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News For Open Source Professionals
Updated: 6 hours 33 min ago

OpenAI begins publicly tracking AI model efficiency

Tuesday 5th of May 2020 02:56:01 PM

OpenAI today announced it will begin tracking machine learning models that achieve state-of-the-art efficiency, an effort it believes will help identify candidates for scaling and achieving top overall performance. Beyond spotlighting top-performing AI models, OpenAI says that publicly measuring efficiency will paint a quantitative picture of algorithmic progress.
Read more at Venture Beat

The post OpenAI begins publicly tracking AI model efficiency appeared first on Linux.com.

Google Open Sources TensorFlow Runtime

Tuesday 5th of May 2020 02:56:01 PM

Google has open sourced TensorFlow RunTime (TFRT), a new TensorFlow runtime that aims to provide a unified, extensible infrastructure layer with best-in-class performance across a wide variety of domain-specific hardware. TFRT is responsible for the efficient execution of kernels – low-level device-specific primitives – on targeted hardware.

Read More at TFiR

The post Google Open Sources TensorFlow Runtime appeared first on Linux.com.

How to Assign Static IP Address on Ubuntu Linux

Tuesday 5th of May 2020 02:56:00 PM

Dynamic IP is not an issue for normal desktop Linux users in most cases. It could become an issue if you have employed some special kind of networking between your computers. Learn how to assign static IP address on Ubuntu and other Linux distributions.

Read More at It’s FOSS

The post How to Assign Static IP Address on Ubuntu Linux appeared first on Linux.com.

Ubuntu 20.04: Welcome to the future, Linux LTS disciples

Monday 4th of May 2020 07:44:48 PM

Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa, as this release is known) is a Long Term Support (LTS) release, which means Ubuntu’s parent company, Canonical, will provide support through 2025. The LTS releases are what Canonical calls “enterprise grade,” and these tend to be conservative when it comes to adopting new technologies.

Read More at Ars Technica

The post Ubuntu 20.04: Welcome to the future, Linux LTS disciples appeared first on Linux.com.

How an Open-source Headless CMS Can Help Remote Newsrooms

Monday 4th of May 2020 07:44:45 PM

Cloud based and collaborative technologies – from Slack to Zoom – have kept the lines of communication open. But the most important piece of software for the newly decentralised newsroom is the content management system. Open-source headless CMS Superdesk was created for moments just like this one.

Read More at iTech Post

The post How an Open-source Headless CMS Can Help Remote Newsrooms appeared first on Linux.com.

6 Kubernetes Prometheus Alternatives

Monday 4th of May 2020 07:44:42 PM

Prometheus is a popular open source monitoring tool that many companies use to monitor their IT infrastructure. However, there are many other monitoring tools available out there. This article reviews six alternatives for monitoring Kubernetes with Prometheus. Each tool has its own benefits and drawbacks.

Read More at Container Journal

The post 6 Kubernetes Prometheus Alternatives appeared first on Linux.com.

Hot On The Heels Of Mellanox, Nvidia Snaps Up Cumulus Networks

Monday 4th of May 2020 07:44:39 PM

Nvidia has acquired open network software provider Cumulus Networks for an undisclosed sum and married it with Mellanox in its newly formed networking business unit. In addition to creating the ONIE NOS installer, Cumulus Networks also created a fork of the open source Quagga routing stack, called Free Range Routing.

Read More at The Next Platform

The post Hot On The Heels Of Mellanox, Nvidia Snaps Up Cumulus Networks appeared first on Linux.com.

NVIDIA’s top scientist develops open-source ventilator that can be built with $400 in readily-available parts

Monday 4th of May 2020 07:42:13 PM

NVIDIA Chief Scientist Bill Daily has released an open-source ventilator hardware design he developed in order to address the shortage resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. The mechanical ventilator design can be assembled quickly, using off-the-shelf parts with a total cost of around $400 – making it an affordable alternative to traditional ventilators.

