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SparkyLinux

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Updated: 17 hours 36 min ago

What’s next Sparky?

Saturday 20th of July 2019 06:18:24 PM

As before, after releasing a new stable version of Sparky, there are a few changes to do.

So…

Sparky 4 “Tyche” is moved to oldstable line now.
The latest 4.11 release is the last one of the 4 line, but it is still supported, the next 2 years about.

Sparky 5 “Nibiru” just released, moving it from testing to stable line.
The stable live/install media are available for i686, amd64 & armhf archs (the same as the older release).

The present rolling line is based on Debian testing “bullseye” and…
• new iso images will be published for amd64 arch only (rolling only)
• according to Debian’s support of 32 bit packages, Sparky also supports the i386 repo and packs, so if you have Sparky i686 installed, simply keep it updating
• new iso images of Sparky rolling change their version’s number from a static one to a date, such as: YYYY.MM; it makes much more clear which one is stable (static number), and which one is rolling (date); so Sparky 6.0 will be published as a next stable release in about 2 years (after Bullseye become stable)
• next Sparky 6 code name is “Po Tolo” – it follows Sparky’s code names of planets

What does the “Po Tolo” mean?
In the language of the African Dogon tribe, “Po Tolo” means Sirius B.

From Wikibooks (PL):

The Dogon believe that they come from the space and landed to the accompaniment of roars and flames on a side of Lake Debo. They believe that they come from the star of Sirius B – a white dwarf star located near the Sirius A, which is the brightest star in the sky. Dogoni named the Sirius A – Sigi Tolo, and Sirius B – Po Tolo… …it was not known until the nineteenth century that astronomers in Europe assumed the existence of Sirius B, and its discovery took place in 1970.

Sparky 5.8 “Nibiru”

Wednesday 17th of July 2019 01:02:59 PM

There are new live/install media of SparkyLinux 5.8 “Nibiru” available to download.
This is the 1st release of the new stable line, which is based on the Debian 10 “Buster”.

Changes:
– based on Debian 10 stable “Buster” now, repositories changed from ‘testing’ to ‘stable’
– system upgraded from Debian stable “Buster” repos as of July 14, 2019
– Linux kernel 4.19.37-5 (i686 & amd64)
– Linux kernel 4.19.57-v7+ (ARMHF)
– the Calamares installer updated up to version 3.2.11
– apt-daily.service disabled
– sparky-tube installed as dafault
– removed old 3rd party repositories
– added obconf-qt (LXQt edition)
– nm-tray installed instead of network-manager-gnome (LXQt edition)
– network-manager added to CLI ARMHF image
– small fixes

System reinstallation is not required. If you have Sparky 5.x installed, make sure your OS uses Debian’s ‘buster’ or ‘stable’ repos and make full system upgrade:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install sparky5-apt
sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade

Sparky 5.8 is available in the following flavors:
– amd64 & i686: LXQt, Xfce, MinimalGUI (Openbox) & MinimalCLI (text mode)
– armhf: Openbox & CLI (text mode)

New stable iso/img images can be downloaded from the download/stable page.

Changing the repositories moves Sparky 5 from ‘rolling’ to ‘stable’ line now.
If you would like to keep Sparky rolling, read the post: https://sparkylinux.org/sparky-5-transition/

Sparky 4.11

Wednesday 10th of July 2019 09:05:25 AM

New live/install iso/img images of Sparky 4.11 are out.

Sparky 4.11 “Tyche” is the last release of the 4 line which moves the base system from Debian stable “Stretch” to Debian oldstable “Stretch”.

Make sure that Sparky 4 will be supported next 2 years about, so if you keep running your machine with Sparky 4, do regular system upgrade.

Changes:
• all packages upgraded from Debian & Sparky ‘oldstable’ repos as of 2019/July/09
• fixed root password at armhf images (toor)
• added network-manager (nmtui) to armhf-cli image

No need to reinstall your existing Sparky 4 installation.

Make full system upgrade as follow:
Check is your system uses ‘stretch’ repos at the /etc/apt/sources.list , then:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install sparky4-apt
sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade

Sparky 4 iso/img images can be downloaded from the download/oldstable page.

Linux kernel 5.2

Monday 8th of July 2019 04:39:48 PM

 

The first release of Linux kernel of the new 5.2 line just landed in Sparky “unstable” repository.

