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LinuxSecurity.com Advisories

Syndicate content LinuxSecurity - Security Advisories
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news.
Updated: 3 hours 54 min ago

Fedora 33: libopenmpt 2021-7ff1c8680d>

Saturday 16th of October 2021 04:46:58 PM
https://lib.openmpt.org/libopenmpt/2021/10/04/security- updates-0.5.12-0.4.24-0.3.33/

Fedora 34: vim 2021-968f57ec98>

Saturday 16th of October 2021 04:44:57 PM
The newest upstream commit Security fix for CVE-2021-3796 Security fix for CVE-2021-3778

Fedora 34: libopenmpt 2021-7cc30bb3dd>

Saturday 16th of October 2021 04:44:24 PM
https://lib.openmpt.org/libopenmpt/2021/10/04/security- updates-0.5.12-0.4.24-0.3.33/

Debian: DSA-4988-1: libreoffice security update>

Saturday 16th of October 2021 03:23:57 PM
Two security issues have been discovered in LibreOffice's support for digital signatures in ODF documents, which could result in incorrect signature indicators/timestamps being presented.

openSUSE: 2021:3451-1 important: MozillaFirefox>

Saturday 16th of October 2021 11:15:44 AM
An update that fixes 20 vulnerabilities is now available.

SUSE: 2021:412-1 suse/sle15 Security Update>

Saturday 16th of October 2021 05:19:24 AM
The container suse/sle15 was updated. The following patches have been included in this update:

SUSE: 2021:411-1 suse/sle15 Security Update>

Saturday 16th of October 2021 05:13:56 AM
The container suse/sle15 was updated. The following patches have been included in this update:

Debian LTS: DLA-2785-1: linux-4.19 security update>

Friday 15th of October 2021 07:50:44 PM
Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a privilege escalation, denial of service or information leaks.

openSUSE: 2021:1358-1 important: opera>

Friday 15th of October 2021 05:18:40 PM
An update that fixes three vulnerabilities is now available.

openSUSE: 2021:1359-1: libaom>

Friday 15th of October 2021 05:17:32 PM
An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available.

Fedora 34: chromium 2021-116eff380f>

Friday 15th of October 2021 03:23:21 PM
Update to 94.0.4606.81. Built with is_official_build=true, which disables all sorts of debugging check functions that upstream turned on in 94. These debugging checks were failing and causing the program to crash in ... fun ways. It also fixes the usual pile of security issues, most notably: CVE-2021-37974 CVE-2021-37975 CVE-2021-37976 CVE-2021-37977 CVE-2021-37978 CVE-2021-37979

Fedora 34: xen 2021-80bbe7def0>

Friday 15th of October 2021 03:22:51 PM
PCI devices with RMRRs not deassigned correctly [XSA-386, CVE-2021-28702] (#2011248)

Fedora 33: xen 2021-0b7a484688>

Friday 15th of October 2021 02:54:11 PM
PCI devices with RMRRs not deassigned correctly [XSA-386, CVE-2021-28702] (#2011248)

openSUSE: 2021:1357-1 important: the Linux Kernel>

Friday 15th of October 2021 02:17:37 PM
An update that solves 6 vulnerabilities and has 43 fixes is now available.

Debian: DSA-4987-1: squashfs-tools security update>

Friday 15th of October 2021 08:58:53 AM
Richard Weinberger reported that unsquashfs in squashfs-tools, the tools to create and extract Squashfs filesystems, does not check for duplicate filenames within a directory. An attacker can take advantage of this flaw for writing to arbitrary files to the filesystem if a malformed

openSUSE: 2021:3447-1 important: the Linux Kernel>

Friday 15th of October 2021 08:30:39 AM
An update that solves 6 vulnerabilities and has 44 fixes is now available.

openSUSE: 2021:3445-1 important: rpm>

Friday 15th of October 2021 08:16:44 AM
An update that contains security fixes can now be installed.

openSUSE: 2021:1355-1 moderate: mbedtls>

Friday 15th of October 2021 05:16:09 AM
An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available.