Read More at TechCrunch

The post NVIDIA’s top scientist develops open-source ventilator that can be built with $400 in readily-available parts appeared first on Linux.com.

LF Networking Boasts First Open Source PaaS for 5G NFV

Monday 4th of May 2020 07:42:06 PM

LF Networking has introduced what it describes as the first open source platform-as-a-service (PaaS) for 5G network functions. The project aims to enhance general PaaS functions from existing open source efforts for specialized telecommunications requirements. It is designed to enable more cloud deployments among network operators.

Read More at SDxCentral

The post LF Networking Boasts First Open Source PaaS for 5G NFV appeared first on Linux.com.

Raspberry Pi now has a High Quality Camera add-on

Friday 1st of May 2020 07:10:46 PM

Raspberry Pi has announced a new High Quality Camera add-on, available for $50. It turns your diminutive credit card-sized computer into a fully-fledged digital camera with the variable focus you’d expect from a DSLR. The lens should appeal to camera hackers who have long used the Raspberry Pi alongside DSLR cameras.

Read More at Pocket-lint.com

The post Raspberry Pi now has a High Quality Camera add-on appeared first on Linux.com.

Fedora 32 released with Lenovo support

Friday 1st of May 2020 07:10:46 PM

Fedora 32 is far more than just a workstation distribution. It uses the Linux Kernel 5.6 and also includes WireGuard virtual private network (VPN) support and USB4 support. The new Fedora also comes with a feature that, if you’re using a PC without much memory, will come in handy: EarlyOOM.

Read More at ZDNet

The post Fedora 32 released with Lenovo support appeared first on Linux.com.

Cloud Foundry Launches Tutorial Hub For New Users

Friday 1st of May 2020 07:10:44 PM

Here is some great news for developers keen to learn more about the family of open source projects! The Cloud Foundry Foundation (CFF) has launched a hub for Cloud Foundry-related tutorials for new users. The tutorials have been created and curated by the community.

Read More at TFiR

The post Cloud Foundry Launches Tutorial Hub For New Users appeared first on Linux.com.

Backfilling Learning Opportunities in Light of Cancelled Events

Friday 1st of May 2020 06:35:55 PM

Conferences, summits, forums, and other events have been canceled worldwide in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. These events are one of the most common ways technology professionals keep their skills and knowledge up to date, so these cancellations have a huge impact on the community. We’ve compiled some alternative ways of meeting this need below.
Learn More at Linux Foundation Training

The post Backfilling Learning Opportunities in Light of Cancelled Events appeared first on Linux.com.

Red Hat honors women’s contributions to open-source community

Friday 1st of May 2020 02:28:23 AM

This week, theCUBE spotlights Women in Open Source Award winners Megan Byrd-Sanicki and Netha Hussa in its Women in Tech feature. Byrd-Sanicki was recognized based on her commitment to open source over more than a decade, both in her current position at Google and her past work at Drupal Association.

Read More at SiliconANGLE

The post Red Hat honors women’s contributions to open-source community appeared first on Linux.com.

Open Source Tern Locks Dockerfile to Container Image

Friday 1st of May 2020 02:28:20 AM

The team behind the open source Tern tools for scanning container images has released an update. Originally developed by VMware, the 2.0 release of Tern addresses a Dockerfile issue that occurs when the base digest changes because the packages that make up the base image have changed.

Read More at Container Journal

The post Open Source Tern Locks Dockerfile to Container Image appeared first on Linux.com.

How to install the open source data visualization server Metabase

Friday 1st of May 2020 02:23:46 AM

Is your company looking for the means to visualize and present data for easier analysis? Open source tool Metabase is here to help. This is a powerful tool that can help your business make sense of all that data you’ve collected. And it won’t cost your business penny to use.

Read More at TechRepublic

The post How to install the open source data visualization server Metabase appeared first on Linux.com.

