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Updated: 1 hour 12 min ago

New Ports Bring Linux to Arm Laptops, Android to the Pi

1 hour 26 min ago
The latest Linux-related ports include an AArch64-Laptops project that enables owners of Windows-equipped Arm laptops and tablets to load Ubuntu. There’s also a Kickstarter project to develop a Raspberry Pi friendly version of Google’s low-end Android 9 Pi Go stack. Even Windows is spreading its wings. A third-party project has released a WoA installer that enables a full Windows 10 image to run on the Pi.

Games: Hollow Knight: Silksong, Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus and Dusk

1 hour 33 min ago

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New Releases and Video: Archman and ArcoLinux

1 hour 35 min ago

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Mir 1.1.1 Release Candidate

1 hour 37 min ago
  • Mir 1.1.1 - release candidate

    I’ve just kicked off the process for a bugfix release of Mir. An initial release-candidate is currently building in ppa:mir-tream/rc.

  • Mir 1.1.1 RC1 Has Fixes For PostmarketOS, Demo Shells Using Wayland

    Mir 1.1 was released back in December as the first post-1.0 feature update while now preparing for release is the Mir 1.1.1 maintenance milestone.

    Canonical's Alan Griffiths has tagged the Mir 1.1.1 release candidate today as the newest bug-fix release. Highlights include:

    - Fixing issues with PostmarketOS support, particularly around its usage of the musl C library rather than Glibc. PostmarketOS is the mobile Linux distribution derived from Alpine Linux that's been having a steady following in recent times and running on the Nexus 5/7, Nokia N9, and other devices.

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Programming: Choosing Between Go and Rust, Python, R-tree and R

1 hour 47 min ago
  • The developer’s dilemma: Choosing between Go and Rust

    If you were to make a list of important programming languages that have appeared in the past decade, Go and Rust would almost certainly be featured on it.

    Similarly, if you were to sit down and think about which programming languages are best suited to developing secure, microservices-friendly frameworks or applications today, you might find yourself debating between Go and Rust.

    If you’re struggling to decide whether Go or Rust is a better language for your development needs, keep reading. This post compares Go and Rust, explaining how they are similar, how they’re different, and what each can do for you.

  • pprint.isrecursive: Check if object requires recursive representation
  • Performance benchmark on mdds R-tree

    I must say that I am overall very pleased with the performance of R-tree. I can already envision various use cases where R-tree will be immensely useful. One area I’m particularly interested in is spreadsheet application’s formula dependency tracking mechanism which involves tracing through chained dependency targets to broadcast cell value changes. Since the spreadsheet organizes its data in terms of row and column positions which is 2-dimensional in nature, R-tree can probably be useful for speeding things up in that area.

  • In memory of Monty Hall

    To explore this a bit further and to have a nice exercise with R, a small simulation of games is created.

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Governments Are Spending Billions on Software They Can Get with Freedom

1 hour 56 min ago
It’s an issue, because it’s not going to end. Governments are claiming problems and issues in transferring to free software, and in doing that, they keep paying millions and millions of dollars each year, and continue to do so indefinitely; They have no plans to switch to free (as in freedom) locally-developed alternatives.

How to Install Pagekit CMS on Debian 9

1 hour 56 min ago
Pagekit is modern, intuitive, modular, and flexible open source (MIT license) CMS built with Symfony components and Vue.js. In this tutorial, we will walk you through the Pagekit CMS installation process on a Debian 9 (stretch) operating system by using NGINX as a web server, MariaDB as a database server, and optionally you can secure transport layer by using acme.sh client and Let's Encrypt certificate.

Software: Pitivi, PackageKit, 23 Electron Applications You Should Know About and More

2 hours 17 min ago
  • Polishing Pitivi's viewer

    In the Pitivi video editor, the viewer is quite important, as it shows the video. Our viewer also shows a discreet frame around a clip selected in the timeline, making it easy to resize and position the video of the clip by dragging. Below is the story of the viewer updates in the past year.

    [...]

    Normally the viewer is used to display the project video at the playhead position, but we also use it to display the start or end margins of a clip when it is being trimmed.

    [...]

    Pitivi benefits from the GStreamer multimedia framework used on most Linux desktops and we contribute back in multiple ways. We could use some more hands on Pitivi. Contributions of any type would be greatly appreciated. Come chat with us. If you're a student, you can join us doing a GSoC internship this summer!

  • PackageKit is dead, long live, well, something else

    It’s probably no surprise to many of you that PackageKit has been in maintenance mode for quite some time. Although started over ten years ago (!) it’s not really had active maintenance since about 2014. Of course, I’ve still been merging PRs and have been slinging tarballs over the wall every few months, but nothing new was happening with the project, and I’ve worked on many other things since.

    I think it’s useful for a little retrospective. PackageKit was conceived as an abstraction layer over about a dozen different package management frameworks. Initially it succeeded, with a lot of front ends UIs being written for the PackageKit API, making the Linux desktop a much nicer place for many years. Over the years, most package managers have withered and died, and for the desktop at least really only two remain, .rpm and .deb. The former being handled by the dnf PackageKit backend, and the latter by aptcc.

