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Updated: 1 hour 19 min ago

Q4OS Linux Revives Your Old Laptop with Windows’ Looks

Friday 22nd of February 2019 06:56:39 AM
Q4OS is a lightweight Linux distribution based on Debian. It imitates the look and feel of Windows. Read the complete review to know more about Q4OS Linux.

DevOps for Network Engineers: Linux Foundation’s New Training Course

Thursday 21st of February 2019 11:48:47 AM
Linux Foundation has launched a DevOps course for sysadmins and network engineers. They are also offering a limited time 40% discount on the launch.

Some Incredible Stories Around Tux: Our Lovable Linux Mascot!

Thursday 21st of February 2019 07:17:17 AM
You already know Tux, the Linux mascot. But do you know how it was created? Read some interesting trivia around Tux.

Decentralized Slack Alternative Riot Releases its First Stable Version

Wednesday 20th of February 2019 06:41:58 AM
The first stable release of decentralized, open source messaging software Riot has been released. See what's new!

How to List Installed Packages on Ubuntu and Debian [Quick Tip]

Tuesday 19th of February 2019 05:45:13 AM
Here are multiple ways you can see what packages have been installed on Ubuntu and Debian based distributions. You'll also learn to list recently installed packages.

How to Change User Password in Ubuntu [Beginner’s Tutorial]

Sunday 17th of February 2019 03:23:58 AM
Want to change root password in Ubuntu? Learn how to change the password for any user in Ubuntu Linux. Both terminal and GUI methods have been discussed.

FinalCrypt – An Open Source File Encryption Application

Saturday 16th of February 2019 11:59:51 AM
FinalCrypt is a free and open source encryption tool that allows you to encrypt files with a key. It is available for Linux, Windows and macOS.

The Earliest Linux Distros: Before Mainstream Distros Became So Popular

Thursday 14th of February 2019 05:45:33 AM
In this throwback history article, we’ve tried to look back into how some of the earliest Linux distributions evolved and came into being as we know them today.

Top 10 Best Linux Media Server Software

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 11:59:57 AM
Here's our list of best open source media server software for Linux. You can use them to make your own home based media server or use it with Chromecast, Firestick etc.

Ubuntu 14.04 is Reaching the End of Life. Here are Your Options

Monday 11th of February 2019 02:49:59 PM
Ubuntu 14.04 is reaching its end of lie on April 30, 2019. This means there will be no security updates for Ubuntu 14.04 users beyond this date. Here's what you can do if you are still using Ubuntu 14.04.

LibreOffice 6.2 is Here: This is the Last Release with 32-bit Binaries

Saturday 9th of February 2019 12:34:24 PM
LibreOffice version 6.2 has been released with a number of major changes but this will be the last LibreOffice release to provide 32-bit binaries.

3 Ways to Install Deb Files on Ubuntu Linux

Friday 8th of February 2019 07:28:49 AM
This beginner article explains how to install deb packages in Ubuntu. It also shows you how to remove those deb packages afterwards.

Review of Debian System Administrator’s Handbook

Thursday 7th of February 2019 06:41:44 AM
Debian System Administrator's Handbook is a free-to-download book that covers all the essential part of Debian that a sysadmin might need.

Flowblade 2.0 is Here with New Video Editing Tools and a Refreshed UI

Wednesday 6th of February 2019 05:49:51 AM
The Linux-only video editor Flowblade has released its new version with workflow overhaul, new tools and refreshed UI. Check it out.

Installing Kali Linux on VirtualBox: Quickest & Safest Way

Tuesday 5th of February 2019 07:36:32 AM
This step-by-step tutorial teaches you to install Kali Linux on VirtualBox on Windows and Linux. This is the safest, easiest & quickest way of using Kali Linux.

Enjoy Netflix? You Should Thank FreeBSD

Monday 4th of February 2019 05:42:24 AM
Netflix uses FreeBSD and open source software to deliver its content efficiently worldwide.

CrossCode is an Awesome 16-bit Sci-Fi RPG Game

Saturday 2nd of February 2019 11:27:13 AM
CrossCode manages to bundle all of its influences into a seamless gaming experience that feels nothing shy of excellent.

