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Updated: 5 hours 41 min ago

Wine 4.18 Released With Many Bug Fixes

Friday 18th of October 2019 09:37:34 PM

While three weeks have passed since the previous Wine development release compared to the usual two-week cadence, Wine 4.18 is out today and isn’t too busy on the feature front but there are more than three dozen bug fixes. The delay and Wine 4.18 not being particularly big appear to be due to WineConf taking place last week in Toronto keeping many of the developers busy. New Wine 4.18 feature work includes implementing more VBScript functions, cleanups/improvements to the Apple macOS Quartz code, and fixes for test case failures. (Phoronix)

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Mirantis Partners With OpenStack Foundation to Support Upgraded COA Exam

Friday 18th of October 2019 09:05:19 PM

Mirantis announced today that it is providing resources to the OpenStack Foundation, including becoming the new administrators of the upgraded Certified OpenStack Administrator (COA) exam. (Mirantis)

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Unpatched Linux bug may open devices to serious attacks over Wi-Fi

Friday 18th of October 2019 12:40:53 AM

A potentially serious vulnerability in Linux may make it possible for nearby devices to use Wi-Fi signals to crash or fully compromise vulnerable machines, a security researcher said. The flaw is located in the RTLWIFI driver, which is used to support Realtek Wi-Fi chips in Linux devices. The vulnerability triggers a buffer overflow in the Linux kernel when a machine with a Realtek Wi-Fi chip is within radio range of a malicious device. At a minimum, exploits would cause an operating-system crash and could possibly allow a hacker to gain complete control of the computer. The flaw dates back to version 3.10.1 of the Linux kernel released in 2013. (Arstechnica)

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Microsoft Announces Open Source Dapr

Thursday 17th of October 2019 09:19:38 PM

Dapr is an open source, portable, event-driven runtime that makes it easy for developers to build resilient, microservice stateless and stateful applications that run on the cloud and edge. Dapr embraces the diversity of all programming languages and developer frameworks and simplifies building applications such as the e-commerce example. (Microsoft)

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Ubuntu 19.10 arrives with edge capabilities for Kubernetes

Thursday 17th of October 2019 11:17:24 AM

Following 25 weeks of development, Canonical today released Ubuntu 19.10. Highlights include new edge capabilities for Kubernetes, an integrated AI developer experience, and the fastest GNOME desktop performance yet. You can download Ubuntu 19.10 from here. (VentureBeat)

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Fedora at 15: Why Matthew Miller sees a bright future for the Linux distribution

Thursday 17th of October 2019 02:09:52 AM

Fedora project leader Matthew Miller discusses lessons learned from the past, future architectural changes, as well as hot-button topics, including systemd. In a wide-ranging interview with TechRepublic, Fedora project leader Matthew Miller discussed lessons learned from the past, popular adoption and competing standards for software containers, potential changes coming to Fedora, as well as hot-button topics, including systemd. (TechRepublic)

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Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Delivers New Developer Client Tools

Thursday 17th of October 2019 02:05:11 AM

Red Hat has introduced the latest version of its enterprise Kubernetes platform. According to the company, Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 aims to make cloud-native technologies easier to use and more accessible for developers via capabilities that automate the set-up and management of Kubernetes environments. This enables developers to focus on building the next-generation of enterprise applications without requiring deep Kubernetes expertise. (TFiR)

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The Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Codename Has Been Revealed

Thursday 17th of October 2019 01:46:25 AM

The Ubuntu 20.04 LTS codename has been revealed on Launchpad, home of Ubuntu development. Following Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’, the next version of Ubuntu will, as expected, be based around the letter “F”. But it’s not going to be Feral Ferret, Famous Fox or Finicky Falcon. No, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is codenamed the “Focal Fossa“. (OMG! Ubuntu)

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Google launches the $649 Pixelbook Go Chromebook

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 08:33:44 AM

At its annual hardware event, Google today announced the launch of the Pixelbook Go, the latest iteration of its first-party Chromebook lineup. Starting at $649, the Pixelbook Go marks a return to the standard laptop format after last year’s Pixelbook with a 180-degree hinge and the Pixel Slate 2-in-1. (TechCrunch)