Build status:
– amd64 – build and installed OK -> uploaded
– 686-pae – build and installed OK -> uploaded

The Sparky’s Linux kernel is available in Sparky “unstable” repository, so enabled it to upgrade (if you have older version already installed) or to make fresh installation:
https://sparkylinux.org/wiki/doku.php/repository

Follow the Wiki page: https://sparkylinux.org/wiki/doku.php/linux_kernel to install the latest Sparky’s Linux kernel.

Then reboot your machine to take effects.

To quick remove older version of the Linux kernel, simply run APTus-> System-> Uninstall Old Kernel tool.

 

Sparky 5 transition

Sunday 7th of July 2019 08:07:11 PM

Sparky 5 based on Debian 10 “Buster” has been moved to the new stable line now.

What you should do now?

1. Check Debian repositories to make sure your OS uses ‘buster’ (or ‘stable’) repos at the /etc/apt/sources.list

2. Sparky 5 automatically changes its own repositories from testing to stable, by upgrading the ‘sparky5-apt’ package:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install sparky-apt sparky5-apt

3. Then make full system upgrade:
sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade

Sparky Upgrade Tool should install the latest ‘sparky5-apt’ package before performing the system upgrade, but if it doesn’t, close the Upgrade Tool and do it manually in a terminal emulator, as above.

If you would like to keep using the rolling edition based on Debian testing:
1. Check Debian repositories to make sure your OS uses ‘testing’ repos at the /etc/apt/sources.list
2. Temporary change Sparky repos from ‘stable’ to ‘testing’ at the /etc/apt/sources.d/sparky-stable.list if your system uses Sparky ‘stable’ repos already, and refresh package list:
sudo apt update
3. Install the latest version of the following packages: ‘sparky-apt’, ‘sparky6-apt’, ‘sparky-core’; the ‘sparky5-apt’ package has to be removed.
sudo apt install sparky-apt sparky6-apt sparky-core
4. Then make full system upgrade:
sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade

Let me know if you find any problem with upgrading your Sparky installation, please.

Sparky 4 transition

Sunday 7th of July 2019 02:42:51 PM

Sparky 4 based on Debian 9 “Stretch” has been moved from stable to oldstable line now and is still supported.

What you should do now?

If you would like to keep Sparky 4 based on Stretch, you have to:
1. Check Debian repositories to make sure your os uses ‘stretch’ repos, at the /etc/apt/sources.list
2. Install the latest version of ‘sparky4-apt’ package which points to Sparky oldstable repos now:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install sparky-apt sparky4-apt
3. Then make system upgrade:
sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade

Sparky Upgrade Tool should install the latest ‘sparky4-apt’ package before performing the system upgrade, but if it doesn’t, close the Upgrade Tool and do it manually in a terminal emulator, as above.

More info about Sparky Oldstable repositories can be found at the Wiki page: repository_oldstable

If you would like to upgrade Sparky 4 to Sparky 5 – it is possible, but I recommend to make fresh Sparky 5 installation.
By the way, if you decide to make such upgrade, do:
1. Change Debian repos from ‘stretch’ to ‘buster’ or keep ‘stable’ at the /etc/apt/sources.list
2. Temporary change Sparky repos from ‘oldstable’ to ‘stable’ at the /etc/apt/sources.d/sparky-oldstable.list if your system uses Sparky ‘oldstable’ repos already, and refresh package list:
sudo apt update
3. Install the latest version of ‘sparky5-apt’ package which has to remove ‘sparky4-apt’:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install sparky-apt sparky5-apt
4. Then upgrade the system:
sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade
If any problem:
sudo apt install -f

Let me know if you find any problem with your system upgrade, please.

 

June 2019 donation report

Monday 1st of July 2019 07:18:00 PM

Many thanks to all of you for supporting our open-source projects!
Your donations help keeping them alive.

Don’t forget to send a small tip in July too, please

Sparky news 2019/06

Sunday 30th of June 2019 06:39:00 PM

The 6th monthly report of 2019 of the Sparky project:

• Sparky 5.8 RC based on Debian testing Buster has been released
• Linux kernel updated up to version 5.1.15 & 5.2-rc7
• added to repos: Baka-MPlayer, Atom editor
• preparations to next Sparky stable 5 “Nibiru” are on the way
• Sparky 5.8 RC2 ARMHF for RaspberryPi is out and ready for testing

 

Sparky 5.8 RC2 ARMHF

Sunday 30th of June 2019 09:50:37 AM

New images of Sparky 5.8 RC2 for RaspberryPi are ready to go. Sparky 5.8 RC is a release candidate and is based on upcoming Debian stable Buster.