Facebook releases its ‘Blender’ chatbot as an open-source project

Friday 1st of May 2020 02:23:42 AM

Facebook has released a startlingly lifelike chatbot, dubbed Blender, as an open-source resource for AI research. The company claims that Blender is the single largest open-source chatbot created to date. It’s been trained on a whopping 9.4 billion parameters — nearly 4x as many as Google’s Meena.

Read More at Engadget

The post Facebook releases its ‘Blender’ chatbot as an open-source project appeared first on Linux.com.

Making Linux The ‘Most Secure’ OS For Remote Working

Friday 1st of May 2020 02:23:26 AM

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the challenges that are already in place. How will this pandemic change the way many industries operate? How polymorphic technologies by Polyverse protect Linux-powered systems to keep remote work secure? Don Maclean, Chief Cyber Security Technologist at DLT Solutions, has answers to these questions.

Read More at TFiR

The post Making Linux The ‘Most Secure’ OS For Remote Working appeared first on Linux.com.

Linux and Kubernetes: Serving The Common Goals of Enterprises

Thursday 30th of April 2020 01:13:12 PM

For Stefanie Chiras, VP & GM, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) Business Unit at Red Hat, aspects such as security and resiliency have always been important for Red Hat. More so, in the current situation when everyone has gone fully remote and it’s much harder to get people in front of the hardware for carrying out updates, patching, etc.

“As we look at our current situation, never has it been more important to have an operating system that is resilient and secure, and we’re focused on that,” she said.

The recently released version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.2 inadvertently address these challenge as it makes it easier for technology leaders to embrace the latest, production-ready innovations swiftly which offering security and resilience that their IT teams need.

RHEL’s embrace of a predictable 6-month minor release cycle also helped customers plan upgrades more efficiently.

“There is value for customers in having predictability of minor releases on a six-month cycle. Without knowing when they were coming was causing disruptions for them. The launch of 8.2 is now the second time we have delivered on our commitment of having minor releases every six months,” said Stefanie Chiras.

In addition to offering security updates, the new version adds insights capabilities and forays into newer areas of innovation.

The upgrade has expanded the earlier capability called ‘Adviser’ dramatically. Additional functionalities such as drift monitoring and CVE coverage allow for a much deeper granularity into how the infrastructure is running.

“It really amplifies the skills that are already present in ops and sysadmin teams, and this provides a Red Hat consultation, if you will, directly into the data center,” claimed Charis.

As containers are increasingly being leveraged for digital transformation, RHEL 8.2 offers an updated application stream of Red Hat’s container tools. It also has new, containerized versions of Buildah and Skopeo.

Skopeo is an open-source image copying tool, while Buildah is a tool for building Docker- and Kubernetes-compatible images easily and quickly.

RHEL has also ensured in-place upgrades in the new version. Customers can now directly in-place upgrade from version 7 to version 8.2.

Chiras believes Linux has emerged as the go-to-platform for innovations such as Machine Learning, Deep Learning, and Artificial Intelligence.

“Linux has now become the springboard of innovation,” she argued. “AI, machine learning, and deep learning are driving a real change in not just the software but also the hardware. In the context of these emerging technologies, it’s all about making them consumable into an enterprise.”

“We’re very focused on our ecosystem, making sure that we’re working in the right upstream communities with the right ISVs, with the right hardware partners to make all of that magic come together,” Chiras said.

Towards this end, Red Hat has been partnering with multiple architectures for a long time — be it an x86 architecture, ARM, Power, or mainframe with IBM Z. Its partnership with Nvidia pulls in capabilities such as FPGAs, and GPU.

Synergizing Kubernetes and Linux 

Kubernetes is fast finding favor in enterprises.  So how do Linux and Kubernetes serve the common goals of enterprises?

“Kubernetes is a new way to deploy Linux. We’re very focused on providing operational consistency by leveraging our technology in RHEL and then bringing in that incredible capability of Kubernetes within our OpenShift product line,” Chiras said.