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Databricks brings its Delta Lake project to the Linux Foundation

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 08:26:13 AM

Databricks, the big data analytics service founded by the original developers of Apache Spark, today announced that it is bringing its Delta Lake open-source project for building data lakes to the Linux Foundation and under an open governance model. The company announced the launch of Delta Lake earlier this year and even though it’s still a relatively new project, it has already been adopted by many organizations and has found backing from companies like Intel, Alibaba and Booz Allen Hamilton. (TechCrunch)

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Linux Sudo bug opens root access to unauthorized users

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 11:17:06 AM

Sudo, the main command in Linux that allows users to run tasks, has been found to have a vulnerability that allows unauthorized users to execute commands as a root user. The vulnerability, known as CVE-2019-14287, does require a nonstandard configuration but nonetheless does open the door to unauthorized users. (SiliconAngle)

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Red Hat CFO ‘Dismissed’ From Company

Monday 14th of October 2019 02:42:02 PM

Red Hat Inc.’s finance chief Eric Shander has been dismissed from the company, forfeiting a $4 million retention award that was agreed to ahead of Red Hat’s acquisition by International Business Machines Corp. The Raleigh, N.C.-based software company confirmed late Thursday that Mr. Shander was no longer working at Red Hat. “Eric was dismissed without pay in connection with Red Hat’s workplace standards,” a company spokeswoman said in a statement. (WSJ)

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OpenSUSE’s OBS Can Now Spin Windows Subsystem for Linux Images

Monday 14th of October 2019 02:37:05 PM

The openSUSE’s Open Build Service (OBS) has been picking up the ability to build Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) images for those wishing to craft their own WSL distribution or just rebuild openSUSE from source as a reproducible/verifiable build. The complexity with spinning openSUSE WSL images in OBS is the appx files that need to be assembled, which they have relied upon using Microsoft Visual Studio from a Windows machine. But now in making use of the MinGW cross-toolchain they are generating the necessary appx files directly on Linux. (Phoronix)

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SAP Embraces Serverless Computing Frameworks

Saturday 12th of October 2019 03:52:23 AM

SAP has begun to make available extensions to its cloud platform that enable customers to leverage a framework running on top of Kubernetes to invoke serverless computing frameworks. The framework is based on the open source Kyma project spearheaded by SAP. Thomas Grassl, vice president for developer relations and the SAP Community, says SAP expects developers to make extensive use of serverless computing frameworks running on public clouds to not only dynamically invoke additional compute resources when needed, but also reduce the size of their applications by relying on functions as a service to, for example, run an analytics process. (Container Journal)

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Stallman: No radical changes in GNU Project

Saturday 12th of October 2019 02:40:37 AM

Richard Stallman has issued a brief statement saying that there will not be any radical changes in the GNU Project’s goals, principles and policies. “I would like to make incremental changes in how some decisions are made, because I won’t be here forever and we need to ready others to make GNU Project decisions when I can no longer do so. But these won’t lead to unbounded or radical changes.” (LWN)

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SIOS Offers SAP Certified High Availability And Disaster Recovery For SAP S/4HANA Environments In The Cloud

Saturday 12th of October 2019 02:39:04 AM

High availability is critical to many businesses that can’t afford any downtime. They need redundancy built into the applications themselves so that they can automatically recover in a matter of minutes. SIOS specializes in IT Resilience through intelligent application availability. It’s the first provider of Linux clustering services. SIOS recently announced the latest releases of SIOS LifeKeeper 9.4 and SIOS DataKeeper 9.4, at the SAP TechEd event. SIOS integrates with SAP to deliver overall availability protection through automation of setup, monitoring, and failure management within SAP environments. (TFiR)

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Plasma 5.17 Beta in openSUSE Tumbleweed

Saturday 12th of October 2019 12:07:13 AM

The Beta version of Plasma 5.17 was released with many new features and improvements such as per-screen fractional scaling on Wayland, a new User Interface (UI) for configuring permissions of Thunderbolt devices and network statistics in KSysGuard. The latter requires some more privileges than usual for a user application, so is currently being looked at by the SUSE security team. (openSUSE Blog)

