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Updated: 6 hours 32 min ago

The best free and open-source alternatives to Google Keep on Android

Monday 17th of February 2020 07:03:18 PM

While it might be difficult to switch away from feature-packed products like Gmail and Google Maps, there are thankfully plenty of competitors to Google Keep. After all, you don’t need millions of data points and industry-leading artificial intelligence to make a note-taking app. In this post, we’ll be checking out some free and open-source alternatives to Google Keep, some of which even have cloud sync.

Nextcloud Notes: It’s a server application that lets you set up your own cloud storage, and with the help of some plugins, you can essentially have your own suite of Google service alternatives. Case in point: if you set up a NextCloud instance and install the free Notes extension, you get a self-hosted clone of Google Keep that you can access from the web.

[Source: Android Police]

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Free From Epic Games Exclusivity, ‘Metro Exodus’ Is Coming To Linux

Monday 17th of February 2020 07:03:14 PM

First the good news. As of Valentine’s Day 2020, Metro Exodus has been liberated from its Epic Games exclusivity agreement and is now available to purchase on Steam. And now the great news, especially for my regular readers: it looks like Deep Silver and developer 4A Games are working on bringing the post-apocalyptic shooter to Linux.

While many Linux gamers appreciate the availability of a native version, Metro Exodus already runs on Linux thanks to “Proton,” a collaboration between CodeWeavers and Valve. “Proton” is a compatibility layer that’s built-in to the Steam for Linux client that allows literally thousands of Windows-exclusive games to be installed and played in the same way as the Steam for Windows client. No messing with Wine, no terminal tweaking.

[Source: Forbes]

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Simplicity Does More Than Simplify Linux

Monday 17th of February 2020 07:03:05 PM

If you want a new Linux distro catering to gaming, check out the Simplicity Linux Gaming release. If you prefer a general-purpose computing platform without a gaming focus, try Simplicity’s revamped release. Either way, you will experience a no-nonsense Linux OS that requires no assembly.

Simplicity Linux, originating in the UK, is a Devuan-based distribution with Cinnamon as the default window manager desktop environment. Devuan is a fork of Debian Linux that replaces the systemd initialization processes. Disgruntled Debian community members rejected a Linux-wide trend to replace older init processes such as Upstart and System V with systemd. Initialization is a background process that starts when the computer boots and runs until the computer shuts down.

[Source: LinuxInsider.com]

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Baidu releases open-source tool to detect faces without masks

Monday 17th of February 2020 07:01:26 PM

Search giant Baidu has released an open-source tool to detect whether individuals in crowds are wearing face masks, as cities around the country impose rules requiring use of such protection in public spaces.

The face-scanning model uses artificial intelligence to identify people in real-time who are not wearing masks or those who are wearing them incorrectly, Baidu said on Thursday. The system can identify non-mask wearers with 96.5% accuracy, which meets the needs of routine inspections, according to the company.

Developers then only need a small amount of data to train the tool for their own use. The model was trained on a dataset of 100,000 faces, Baidu said.

[Source: TechNode]

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Linux 5.7 Getting A “Tiny Power Button” Driver

Monday 17th of February 2020 06:58:25 PM

A new driver already queued in the power management code for the Linux 5.7 cycle not opening up until April is a “tiny power button” driver. This ACPI tiny power button driver is not for a physically tiny power button, but rather a simple ACPI power button driver out of Intel intended for virtual machines and more basic than the generic ACPI button driver given the limited scope of VMs.

Virtual machines tend to rely on simulated ACPI power button events for having the VM power off gracefully but can rely on a daemon like acpid or systemd-logind for processing the said event.

[Source: Phoronix]

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Python programming language: Now you can take NSA’s free course for beginners

Friday 14th of February 2020 11:25:36 PM

Developers already have numerous options from the likes of Microsoft and Google for learning how to code in the popular Python programming language. But now budding Python developers can read up on the National Security Agency’s own Python training materials.

Software engineer Chris Swenson filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the NSA for access to its Python training materials and received a lightly redacted 400-page printout of the agency’s COMP 3321 Python training course. Swenson has since scanned the documents, ran OCR on the text to make it searchable, and hosted it on Digital Oceans Spaces. The material has also been uploaded to the Internet Archive.

[Source: ZDNet]

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Linux is ready for the end of time

Friday 14th of February 2020 11:16:45 PM

On 03:14:08 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT, aka Coordinated Universal Time) January 19, 2038 (that’s a Tuesday), the world ends. Well, not in the biblical Book of Revelations sense. But, what will happen is the value for time in 32-bit based Unix-based operating systems, like Linux and older versions of macOS, runs out of numbers and starts counting time with negative numbers. That’s not good. We can expect 32-bit computers running these operating systems to have fits. Fortunately, Linux’s developers already had a fix ready to go.

