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Linux Hardware Reviews & News
Updated: 2 min 30 sec ago

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 Released With Updated KDE Desktop Bits

3 hours 22 min ago
The Netrunner Rolling Linux distribution that is based on Arch Linux / Manjaro (unlike the non-rolling release using Debian Testing) is out with a new release for this KDE-focused desktop platform...

Linux 5.1-rc6 Kernel Released In Linus Torvalds' Easter Day Message

9 hours 24 min ago
Linux 5.1-rc6 is larger than the previous release candidate, but he isn't too worried right now about the condition of the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel...

KDE Saw More System Settings Work While EGLStreams KWin Support Stole The Show

11 hours 37 min ago
Most exciting this week in KDE space was seeing KWin pick up support for the NVIDIA EGLStreams implementation for Wayland with this proprietary graphics driver. Beyond the EGLStreams KWin support were also many fixes and other improvements to the desktop landing this Easter week...

A Set Of Obscure Drivers Out-Of-Tree Since Linux 2.x Will See Mainline For Linux 5.2

15 hours 34 sec ago
Should you have any Daktronics scoreboards, video displays, or digital billboards, mainline Linux kernel support appears to be in the works...

Sam Hartman Is Debian's Newest Project Leader, Aims To "Keep Debian Fun"

15 hours 47 min ago
While initially no qualified candidates stepped forward for the 2019 Debian Project Leader elections, following the extended nomination period and voting, Sam Hartman has been elected the newest leader of Debian...

Intel i40e Driver Supporting Dynamic Device Personalization With Linux 5.2

16 hours 29 min ago
Intel's i40e / XL710 Ethernet driver will begin supporting Dynamic Device Personalization (DDP) with the upcoming Linux 5.2 kernel...

Oracle's Ksplice Live Kernel Patching Picks Up Known Exploit Detection

17 hours 3 min ago
One of the areas of Oracle Linux and its "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel" that the company continues investing in and differentiating it from upstream RHEL and alternatives is around Ksplice as their means of live kernel patching while Red Hat continues with Kpatch and SUSE with kGraft...

The NULL TTY Driver Is Coming To The Linux 5.2 Kernel

Sunday 21st of April 2019 04:00:09 AM
While initially some questions were raised over the usefulness and practicality of this driver when it was first proposed on the kernel mailing list, the NULL TTY driver is set to make its maiden voyage to mainline with the upcoming Linux 5.2 kernel cycle...

SuperTuxKart 1.0 Released For Open-Source Linux Racing

Saturday 20th of April 2019 09:53:02 PM
SuperTuxKart, the open-source racing game inspired by Mario Kart and themed around Linux/Tux, has reached its 1.0 version after being in development the past 12+ years...

JITLink Lands In LLVM 9.0

Saturday 20th of April 2019 07:20:00 PM
Being merged into the LLVM code-base this Saturday is JITLink, a just-in-time linker for parsing object files and letting their contents run in a target process...

Panfrost DRM Driver Being Added To Linux 5.2 For Midgard / Bifrost Graphics

Saturday 20th of April 2019 03:08:17 PM
Not only is the longtime Lima DRM driver for Arm Mali 400/450 graphics set to finally premiere with the Linux 5.2 kernel, but the Panfrost DRM driver is also being mainlined for the newer Mali graphics hardware...

Linux 5.2 Is Introducing The Fieldbus Subsystem

Saturday 20th of April 2019 11:18:16 AM
A new subsystem queued for introduction in the upcoming Linux 5.2 cycle is the Fieldbus Subsystem, which is initially being added to the staging area of the kernel...

NVIDIA 418.52.05 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan Ray-Tracing To Non-RTX GPUs

Saturday 20th of April 2019 10:56:56 AM
As we've been expecting from NVIDIA's recent DXR ray-tracing support back-ported to Pascal/Volta GPUs, there's now a NVIDIA Linux driver beta that offers VK_NV_ray_tracing for pre-Turing graphics processors...

