platform for everyone. They even helped create industry certifications to leapfrog the slow adoption of new technologies in universities with the Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer in 1993. Personal fun fact: I was one of the first 3000 people to be certified on Windows NT 3.51.

At the same time, my Slackware version ran only on x86. It took until 1995 for Linux to gain support for DEC Alpha and SUN Sparc architectures. During that time I watched Microsoft squander their technology lead with petty games and faltering missteps.

Linux now runs on a vast array of hardware architectures, from supercomputers to watches. In June 1998, the first computer running Linux appeared on the list of the top 500 fastest computers in the world. Since November 2017, all 500 computers on the top list run some version of Linux.

I had an IT manager ask me in 1998 how could I believe Linux could ever compete with Microsoft. I boldly predicted Linux had already won. Like a tree after that final chop, we were all just waiting for gravity to take its inevitable toll. I was personally waiting for the perennial gale of creative destruction to clear the whole the field. I think we bet $20 at the time on the result. Considering it's been twenty years, I should probably give him a call and see if he wants to pay up or double down.

submitted by /u/DaGoodBoy
[link] [comments]

LXer: Opt out of global data surveillance programs

5 hours 28 min ago
"Help make mass surveillance of entire populations uneconomical! We all have a right to privacy, which you can exercise today by encrypting your communications and ending your reliance on proprietary services."

LinuxToday: Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend

6 hours 1 min ago

When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common.

Reddit: Video library

6 hours 21 min ago

If this is the wrong channel to post this in, please let me know. :)

I'm currently using libgstreamer for my front-end (RetroFE) development, but I'm running into video stuttering issues on both Windows and Linux. Most of the time it's working fine, but from time to time the video starts stuttering (skipping 1-3 seconds worth of frames) while the audio continues just fine. The CPU is hardly being used (the front-end really doesn't ask that much of the system), and nothing important (other than X and KDE for Linux and bare Windows for Windows 10) are running at the time. I've tried several Google searches, but I haven't found anything recent that matches my issues. Have more people run into this problem, and is it worth trying to solve or would it be easier for me to just switch video libraries? In that last case, which cross-platform video library would you suggest?

submitted by /u/phulshof
[link] [comments]

More in Tux Machines

Openwashing: Zenko (Dual), Kong (Mere API) and Blackboard (Proprietary and Malicious)

Games: Descenders, War Thunder’s “The Valkyries”

Kernel: Virtme, 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference and Linux Foundation Articles

  • Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend
    When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common. Many virtual drivers have been recently merged, useful either to test the kernel core code, or your application. These virtual drivers make QEMU even more attractive.
  • 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference
    As in previous years we’re trying to organize an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisons, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 21st in Edinburgh, the day before ELC Europe starts there.
  • How Writing Can Expand Your Skills and Grow Your Career [Ed: Linux Foundation article]
    At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, I participated in a panel discussion called How Writing can Change Your Career for the Better (Even if You don't Identify as a Writer. The panel was moderated by Rikki Endsley, Community Manager and Editor for Opensource.com, and it included VM (Vicky) Brasseur, Open Source Strategy Consultant; Alex Williams, Founder, Editor in Chief, The New Stack; and Dawn Foster, Consultant, The Scale Factory.
  • At the Crossroads of Open Source and Open Standards [Ed: Another Linux Foundation article]
    A new crop of high-value open source software projects stands ready to make a big impact in enterprise production, but structural issues like governance, IPR, and long-term maintenance plague OSS communities at every turn. Meanwhile, facing significant pressures from open source software and the industry groups that support them, standards development organizations are fighting harder than ever to retain members and publish innovative standards. What can these two vastly different philosophies learn from each other, and can they do it in time to ensure they remain relevant for the next 10 years?

Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.