The problem starts with how Unix tells time. Unix, and its relations — Linux, macOS, and other POSIX-compatible operating systems — date the beginning of time from the Epoch: 00:00:00 GMT on January 1, 1970. The Unix family measures time by the number of seconds since the Epoch.

[Source: ZDNet]

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Looking for an open-source VPN? We’ve got the answer

Friday 14th of February 2020 04:22:31 PM

After undergoing a successful independent security audit earlier this year, IVPN has announced that it will open source all of its VPN clients. The VPN provider’s Android, macOS, iOS and Windows apps are now open source under the GPLv3 license.

However, this is just the first step in IVPN’s multi-year plan to open source many other parts of its service. The company’s next step is to release key parts of its infrastructure to the public with end goal of enabling anyone to set up and verify its VPN server configuration.

[Source: Techradar]

The post Looking for an open-source VPN? We’ve got the answer appeared first on Linux.com.

How security keeps up when developers drive open source

Friday 14th of February 2020 02:52:28 AM

Technological transformation is increasingly becoming a competitive differentiator, with businesses across all sectors investing heavily in new platforms, tools and frameworks. In response, open source has emerged as the most viable, cost-effective and leading-edge solution in enabling organisations to gain the edge in innovation.

No longer do individual businesses need to purchase or build all the software they need in-house. Instead, developers can now benefit from and build on the work of entire development communities, harnessing their collective power instead of starting from scratch. This is enabling countless new strands of innovation and increasing the speed to market for new products. According to research, 69 per cent of IT leaders deem open source as very important to an organisation’s overall enterprise infrastructure software plans. But software development wasn’t always done this way.

[Source: ITProPortal]

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How to clone a drive from the Linux command line

Friday 14th of February 2020 02:52:24 AM

Cloning a drive in Linux actually isn’t too terribly difficult–especially if you’re comfortable with the Linux command line interface. But how do you do it? First you’ll need a bootable ISO image, of just about any Linux distribution, on a flash drive. You’ll also need a new drive to clone to. That target drive must be as big or bjgger than the drive you’re cloning. I prefer to go with bigger, just to be safe.

Once you have all of that ready, boot the machine with the source drive, using the bootable Linux distribution. Once you’ve logged in, make sure to attach the target drive to the system and find out where the target drive is located with the command:
cat /proc/partitions

You should see a listing of all available drives, but they shouldn’t be mounted. You’ll need the name of the source and target drives.

[Source: TechRepublic]

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Meet The Linux OS AMD Recommends For Superior Ryzen Threadripper 3990X Performance

Friday 14th of February 2020 02:51:07 AM

AMD and Intel may be fierce competitors in the CPU space, but the two companies aren’t always trying to cut each other down. In fact, during the press briefing for AMD’s 64-core Ryzen Threadripper 3990X, it actually recommended using Intel’s in-house Linux distribution for best performance.

That revelation comes from Michael Larabel, otherwise known as the benchmarking guru behind the cross-platform Phoronix Test Suite. Larabel has pages and pages of statistical proof that Intel’s Clear Linux is the idea Linux distribution to run on Intel CPUs when taking pure performance into account.

[Source: Forbes]

The post Meet The Linux OS AMD Recommends For Superior Ryzen Threadripper 3990X Performance appeared first on Linux.com.

Firefox 73 + Firefox 74 Beta Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

Friday 14th of February 2020 02:48:05 AM

Given this week’s release of Firefox 73 stable that also puts Firefox 74 into beta state, here are fresh Firefox browser benchmarks of Firefox 72/73/74 on Ubuntu Linux with and without WebRender as well as how it compares to the current state of Google Chrome. These benchmarks today are looking at the performance of Firefox 73 and looking ahead at how the performance is shaping up for Firefox 74 with the initial beta release. Secondary runs were also performed when force-enabling WebRender.

[Source: Phoronix]

The post Firefox 73 + Firefox 74 Beta Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux appeared first on Linux.com.

7 Open Source Projects We Love

Friday 14th of February 2020 02:47:58 AM

This Valentine’s Day, we are sharing a different kind of love, one only developers can truly appreciate: love of open source projects. If you’re a developer, open source probably plays a major role in your work. Perhaps you love it just as much as we do, and for that reason, we’ve created this post to share the seven open source projects we admire the most.