Ubuntu 5091-3: Linux kernel (Azure) regression>

Thursday 14th of October 2021 09:54:36 PM
USN-5091-1 introduced a regression in the Linux kernel for Microsoft Azure cloud systems.

RedHat: RHSA-2021-3873:01 Important: Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management>

Thursday 14th of October 2021 06:45:55 PM
Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes 2.2.9 General Availability release images, which provide security updates, one or more container updates, and bug fixes. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact

More in Tux Machines

PinePhone Pro is here, Finally. A premium Linux Smartphone

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today's howtos (GIMP only)

C/C++ Programming/Development

  • How to pass a struct to a function in C

    A structure has been widely used as a user-defined data type in the C language. The purpose of using structures in C is to create a single data type that would be used further to group various data type variables or elements into one type. The structure has been used as a global variable so all the functions can access it easily. This means it can’t be declared in the main method so that we can use it anywhere.

  • C++ String Reverse

    If the string, “vwxyz“, is reproduced in the new order as, “zyxwv“. Then the string has been reversed. Unfortunately, such direct reversibility is not possible in C++. However, there is a classical workaround for reversing a string in C++. Keep reading this article to know-how. A string can be created in two main ways in C++. A string can be created as a constant pointer to a sequence of characters. A string can also be created by instantiating a string object from the string class. This article deals with string objects instantiated from the string class. This means the string library has to be included in order to execute the code samples in this article. A string object is a data structure where the string literal is a list. Each character is of one element in the list. And so, a literal string can be handled like an array of elements. This article explains the classical workaround to reverse a string in C++. This essentially iterates the string literal, backward. Having a summary knowledge of forward iteration enables the reader to understand reverse iteration better. This article deals with string objects instantiated from the string class.

  • C++ String starts with

    There comes a time when the programmer has to know what a string starts with. This knowledge can be used to choose or eliminate items in a list of characters. So, a programmer may want to know if a string starts with a particular character or with a particular sub-string. A programmer can write code that will check the initial characters of a string, one-by-one, and compare that with a prefix sub-string. However, all the strategies involved have already been done by the C++ string library. The C++ string class of the string library has the member function, starts_with(). This does the work for the programmer, but the programmer needs to know how to use the function. And that is why this tutorial is being produced. There are three variants of the string starts_with() member function. Variants of the same function are called overloaded functions. The basic approach for the start_with() member function is to compare a short independent sub-string with the first short segment of the string in question. If they are the same, then the function returns true. If they are different, the function returns false.

  • Function Overloading in C

    Function overloading is a very well-known concept used in object-oriented languages having many functions with the same name and different parameters in a single code. The object-oriented programming languages which support function overloading include Java and C++. As the C compiler doesn’t allow it to be used in the code hence, it isn’t easy to implement function overloading in C. Yet; we can still achieve the same thing with some technique. Let’s start this article with the opening of the shell terminal of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

PineTime Smartwatch and Good Code Play Bad Apple

PineTime is the open smartwatch from our friends at Pine64. [TT-392] wanted to prove the hardware can play a full-motion music video, and they are correct, to a point. When you watch the video below, you should notice the monochromatic animation maintaining a healthy framerate, and there lies all the hard work. Without any modifications, video would top out at approximately eight frames per second. To convert an MP4, you need to break it down into images, which will strip out the sound. Next, you load them into the Linux-only video processor, which looks for clusters of pixels that need changing and ignores the static ones. Relevant pixel selection takes some of the load off the data running to the display and boosts the fps since you don’t waste time reminding it that a block of black pixels should stay the way they are. Lastly, the process will compress everything to fit it into the watch’s onboard memory. Even though it is a few minutes of black and white pictures, compiling can take a couple of hours. Read more