The ARMHF images are available in two flavours:
• CLI – a text based OS only, so you can configure the system in your way
• Openbox – graphical version with the Openbox window manager and a few pre-installed applications

Known issues:
– Openbox edition: the Openbox starts, but other tools (panel, wallpaper, network manager, audio applet, etc.) could not start at first time; if so, wait 2 minutes about to let one of my scripts works and simply reboot (an active network connection required!)

Please test the new images and report whatever you find.
The 5.8 release candidate iso/img images can be downloaded from the download/development page.

Edit 2019/07/01:
Image 5.8 RC3 fixed the above problem, but the first Openbox loading can be a little longer than normal.

Sparky 5.8 RC

Wednesday 5th of June 2019 09:40:27 AM

New live/install iso images of Sparky 5.8 RC are out. Sparky 5.8 RC is a release candidate of the next stable line and is based on upcoming Debian stable Buster.

Changes between Sparky 5.7.x and 5.8 RC:
• Debian repo set to buster now, not to testing
• Sparky repo still points to testing, and will be updated automatically soon
• usrmerge set dirs symlinks (can be removed after)
• added inxi tool to all iso images
• all packages updated from Debian Buster repos as of July 3, 2019
• due to a few feedbacks I got, some of you are not happy with switching from LXDE to LXQt edition, so there is the Xfce edition re-built and ready to use
• due to problem with sparky5 theme in the Xfce edition, a new sparky6 theme is set as default (Xfce only)
• many Sparky apps have gotten Russian translations, thank’s to ChourS
• Calamares updated up to 3.2.9
• Firefox replaced by Firefox ESR

Please test the new iso images and report whatever you find.
The 5.8 release candidate iso images can be downloaded from the download/development page.

May 2019 donation report

Saturday 1st of June 2019 04:07:38 PM

Many thanks to all of you for supporting our open-source projects!
Your donations help keeping them alive.

Don’t forget to send a small tip in June too, please

Sparky news 2019/05

Friday 31st of May 2019 08:35:47 PM

The 5th monthly report of 2019 of the Sparky project:

• Sparky 4.10 based on Debian stable Stretch has been released
• Linux kernel updated up to version 5.1.6 & 5.0.20 & 5.2-rc2
• Lumina Desktop 1.5.0 re-compiled on Buster/Sparky5 and works fine so moved back to Sparky testing repos; Sparky 4 still uses Lumina 1.4; the Lumina been also put back to APTus and Sparky Advanced Installer
• added to repos: Draco Desktop (a fork of Lumina), QtFM file manager

 

QtFM

Thursday 30th of May 2019 07:24:14 PM

There is a new tool available for Sparkers: QtFM

What is QtFM?

Lightweight desktop independent Qt file manager for Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD and macOS.

Features:
– XDG integration
– Customizable interface
– Powerful custom command system
– Customizable key bindings
– Drag & drop functionality
– Tabs support
– Removable storage support
– System tray daemon
– Extensive thumbnail support

Installation:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install qtfm
The package is built and tested on Sparky 5/Debian Buster 64 and 32 bit only.

Make sure this is the first build of QtFM on Sparky so let me know if you find any problem, please.

The QtFM GitHub page: github.com/rodlie/qtfm
The project developes: Ole-André Rodlie, Michal Rost, Wittfella; it is licensed under the GNU GPL-2.

 

Draco Desktop

Thursday 23rd of May 2019 06:21:00 PM

There is a new desktop available for Sparkers: Draco

What is Draco?

Draco is a simple and lightweight desktop environment. While small still features XDG integration, freedesktop services and integration, power and storage management, desktop, panels, multi-monitor support and much more. Draco does not include any user applications.

Installation:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install draco-desktop
The package is built and tested on Sparky 5/Debian Buster 64 and 32 bit only.

Make sure this is the first build of Draco on Sparky so let me know if you find any problem, please.

The Draco GitHub page: github.com/rodlie/draco
The project developer is Ole-André; it is licensed under the BSD-3, LGPL-2.1 and GPL-2.

 

Linux kernel 5.1

Monday 6th of May 2019 03:19:26 PM

 

The first release of Linux kernel of the new 5.1 line just landed in Sparky “unstable” repository.