1. Apache Cassandra

Apache Cassandra is a distributed and decentralized database designed to manage massive amounts of structured and unstructured data across the world. It was developed at Facebook for inbox search and open sourced in July 2008. One of Cassandra’s most essential features is its elastic and linear scalability, which enables a consistently fast response time. Data is automatically replicated to multiple nodes for fault tolerance and easy distribution.

[Source: Security Boulevard]

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat/Fedora: FHE, CoreOS, LLVM, GraalVM and Paul Cormier

  • IBM Releases Fully Homomorphic Encryption Toolkit for MacOS and iOS; Linux and Android Coming Soon

    Often, when I begin explaining fully homomorphic encryption (FHE) to someone for the first time I start by saying that I’ve been working in the field for nearly a decade and yet, I still have to pause to spell it right. So, let’s call it FHE. Half-kidding aside, FHE really sounds like magic when you hear about it for the first time, but it’s actually based on very sound mathematics. The main difference is that FHE requires a shift in the programming paradigm that we are used to, which makes it a little more difficult to integrate into applications. That was until today thanks to a new toolkit we are making available for MacOS, iOS and soon for Linux and Android. In fact, developers with basic platform tool familiarity can get up and running by following a few simple instructions rather quickly (see video below). It was no small feat to synthesize 11 years of top-notch cryptography research into a streamlined developer experience that is accessible and freely available to anyone in the time most people would spend to brew a pot of coffee or de-clutter a desk.

  • New open source security tools let you develop on encrypted data

    Building security into the fabric of your applications no longer requires you to be an expert in cryptography. The open source IBM Fully Homomorphic Encryption Toolkits provide code and development environment settings that developers can use to experiment with a different kind of secure programming model.

  • Contribute at the Fedora CoreOS Test Day

    The Fedora CoreOS team has released the first Fedora CoreOS testing release based on Fedora 32. They expect that this release will promote to the stable channel in two weeks, on the usual schedule. As a result, the Fedora CoreOS and QA teams have organized a test day on Monday, June 08, 2020. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test cases and materials you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • IBM C/C++ and Fortran compilers to adopt LLVM open source infrastructure

    IBM® has been investing significantly in open source code, communities, and governance. LLVM is an open source compilation technology framework that is actively maintained by a large development community, supporting multiple architectures and programming languages. Clang is the open source C/C++ frontend for the LLVM project and provides full support for the latest language standards. IBM intends to fully incorporate the LLVM Core and Clang sub-projects in future C/C++ offerings on IBM z/OS®, Linux on Power, IBM AIX®, and IBM i (with PASE) platforms. As an active sponsor and strong supporter of the LLVM open source project, IBM is contributing code for both IBM Power® and IBM Z® in the areas of code generation and exploitation, portability and usability enhancements, and toolchain support. In 2019, IBM increased participation in the LLVM project by adding AIX support and enhancing loop optimizations. IBM is intending to fully leverage the LLVM infrastructure in C/C++ offerings as the next step in our compiler strategy.

  • Mandrel: A community distribution of GraalVM for the Red Hat build of Quarkus

    The Java community has demonstrated time and time again its ability to evolve, improve, and adapt to meet the needs of its developers and users. Even after 25 years of language and framework choices, Java has consistently ranked in the top languages in use today due to its strong track record and capabilities in enterprise use cases. Red Hat has long been a strong leader in Java and open source software development and remains committed to being at the forefront of Java as it continues to evolve. Today, Red Hat and the GraalVM community jointly established a new downstream distribution of GraalVM, called Mandrel. This distribution will power the Red Hat build of Quarkus, a recently announced addition to Red Hat Runtimes. This article explains what Mandrel is and why it is necessary.

  • Red Hat CEO Paul Cormier Talks About IBM and His Vision for the Future

    Paul Cormier recently sat down for a talk with us about how the company's relationship with its new owner, IBM, is working out and to reflect on where the company is going.

Latest Security Patches and FUD/Drama

Android Leftovers

Windows 10 May 2020 vs. Linux Performance On AMD Ryzen Threadripper

Given the recent release of the Windows 10 May 2020 Update, here are some fresh benchmarks showing how the latest Windows 10 software update paired with the latest AMD drivers performs against the latest 2020 Linux distribution releases. This testing was done on an AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X box given the interesting performance differences we have seen in the past to Linux's advantage with these HEDT processors. The Linux distributions tested against Windows 10 May 2020 Update were Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Arch-based Manjaro 20.0.2, Clear Linux 33250, and Fedora Workstation 32. Read more