  • How to watch for releases of upstream projects

    Do you want to know when a new version of your favorite project is released? Do you want to make your job as packager easier? If so, this article is for you. It introduces you to the world of release-monitoring.org. You’ll see how it can help you catch up with upstream releases.

  • 23 Electron Applications You Should Know About

    Here we present the best Electron applications available for Linux desktops, including Ubuntu, as well as macOS and Windows too.

    We’ve written about a lot of diverse Electron apps over the past few years, ranging from desktop podcast clients to popular IDEs.

    Not everyone appreciates Electron’s cross-platform versatility as much as we do. Heck, I once wrote an opinion piece explaining why Electron apps aren’t evil. Some have issues with the amount of memory Electron apps use up, the CPU cycles they eat up, and the disk size they take up.

    But there are those who don’t mind using the odd Electron app here or there, to plug a gap. So I figured a roundup spotlighting some to the very best Electron applications available for Linux (and other OSes) could still be of interest.

  • 10 Benefits of Publishing Your App in the Snap Store [Video]

    Canonical's Alan Pope lists 10 benefits of publishing apps in the Snap store. His talk was recorded at the FOSDEM Linux conference in Belgium.

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Server: Network Function Virtualization. Little Backup Box, Oracle and Red Hat

2 hours 21 min ago
  • NFV, virtualized central offices, and the Need for VNF Data Protection

    Network Function Virtualization (NFV) is designed to provide value around modularity and flexibility. NFV can allow different radio access networks and customer applications to run on one physical network so that the 5G revolution becomes a reality. Critical enterprise compliance requirements, including data protection and disaster recovery, must still be met during this race to modernization.

  • Little Backup Box: A Handful of Improvements and a Dash of PHP

    My every Little Backup Box improvement project starts with the same thought, It does the job but... This time around I wanted to fix and improve several things. Firstly, since the DLNA feature wasn't working at all, I removed it altogether a while ago. Subsequently, I missed the ability to browse and view freshly backed up photos on many occasions. Secondly, I'm not a big fan of Python. There is no particular reason for that, I just never really warmed up to the language. On the other hand, PHP has always been my personal favorite and go-to scripting language, no matter what some professional developers think of it. So I wanted to swap the Python-based Little Backup Box web interface with a simpler, and arguably more elegant, version written in PHP. Finally, Little Backup Box theoretically can be installed on any Linux machine running a Debian-based Linux distribution. But due to some values hard-wired in the scripts, deploying Little Backup Box on any system other than Raspbian requires some manual tweaking. This is something I wanted to fix as well.

  • What is Oracle Linux? And where to Download it

    Oracle Linux is based on and fully compatible with Red Hat Enterprise Linux ( source code and binaries ). It has the exact same package as the same version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and has the exact same source code as the Red Hat distribution. There are approximately 1000 packages in the distribution. Even if the source code of the two is compared byte by byte, there is no difference. The only change is to remove the trademark and copyright information. So, that’s why we can call it an Oracle Enterprise Linux.

    Oracle Linux, the first version of Oracle released in early 2006, one of the Linux distributions, to better support Oracle software and hardware support. Because of the enterprise-level support plan UBL (Unbreakable Linux) provided by Oracle, many people called it an indestructible Linux.

  • Linux chops are crucial in containerized world, says Red Hat executive

    How are companies in 2019 going to make multicloud a practical reality? The jury seems to have selected containers (a virtualized method for running distribute applications). This is why legacies and startups alike are flooding the market with container products. Which should companies choose?

    Ever see those Red Hat Inc. T-shirts that say “Containers Are Linux”? That pretty much sums up Red Hat’s bid for the containerization championship.

    “As you move into that space of Kubernetes, and containers and orchestration, you really want someone who knows Linux,” said Stefanie Chiras (pictured), vice president and general manager of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux business unit, known as RHEL, at Red Hat.

    Chiras spoke with Dave Vellante (@dvellante) and Stu Miniman (@stu), co-hosts of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile livestreaming studio, during the IBM Think event in San Francisco. They discussed RHEL 8 and the crucial importance of Linux for containers. (* Disclosure below.)

  • Red Hat Delivers Unified Integration Platform for Cloud-Native Application Development
  • Red Hat Extends Datacenter Infrastructure Control, Automation with Latest Version of Red Hat CloudForms

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Linspire CE 8.0 Office 365 Released

2 hours 26 min ago
today the Linspire team is pleased to announce the release of Cloud Edition 8.0 Office 365. This is an update to our CE Office - by far one of our most popular business releases for 2018. We have worked diligently to thoroughly integrate Microsoft’s web services into this product. Who was this designed for? For our business and education users who rely on Microsoft’s web services in their offices and classrooms. CE Office 365 offers the standard Microsoft Office online platform married to the stability and security of the Linux desktop.

How To Downgrade Packages To A Specific Version With Apt In Debian, Ubuntu Or Linux Mint

2 hours 26 min ago
This article explains how to downgrade a package to a specific version using apt, in Debian, Ubuntu or Linux Mint (from the command line).