Build status:
– amd64 – build and installed OK -> uploaded
– 686-pae – build and installed OK -> uploaded

The Sparky’s Linux kernel is available in Sparky “unstable” repository, so enabled it to upgrade (if you have older version already installed) or to make fresh installation:
https://sparkylinux.org/wiki/doku.php/repository

Follow the Wiki page: https://sparkylinux.org/wiki/doku.php/linux_kernel to install the latest Sparky’s Linux kernel.

Then reboot your machine to take effects.

To quick remove older version of the Linux kernel, simply run APTus-> System-> Uninstall Old Kernel tool.

 

Sparky 4.10

Friday 3rd of May 2019 11:18:08 AM

New live/install images of SparkyLinux 4.10 “Tyche” are available to download.
Sparky 4 is based on Debian stable line of “Stretch”.

Sparky 4.10 offers a fully featured operating system with a lightweight LXDE desktop environment; and minimal images of MinimalGUI (Openbox) and MinimalCLI (text mode) which lets you install the base system with a desktop of your choice with a minimal set of applications, via the Sparky Advanced Installer.

Sparky 4.10 armhf offers a fully featured operating system for single board mini computers RaspberryPi; with the Openbox window manager as default; and a minimal, text mode CLI image to customize it as you like.

No big changes, new images feature security updates and small improvements, such as:
– full system upgrade from Debian stable Stretch repos as of May 2, 2019
– Linux kernel 4.9.168 (PC)
– Linux kernel 4.14.98 (ARM)

There is no need to reinstall existing Sparky installations of 4.x line, simply make full system upgrade. Make sure you have ‘sparky-apt’ & ‘sparky4-apt’ packages installed, before performing the full upgrade.

Sparky PC:
user: live
password: live
root password is empty

Sparky ARM:
user: pi
password: sparky
root password: toor

New iso/zip images of the stable edition can be downloaded from the download/stable page.

April 2019 donation report

Wednesday 1st of May 2019 06:44:20 PM

Many thanks to all of you for supporting our open-source projects!
Your donations help keeping them alive.

Don’t forget to send a small tip in the May too, please

Sparky news 2019/04

Tuesday 30th of April 2019 06:09:04 PM

The 4th monthly report of 2019 of the Sparky project:

• added to repos: alacritty, qt-fsarchiver, strawberry
• Sparky group has been activated at MeWe by lami07, so welcome everybody if you’d like to join us
• Linux kernel updated up to version 5.0.10 & 5.1-rc7
• Sparky 4.10 is on the way, stay tuned
• new Lumina Desktop 1.5.0 popped up so should be build soon on Buster

 

Strawberry

Monday 22nd of April 2019 04:27:35 PM

There is a new tool available for Sparkers: Strawberry

What is Strawberry?

Strawberry is a music player and music collection organizer. It is a fork of Clementine released in 2018 aimed at music collectors, audio enthusiasts and audiophiles. The name is inspired by the band Strawbs. It’s based on a heavily modified version of Clementine created in 2012-2013. It’s written in C++ and Qt 5.

Installation:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install strawberry
or via the Sparky APTus (with Sparky APTus Extra >= 0.2.16).
The tool is available for Sparky 4/Debian Stretch and Sparky 5/Debian Buster.

The Stawberry GitHub page: github.com/jonaski/strawberry
The project developer is Jonas Kvinge; it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v3.0

 

qt-fsarchiver

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 12:59:37 PM

There is a new tool available for Sparkers: qt-fsarchiver

What is qt-fsarchiver?

Back up and restore partitions for Debian,Ubuntu, Linux-Mint, Suse and Fedora. qt-fsarchiver a program with a Qt based graphical interface for easy operation the archiving program fsarchiver. qt-fsarchiver has been split into a program with a graphical user interface and a terminal program.

Installation:
If you have a deb package of qt-fsarchive downloaded from the project page and installed – uninstall it before installing a new one from Sparky repos:
sudo apt purge qt-fsarchiver qt4-fsarchiver qt5-fsarchiver
sudo apt update
sudo apt install qt-fsarchiver
or via the latest version of Sparky APTus 0.4.18.
The tool is available for Sparky 4/Debian Stretch and Sparky 5/Debian Buster 32 and 64 bit.
Let me know if you find any problem with installation or using the new tool, please.