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Tails 4.0 Anonymous OS Release Candidate Out Now with Tor Browser 9.0, Linux 5.3

Friday 11th of October 2019 07:32:34 PM

The development team behind the Tails amnesic incognito live system, also known as the Anonymous OS, have announced today the Release Candidate (RC) version of the upcoming Tails 4.0 release. Powered by the latest Linux 5.3.2 kernel, Tails 4.0 Release Candidate is packed with up-to-date technologies to better protect your privacy when surfing the Internet. It comes with the latest alpha version of the upcoming TOR Browser 9.0 anonymous web browser based on Firefox 68.1.0 ESR, as well as the newest Tor 0.4.1.6 release. (Softpedia)

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GNOME 3.34 Desktop Gets First Point Release, It’s Now Ready for Mass Adoption

Friday 11th of October 2019 05:52:12 AM

The GNOME Project announced today that the first point release of the latest GNOME 3.34 desktop environment is now available for download with various bug fixes and updated translations. Released last month on September 12th, the GNOME 3.34 “Thessaloniki” desktop environment introduced many new features and enhancements, such as support for custom folders in the application overview, visual refreshes for several apps and the desktop itself, as well as lots of performance improvements. (SoftPedia)

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System76 launches two Linux with Comet Lake chips and Coreboot

Thursday 10th of October 2019 11:02:52 PM

Linux computer company System76 is updating its laptop lineup with its first two models to ship with 10th-gen Intel Core “Comet Lake” processors. The new 14 inch Galago Pro and 15.6 inch Darter Pro laptops also ship with the open source Coreboot firmware rather than a proprietary BIOS. As Phoronix points out, these laptops still have some Intel proprietary blobs, so it’s probably best to think of them as more open than most laptops rather than computers running 100-percent free and open source software. (Liliputing)

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More in Tux Machines

CentOS 8.0-1905

CentOS is a community-run project which builds its distribution from the source code of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The project's goal is to provide a binary compatible, nearly identical experience to Enterprise Linux, but without the commercial support provided by Red Hat. This makes CentOS an attractive option for people who want to have a distribution with long-term support and the same technology Red Hat provides, but feel they do not need vendor support. I reviewed Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL 8), briefly covering the distribution's installer, software and settings management, several of its Workstation features, and a few of its server technologies, such as Cockpit. I ran into several issues during that experience - some of them relating to documentation, some dealing with permission problems, some due to missing applications in the official repositories - and I was curious to see if CentOS would provide the same experience, problems and all. One could assume so given CentOS uses the same source code, but CentOS has its own website and repositories so I thought it would be worth giving it a test run and seeing what differences, if any, I could spot. In particular, I planned to focus on the strengths and weaknesses I observed in the conclusion of my RHEL 8 review. Before I get to my experiences with CentOS 8.0.1905, I feel it is worth mentioning that CentOS is now available in two branches: CentOS Linux, the traditional, fixed release operating system based on RHEL; and CentOS Stream. The new Stream branch is described as a rolling release platform which will fit in somewhere between Fedora and RHEL. The idea appears to be that software and concepts will get their initial testing in Fedora. Then Red Hat will fork a version of Fedora to be the basis of a future RHEL release. Changes and improvements that would normally be made internally within Red Hat prior to the next RHEL will become available for the public to try and comment on in CentOS Stream. Ideally, the plan here seems to be that this will give a larger portion of the community a chance to try new ideas and report issues, giving Red Hat more feedback and a chance to polish their commercial offering. Read more

Docker, Podman and Kubernetes

Graphics: Radeon, Mesa and More

  • Open-Source C.A.S. Vulkan Layer - Similar to Radeon Image Sharpening But For Any GPU

    AMD's Radeon Image Sharpening feature is designed to improve image quality with minimal performance costs. However, it is only supported by Radeon Polaris / Vega / Navi graphics cards and only under Microsoft Windows 10. An independent open-source project has implemented contrast adaptive sharpening support for Vulkan that is similar to Radeon Image Sharpening but will work for any Vulkan-enabled GPU -- including NVIDIA GPUs.