VA Linux: The Linux Company That Once Ruled NASDAQ

Thursday 31st of January 2019 06:53:00 AM
RedHat may be the most valuable Linux companies these days but once there was VA Linux that once broke records at NASDAQ. Read more about the spectacular rise and devastating fall of VA Linux.

Olive is a new Open Source Video Editor Aiming to Take On Biggies Like Final Cut Pro

Wednesday 30th of January 2019 05:13:29 AM
Olive is a cross-platform, free and open source video editor in development and it aims to compete with the likes of Final Cut Pro.

Top Hex Editors for Linux

Monday 28th of January 2019 05:40:03 AM
Here are our choices for the best hex editors for Linux. The list includes both GUI and command line based Linux hex editors.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Clear Linux Has A Goal To Get 3x More Upstream Components In Their Distro
    For those concerned that running Clear Linux means less available packages/bundles than the likes of Debian, Arch Linux, and Fedora with their immense collection of packaged software, Clear has a goal this year of increasing their upstream components available on the distribution by three times. Intel Fellow Arjan van de Ven provided an update on their bundling state/changes for the distribution. In this update he shared that the Clear Linux team at Intel established a goal this year to have "three times more upstream components in the distro. That's a steep growth, and we want to do that with some basic direction and without reducing quality/etc. We have some folks figuring out what things are the most desired that we lack, so we can add those with most priority... but this is where again we more than welcome feedback."
  • The results from our past three Linux distro polls
    You might think this annual poll would be fairly similar from year to year, from what distros we list to how people answer, but the results are wildly different from year to year. (At the time of the creation of each poll, we pull the top 15 distributions according to DistroWatch over the past 12 months.) Last year, the total votes tallied in at 15,574! And the winner was PCLinuxOS with Ubuntu a close second. Another interesting point is that in 2018, there were 950 votes for "other" and 122 comments compared to this year with only 367 votes for "other" and 69 comments.
  • Fedora Strategy FAQ Part 3: What does this mean for Fedora releases?
    Fedora operating system releases are (largely) time-based activity where a new base operating system (kernel, libraries, compilers) is built and tested against our Editions for functionality. This provides a new source for solutions to be built on. The base operating systems may continue to be maintained on the current 13 month life cycle — or services that extend that period may be provided in the future. A solution is never obligated to build against all currently maintained bases.
  • How open data and tools can save lives during a disaster
    If you've lived through a major, natural disaster, you know that during the first few days you'll probably have to rely on a mental map, instead of using a smartphone as an extension of your brain. Where's the closest hospital with disaster care? What about shelters? Gas stations? And how many soft story buildings—with their propensity to collapse—will you have to zig-zag around to get there? Trying to answer these questions after moving back to earthquake-prone San Francisco is why I started the Resiliency Maps project. The idea is to store information about assets, resources, and hazards in a given geographical area in a map that you can download and print out. The project contributes to and is powered by OpenStreetMap (OSM), and the project's entire toolkit is open source, ensuring that the maps will be available to anyone who wants to use them.
  • Millions of websites threatened by highly critical code-execution bug in Drupal

    Drupal is the third most-widely used CMS behind WordPress and Joomla. With an estimated 3 percent to 4 percent of the world's billion-plus websites, that means Drupal runs tens of millions of sites. Critical flaws in any CMS are popular with hackers, because the vulnerabilities can be unleashed against large numbers of sites with a single, often-easy-to-write script.

  • Avoiding the coming IoT dystopia
    Bradley Kuhn works for the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) and part of what that organization does is to think about the problems that software freedom may encounter in the future. SFC worries about what will happen with the four freedoms as things change in the world. One of those changes is already upon us: the Internet of Things (IoT) has become quite popular, but it has many dangers, he said. Copyleft can help; his talk is meant to show how. It is still an open question in his mind whether the IoT is beneficial or not. But the "deep trouble" that we are in from IoT can be mitigated to some extent by copyleft licenses that are "regularly and fairly enforced". Copyleft is not the solution to all of the problems, all of the time—no idea, no matter how great, can be—but it can help with the dangers of IoT. That is what he hoped to convince attendees with his talk. A joke that he had seen at least three times at the conference (and certainly before that as well) is that the "S" in IoT stands for security. As everyone knows by now, the IoT is not about security. He pointed to some recent incidents, including IoT baby monitors that were compromised by attackers in order to verbally threaten the parents. This is "scary stuff", he said.