The qt-fsarchiver project page: github.com/DieterBaum/qt-fsarchiver
Copyright (C) 2008-2018 Francois Dupoux and Dieter Baum; it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v3.0

 

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #35

    Hello and welcome to this week's Linux Roundup and what a wonderful week we had! We have plenty of Linux Distro releases and LibreOffice 6.3 RC1. The Linux distros with releases this week are Q4OS 3.8, SparkyLinux 5.8, Mageia 7.1, ArcoLinux 19.07.11, Deepin 15.11, ArchBang 2107-beta, Bluestar 5.2.1, Slackel 7.2 "Openbox" and Endeavour OS 2019.07.15. I looked at most of these Linux Distros, links below, I will look at some of them in the new week and some I will unfortunately not have a look at, for download links and more, please visit distrowatch.com Well, this is this week's Linux Roundup, thank you so much for your time! Have a great week!

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #140
  • Christopher Allan Webber: ActivityPub Conf 2019

    That's right! We're hosting the first ever ActivityPub Conf. It's immediately following Rebooting Web of Trust in Prague. There's no admission fee to attend. (Relatedly, the conference is kind of being done on the cheap, because it is being funded by organizers who are themselves barely funded.) The venue, however, is quite cool: it's at the DOX Centre for Contemporary Art, which is itself exploring the ways the digital world is affecting our lives. If you plan on attending (and maybe also speaking), you should get in your application soon (see the flier for details). We've never done one of these, and we have no idea what the response will be like, so this is going to be a smaller gathering (about 40 people). In some ways, it will be somewhere between a conference and a gathering of people-who-are-interested-in-activitypub. As said in the flier, by attending, you are agreeing to the code of conduct, so be sure to read that.

Sysadmin Appreciation Day, IBM and Fedora

  • Gift ideas for Sysadmin Appreciation Day

    Sysadmin Appreciation Day is coming up this Friday, July 26. To help honor sysadmins everywhere, we want you to share your best gift ideas. What would be the best way a team member or customer could show their appreciation for you? As a sysadmin, what was the best gift you've ever received? We asked our writers the same question, and here are their answers: "Whilst working in the Ubuntu community on Edubuntu, I took it upon myself to develop the startup/shutdown sound scheme, which became the default in Ubuntu for, from what I can understand, the next decade. Whilst people had a love-hate relationship with my sound scheme, and rightly so, I had a love-hate relationship with my sound card during the development. At the time I had recorded all my sound samples using one sample rate, but my new sound card, as my motherboard had exploded a few days earlier, did not support it. I had two choices, resample all my samples (which I didn't really want to do) or buy a new sound card.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform with Red Hat Ceph Storage: Radosbench baseline performance evaluation

    Red Hat Ceph Storage is popular storage for Red Hat OpenStack Platform. Customers around the world run their hyperscale, production workloads on Red Hat Ceph Storage and Red Hat OpenStack Platform. This is driven by the high level of integration between Ceph storage and OpenStack private cloud platforms. With each release of both platforms, the level of integration has grown and performance and automation has increased. As the customer's storage and compute needs for footprints have grown, we have seen more interest towards running compute and storage as one unit and providing a hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) layer based on OpenStack and Ceph. [...] Continuing the benchmarking series, in the next post you’ll learn performance insights of running multi-instance MySQL database on Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage across decoupled and hyperconverged architectures. We’ll also compare results from a near-equal environment backed by all-flash cluster nodes.

  • The State of Java in Flathub

    For maintainers of Java-based applications in Flathub, it's worth noting that even if you consume the Latest OpenJDK extension in your application, users will not be broken by major updates because OpenJDK is bundled into your Flatpak. The implication of this for users is that they won't see updates to their Java version until the application maintainer rebuilds the application in Flathub. If you maintain a Java-based Flatpak application on Flathub, you can consume the latest version of your chosen OpenJDK stream (either LTS or Latest) simply by rebuilding; the latest version of that OpenJDK steam will be pulled in automatically.

  • Fedora Magazine: Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for kernel 5.2

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.1. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, Jul 22, 2019 through Monday, Jul 29, 2019. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Bootstrappable Debian BoF

    Greetings from DebConf 19 in Curitiba! Just a quick reminder that I will run a Bootstrappable Debian BoF on Tuesday 23rd, at 13.30 Brasilia time (which is 16.30 UTC, if I am not mistaken). If you are curious about bootstrappability in Debian, why do we want it and where we are right now, you are welcome to come in person if you are at DebCon or to follow the streaming.