  • MSM+Freedreno Driver Stack Adding Support For The Adreno 510 GPU

    While the MSM+Freedreno open-source graphics driver stack already supports the Adreno 500 and 600 series, one of the GPUs not seeing support until now was the basic Adreno 510. Kernel patches are pending for A510 enablement while the Mesa support was already merged. The Adreno 510 is the graphics processor within the Snapdragon 650, 652, and 653 models and used in lower-end devices. With the kernel and Mesa patches, the Adreno 510 is now working on the likes of the Sony Xperia X and X Compact smartphones.

  • AMD Lands Greater Direct State Access Support Within Mesa

    Landing this week in Mesa 19.3-devel were more functions being implemented around the big OpenGL EXT_direct_state_access extension. OpenGL's direct state access functions are intended to allow more OpenGL state to be accessed/updated directly aside form the selector commands. Using EXT_direct_state_access allows for various efficiency improvements.

Programming Leftovers

  • Codeplay Launches Open-Source 'SYCL Academy' To Learn This Increasingly Popular Standard

    While SYCL has been around for five years as a Khronos standard providing a single-source C++ programming model for exploiting OpenCL, it has yet to reach its prime but demand for it is picking up with Intel working to upstream their SYCL back-end in LLVM, SYCL becoming part of their programming model with oneAPI and Xe Graphics, and other vendors also jumping on the SYCL bandwagon. Codeplay has now provided an open-source SYCL learning code for those interested in this higher-level alternative to straight OpenCL programming.

  • Open-Source Build and Test Tool Bazel Reaches 1.0

    Derived from Google's internal build tool Blaze, Bazel is a build and test tool that offers a human-readable definition language and is particularly aimed at large, multi-language, multi-repositories projects. Originally open-sourced in 2015, Bazel has now reached 1.0. One of the major implications of reaching version 1.0 for Bazel is the promise of greater stability and backward-compatibility guarantees. This has been a historical pain point for Bazel users, who often found themselves in the situation of having to rewrite part of their build rules due to frequent breaking changes in Bazel or its ecosystem. Accordingly, the Bazel team has committed to following semantic versioning for future Bazel releases, meaning only major versions will be allowed to include breaking changes. Furthermore, the team committed to maintaining a minimum stability window of three months between major versions.

  • DevOps Deeper Dive: DevOps Accelerates Open Source Innovation Pace

    That rate of innovation has increased dramatically in the last few years. However, much of that innovation would not have been possible if large swaths of the open source community hadn’t been able to employ best DevOps practices to collaborate, said CloudBees CEO Sacha Labourey. [...] None of this shift has been lost on IT vendors. As the demand for proprietary code slackened, many found it profitable to offer support services for open source software. The more there is to consume, the more the support services contracts grew. Now every vendor from IBM to small IT services providers such as Fairwinds has launched open source projects that help drive demand for IT services expertise. “There’s pain around integrating a lot of disparate open source projects,” said Robert Brennan, director of open source software for Fairwinds. “Organizations may be getting software for free, but there’s usually not a lot of help around.” Now almost every IT vendor in the world is making software engineers available to work on open source projects. All that talent focused on open source projects has led to the development of new platforms such as Jenkins, GitHub, Kubernetes and, more recently, a raft of smaller projects. With the rise of containers and cloud-native applications, open source software projects are entering another era that will see many of those same software engineers leveraging DevOps practices more broadly to drive even more innovative projects at increasingly faster rates.

  • Find your next developer from open source communities

    Meanwhile, demand for data scientists is rising as companies seek AI-based solutions to stay competitive. Demand is reflected in salary offers. Companies competing to hire and retain data experts are offering on average more than US$100,000, making it one of the most highly paid professions in the States. For companies lacking the budget to hire or train in-house staff to fill the role, they may find themselves struggling with maintaining technological infrastructure or moving forward with plans for digitization. Therefore, open source learning and further development of communities could be the solution to this gap. An IBM grant to support open source communities such as Girls Who Code, a non-profit organization offering coding lessons for women in the US, is a step forward to filling in a shortage of software developers.