In 2019, Most Linux Distributions Still Aren't Restricting Dmesg Access

Saturday 20th of April 2019 10:37:43 AM
Going back to the late Linux 2.6 kernel days has been the CONFIG_DMESG_RESTRICT (or for the past number of years, renamed to CONFIG_SECURITY_DMESG_RESTRICT) Kconfig option to restrict access to dmesg in the name of security and not allowing unprivileged users from accessing this system log. While it's been brought up from time to time, Linux distributions are still generally allowing any user access to dmesg even though it may contain information that could help bad actors exploit the system...

The PinePhone Linux Smartphone Dev Kit Can Run Wayland's Weston

Saturday 20th of April 2019 05:19:36 AM
While on one side of the table is the Purism Librem 5 Linux smartphone on the high-price/high-end side, the Pine64 folks continue working on the PinePhone as a lower-end Linux smartphone. A new video now shows the PinePhone running on Linux 5.0 with Wayland's Weston...

Linux 5.1 Picking Up Keyboard Mappings For Full-Screen, Toggle Display Keys

Saturday 20th of April 2019 04:02:20 AM
Coming as a late addition to the Linux 5.1 kernel are some long overdue keyboard key mappings for different functionality...

It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections

Friday 19th of April 2019 11:49:22 PM
While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections...

AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2

Friday 19th of April 2019 04:40:45 PM
Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release...

Mesa's Vulkan Drivers See More Extension Work Ahead Of The 19.1 Branching

Friday 19th of April 2019 12:49:17 PM
Mesa 19.1 is due to be released at the end of May and for that to be the feature freeze is in two weeks followed by the weekly release candidates. With the feature development ending soon for this next quarterly Mesa release, the Radeon "RADV" and Intel "ANV" Vulkan driver developers in particular have been quite busy on their remaining feature work...

Qt 6 Might Drop Their Short-Lived Universal Windows Platform Support

Friday 19th of April 2019 12:38:48 PM
While the Universal Windows Platform (UWP) is needed for targeting the Xbox One, Microsoft HoloLens, and IoT, The Qt Company is thinking about gutting out their UWP support in the big Qt 6 tool-kit update...

More in Tux Machines

Review: Alpine Linux 3.9.2

Alpine Linux is different in some important ways compared to most other distributions. It uses different libraries, it uses a different service manager (than most), it has different command line tools and a custom installer. All of this can, at first, make Alpine feel a bit unfamiliar, a bit alien. But what I found was that, after a little work had been done to get the system up and running (and after a few missteps on my part) I began to greatly appreciate the distribution. Alpine is unusually small and requires few resources. Even the larger Extended edition I was running required less than 100MB of RAM and less than a gigabyte of disk space after all my services were enabled. I also appreciated that Alpine ships with some security features, like PIE, and does not enable any services it does not need to run. I believe it is fair to say this distribution requires more work to set up. Installing Alpine is not a point-n-click experience, it's more manual and requires a bit of typing. Not as much as setting up Arch Linux, but still more work than average. Setting up services requires a little more work and, in some cases, reading too since Alpine works a little differently than mainstream Linux projects. I repeatedly found it was a good idea to refer to the project's wiki to learn which steps were different on Alpine. What I came away thinking at the end of my trial, and I probably sound old (or at least old fashioned), is Alpine Linux reminds me of what got me into running Linux in the first place, about 20 years ago. Alpine is fast, light, and transparent. It offered very few surprises and does almost nothing automatically. This results in a little more effort on our parts, but it means that Alpine does not do things unless we ask it to perform an action. It is lean, efficient and does not go around changing things or trying to guess what we want to do. These are characteristics I sometimes miss these days in the Linux ecosystem. Read more

today's howtos

Linux v5.1-rc6

It's Easter Sunday here, but I don't let little things like random major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow. The occasional scuba trip? Sure. But everybody sitting around eating traditional foods? No. You have to have priorities. There's only so much memma you can eat even if your wife had to make it from scratch because nobody eats that stuff in the US. Anyway, rc6 is actually larger than I would have liked, which made me go back and look at history, and for some reason that's not all that unusual. We recently had similar rc6 bumps in both 4.18 and 5.0. So I'm not going to worry about it. I think it's just random timing of pull requests, and almost certainly at least partly due to the networking pull request in here (with just over a third of the changes being networking-related, either in drivers or core networking). Read more Also: Linux 5.1-rc6 Kernel Released In Linus Torvalds' Easter Day Message

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