KDE: Slackware's Plasma5, KDE Community 'Riot' (Matrix), Kdenlive Call for Testers/Testing

  • [Slackware] Python3 update in -current results in rebuilt Plasma5 packages in ktown
    Pat decided to update the Python 3 to version 3.7.2. This update from 3.6 to 3.7 broke binary compatibility and a lot of packages needed to be rebuilt in -current. But you all saw the ChangeLog.txt entry of course. In my ‘ktown’ repository with Plasma5 packages, the same needed to happen. I have uploaded a set of recompiled packages already, so you can safely upgrade to the latest -current as long as you also upgrade to the latest ‘ktown’. Kudos to Pat for giving me advance warning so I could already start recompiling my own stuff before he uploaded his packages.
  • Alternatives to rioting
    The KDE Community has just announced the wider integration of Matrix instant messaging into its communications infrastructure. There are instructions on the KDE Community Wiki as well. So what’s the state of modern chat with KDE-FreeBSD? The web client works pretty well in Falkon, the default browser in a KDE Plasma session on FreeBSD. I don’t like leaving browsers open for long periods of time, so I looked at the available desktop clients. Porting Quaternion to FreeBSD was dead simple. No compile warnings, nothing, just an hour of doing some boilerplate-ish things, figuring out which Qt components are needed, and doing a bunch of test builds. So that client is now available from official FreeBSD ports. The GTK-based client Fractal was already ported, so there’s choices available for native-desktop applications over the browser or Electron experience.
  • Ready to test [Kdenlive]?
    If you followed Kdenlive’s activity these last years, you know that we dedicated all our energy into a major code refactoring. During this period, which is not the most exciting since our first goal was to simply restore all the stable version’s features, we were extremely lucky to see new people joining the core team, and investing a lot of time in the project. We are now considering to release the updated version in April, with KDE Applications 19.04. There are still a few rough edges and missing features (with many new ones added as well), but we think it now reached the point where it is possible to start working with it.

Preliminary Support Allows Linux KVM To Boot Xen HVM Guests

As one of the most interesting patch series sent over by an Oracle developer in quite a while at least on the virtualization front, a "request for comments" series was sent out on Wednesday that would enable the Linux Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) to be able to boot Xen HVM guests. The 39 patches touching surprisingly just over three thousand lines of code allow for Linux's KVM to run unmodified Xen HVM images as well as development/testing of Xen guests and Xen para-virtualized drivers. This approach is different from other efforts in the past of tighter Xen+KVM integration. Read more

Servers: Kubernetes, SUSE Enterprise Storage and Microsoft/SAP

  • Kubernetes and the Cloud
    One of the questions I get asked quite often by people who are just starting or are simply not used to the “new” way things are done in IT is, “What is the cloud?” This, I think, is something you get many different answers to depending on who you ask. I like to think of it this way: The cloud is a grouping of resources (compute, storage, network) that are available to be used in a manner that makes them both highly available and scalable, either up or down, as needed. If I have an issue with a resource, I need to be able to replace that resource quickly — and this is where containers come in. They are lightweight, can be started quickly, and allow us to focus a container on a single job. Containers are also replaceable. If I have a DB container, for instance, there can’t be anything about it that makes it “special” so that when it is replaced, I do not lose operational capability.
  • iSCSI made easy with SUSE Enterprise Storage
    As your data needs continue to expand, it’s important to have a storage solution that’s both scalable and easy to manage. That’s particularly true when you’re managing common gateway resources like iSCSI that provide interfaces to storage pools built in Ceph. In this white paper, you’ll see how to use the SUSE Enterprise Storage openATTIC management console to create RADOS block devices (RBDs), pools and iSCSI interfaces for use with Linux, Windows and VMware systems.
  • Useful Resources for deploying SAP Workloads on SUSE in Azure [Ed: SUSE never truly quit being a slave of Microsoft. It's paid to remain a slave.]
    SAP applications are a crucial part of your customer’s digital transformation, but with SAP’s move to SAP S/4HANA, this can also present a challenge.