  • Candy Tsai: Outreachy Week 6 – Week 7: Getting Code Merge

    You can’t overhear what others are doing or learn something about your colleagues through gossip over lunch break when working remotely. So after being stuck for quite a bit, terceiro suggested that we try pair programming. After our first remote pair programming session, I think there should be no difference in pair programming in person. We shared the same terminal, looked at the same code and discussed just like people standing side by side. Through our pair programming session, I found out that I had a bad habit. I didn’t run tests on my code that often, so when I had failing tests that didn’t fail before, I spent more time debugging than I should have. Pair programming gave insight to how others work and I think little improvements go a long way.

  • about your wiki page on I/O schedulers and BFQ
    Hi,
    this is basically to report outdated statements in your wiki page on
    I/O schedulers [1].
    
    The main problematic statement is that BFQ "...  is not ideal for
    devices with slow CPUs or high throughput I/O devices" because too
    heavy.  BFQ is definitely more sophisticated than any of the other I/O
    schedulers.  We have designed it that way to provide an incomparably
    better service quality, at a very low overhead.  As reported in [2],
    the execution time of BFQ on an old laptop CPU is 0.6 us per I/O
    event, against 0.2 us for mq-deadline (which is the lightest Linux I/O
    scheduler).
    
    To put these figures into context, BFQ proved to be so good for
    "devices with slow CPUs" that, e.g., Chromium OS migrated to BFQ a few
    months ago.  In particular, Google crew got convinced by a demo [3] I
    made for them, on one of the cheapest and slowest Chromebook on the
    market.  In the demo, a fast download is performed.  Without BFQ, the
    download makes the device completely unresponsive.  With BFQ, the
    device remains as responsive as if it was totally idle.
    
    As for the other part of the statement, "...  not ideal for ...  high
    throughput I/O devices", a few days ago I ran benchmarks (on Ubuntu)
    also with one of the fastest consumer-grade NVMe SSDs: a Samsung SSD
    970 PRO.  Results [4] can be summarized as follows.  Throughput with
    BFQ is about the same as with the other I/O schedulers (it couldn't be
    higher, because this kind of drives just wants the scheduler to stay
    as aside as possible, when it comes to throughput).  But, in the
    presence of writes as background workload, start-up times with BFQ are
    at least 16 times as low as with the other I/O schedulers.  In
    absolute terms, gnome-terminal starts in ~1.8 seconds with BFQ, while
    it takes at least 28.7 (!) seconds with the other I/O schedulers.
    Finally, only with BFQ, no frame gets lost in video-playing
    benchmarks.
    
    BFQ then provides other important benefits, such as from 5x to 10X
    throughput boost in multi-client server workloads [5].
    
    So, is there any chance that the outdated/wrong information on your
    wiki page [1] gets updated somehow?  If I may, I'd be glad to update
    it myself, after providing you with all the results you may ask.
    
    In addition, why doesn't Ubuntu too consider switching to BFQ as
    default I/O scheduler, for all drives that BFQ supports (namely all
    drives with a maximum speed not above ~500 KIOPS)?
    
    Looking forward to your feedback,
    Paolo
    
    
  • Should Ubuntu Use The BFQ I/O Scheduler?

    The BFQ I/O scheduler is working out fairly well these days as shown in our benchmarks. The Budget Fair Queueing scheduler supports both throughput and low-latency modes while working particularly well for consumer-grade hardware. Should the Ubuntu desktop be using BFQ by default? [...] But in addition to wanting to correct that Wiki information, Paolo pops the question of why doesn't Ubuntu switch to BFQ as the default I/O scheduler for supported drives. Though as of yet, no Ubuntu kernel developers have yet commented on the prospect of switching to BFQ.

Devices With Linux Support

  • Quest Releases KACE SDA & SMA Updates

    The update to 7.0 for KACE Systems Deployment Appliance is primarily about bringing a scope of endpoint management capabilities with new support for Linux devices to the table.

  • Rugged, Kaby Lake transport computer has a 10-port LAN switch with PoE

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready “tBOX400-510-FL” transportation system has a 7th Gen Intel CPU and a 10-port managed switch with 8x M12-style 10/100Mbps PoE and 2x GbE ports. The rugged system also has 3x mini-PCIe slots and dual swappable SATA drives. Axiomtek has launched a fanless, Kaby Lake-U based transportation computer with a choice of power supplies designed for in-vehicle, marine, or railway applications. The rugged tBOX400-510-FL features a Qualcomm-driven, Layer 2 managed PoE switch with support for IP surveillance and video management applications. “Customers can connect IP cameras directly without installing an extra PoE switch, minimizing overall deployment costs and installation space onboard,” stated Axiomtek product manager Sharon Huang.