The deployment of Linux within a Kubernetes environment is much more complicated than in a traditional deployment. RHEL, therefore, made some key changes. The company created Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS — an optimized version of RHEL for the OpenShift experience.

“It’s deployed as an immutable. It’s tailored, narrow, and gets updated as part of your OpenShift update to provide consistent user experience and comprehensive security.

The launch of the Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) offers users greater security, reliability, and performance of official Red Hat container images where OCI-compliant Linux containers run.

“Kubernetes is a new way to deploy Linux. It really is a tight collaboration but what we’re really focused on is the customer experience. We want them to get easy updates with consistency and reliability, resilience and security. We’re pulling all of that together. With such advancements going on, it’s a fascinating space to watch,” added Chiras.

 

The post Linux and Kubernetes: Serving The Common Goals of Enterprises appeared first on Linux.com.

Microsoft open-sources in-house library for handling QUIC connections

Wednesday 29th of April 2020 09:51:40 PM

Microsoft has open-sourced this week the source code of MsQuic, the company’s in-house library for handling network connections established via the new QUIC protocol. QUIC stands for “Quick UDP Internet Connections.” It is a new data transfer protocol that is currently being standardized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

Read More at ZDNet

The post Microsoft open-sources in-house library for handling QUIC connections appeared first on Linux.com.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

LibreOffice 6.4.5 finally for Slackware 14.2

The Document Foundation recently released version 7.0.0 of their Libre Office suite of applications. The packages for Slackware-current can be found in my repository. But the situation for Slackware 14.2 used to be different – I got stuck after LibreOffice 6.2 because the newer source releases (6.3 and onwards) require versions of system software that our stable Slackware 14.2 platform does not offer. From time to time during the last year, when there was time and the build box was not compiling packages, I messed around with the libreoffice.SlackBuild script in futile attempts to compile recent versions of LibreOffice on Slackware 14.2. I failed all the time. Until last week. After I had uploaded the new KDE Plasma5 packages to ‘ktown‘, I had an epiphany and decided to use a new approach. What I did was: question all the historic stuff in the SlackBuild script that got added whenever I needed to work around compilation failures; and accept that the compilation needs newer versions of software than Slackware 14.2 offers. The first statement meant that I disabled patches and variable declarations that messed with compiler and linker; and for the second statement I stuck to a single guideline: the end product, if I were able to compile a package successfully, has to run out of the box on Slackware 14.2 without the need to update any of the core Slackware packages. Read more

Web Browsers: New Tor RC, Firefox/Mozilla Trouble, and Web Browsers Need to Stop

  • New release candidate: 0.4.4.4-rc

    There's a new alpha release available for download. If you build Tor from source, you can download the source code for 0.4.4.4-rc from the download page. Packages should be available over the coming weeks, with a new alpha Tor Browser release likely in the coming weeks.

    Remember, this is a release candidate, not a a stable release: you should only run this if you'd like to find and report more bugs than usual.

  • Mozilla is dead

    If Mozilla wants to survive, the management will be fired with unearned compensation, the most important departments will be strengthened, products that nobody ordered will be discontinued and the organization will be limited to its core competence. Browser, email, security, adaptability and the fight for a free Internet. And they work with all their might to ensure that the products will become an integral part of everyday life and all operating systems.

    Three months. That’s all the time they have for a clear signal. After that, users have to make a decision. Unfortunately, it will probably only be something with chromium.

    Poor Internet.

  • Web browsers need to stop

    I call for an immediate and indefinite suspension of the addition of new developer-facing APIs to web browsers. Browser vendors need to start thinking about reducing scope and cutting features. WebUSB, WebBluetooth, WebXR, WebDRM WebMPAA WebBootlicking replacing User-Agent with Vendor-Agent cause let’s be honest with ourselves at this point “Encrypted Media Extensions” — this crap all needs to go. At some point you need to stop adding scope and start focusing on performance, efficiency, reliability, and security5 at the scope you already have.