RISC-V on the Verge of Broad Adoption

2 hours 50 min ago

There are major hurdles to overcome when bringing a new processor architecture to market. Today’s fast-paced development practices demand that processor offerings be stable with the promise of a long market lifetime. Further, they must come to market with substantial support in the form of development tools, software libraries, operating systems, emulators, debuggers, and more. The emerging RISC-V instruction set architecture has faced and is overcoming those hurdles and is poised to rapidly gain broad acceptance across the design industry.

There are several reasons the RISC-V ISA has been garnering a lot of interest. For one, the ISA is open source, meaning that anyone can design a processor to implement the ISA without paying a licensing fee. This opens the ISA to a huge, worldwide design community that can review, correct, and enhance the architecture over time. Yet because only the ISA is open source, developers are free to safeguard their hardware design’s intellectual property and keep it proprietary for commercialization.

Also: Data Conspiracy RISC | User Error 59

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New Tabbed Layout Coming On LibreOffice v6.2

2 hours 56 min ago
LibreOffice, the most popular open source office suite program is set to feature a new look and feel in the coming v6.2 release, called the tabbed layout. As of now, the current stable version is in v6.1.4 and its default look currently mimics the traditional menu-based GUI and some toolbars.

Devices: Plug Computers, Estone, Purism’s Plan for Privacy

2 hours 57 min ago
  • Sheeva64 is an $89 tiny headless PC that plugs into an AC outlet

    Plug Computers are tiny PCs that you could easily mistake for an AC power adapter, because they plug directly into a wall outlet and typically don’t include video output. Instead these small, low power, “headless” computers usually run some sort of Linux-based operating system allowing you to use the little PCs as file servers or for other simple jobs.

    One popular option about a decade ago was called the SheevaPlug, and it was a device built around a 1.2 GHz Marvell Kirkwood 6281 ARM9 processor.

  • i.MX8M-driven Pico-ITX SBC features dual-DSP audio module

    Estone is launching an “EMB-2238” Pico-ITX board for audio and voice control applications that runs Linux on an i.MX8M and offers a dual-DSP audio hub and DAC, 40-pin GPIO, and optional PoE and second GbE.

    Toledo, Ohio based Estone Technology (known for its former Habey brand) offers a variety of Linux-friendly Pico-ITX boards, including boards based on the i.MX6 (EMB-2230), i.MX6 UL (EMB2200) models, and Intel Cherry Trail EMB-2610. The company recently announced (via Electronics Weekly) an EMB-2238 board with the same 100 x 72mm form factor. The SBC builds on the audio strengths of NXP’s i.MX8M SoC with the help of high-end audio circuitry from Cirrus Logic.

  • How Purism avoids the FaceTime remote camera viewing

    is not Free Software – with its source code released so that anyone can verify their security claims, like the one we use at Purism – how can you trust what cannot be verified?

    At Purism, both our Librem laptops, and the upcoming Librem 5 phone include this rather simple switch, that makes it remarkably easy to guarantee that the camera and microphone have no electrical circuit enabled.

    See? Powerful simple privacy protection built into all Purism products by default.

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Security: Updates, Patches and Bugs

3 hours 2 min ago

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A Line in the Sand

3 hours 26 min ago
Linux Journal was born in one fight and grew through a series of others. Our first fight was for freedom. That began in 1993, when Phil Hughes started work toward a free software magazine. The fight for free software was still there when that magazine was born as Linux Journal in April 1994. Then a second fight began. That one was against all forms of closed and proprietary software, including the commercial UNIX variants that Linux would eventually defeat. .........................

Wrestler Booker T Sues Activision For Copyright Infringement Over Fairly Generic Character Depiction

3 hours 31 min ago

It's old hat by now to point out that on matters of copyright far too many people are unaware of the nuances of the law as to what constitutes infringement and what doesn't. While this is generally true, it's all the more so when it comes to how copyright covers specific characters or settings. For instance, George Lucas may have a copyright claim on the specific character of Darth Vader, but he most certainly does not have any claim to the more generic black-armored space-magician with a laser sword and a bad attitude. Copyright covers expression, in other words, not mere ideas.

Which brings us to ex-WWE wrestler Booker T and his lawsuit against Activision over a G.I. Bro character he created and a character in Black Ops 4.

Booker T. Huffman has filed a lawsuit against video game publisher Activision for allegedly stealing his “G.I Bro” character in the Call Of Duty: Black Ops 4 video game.

Huffman filed a lawsuit today against Activision Publishing, Inc, Activision Blizzard, Inc., and Major League Gaming Corp.

The lawsuit alleges that Booker T’s character G.I Bro was copied by the Black Ops character David “Prophet” Wilkes. Booker T used the G.I Bro character in the 90s as a professional wrestler, and also created a comic book based on the character in 2015.

You can read the entire filing below, but I will tell you right up front that this isn't a strong case. Booker T is asserting copyright infringement over a character that does not share a name with his, does not share a backstory with his, and does not exist in the same setting as his. Instead, it appears the only thing the two characters do share is that both are African American gunslingers in combat gear with long hair. Seriously, that's about it. The filing itself uses these side by side images to demonstrate the "blatant copying" that has occurred.

If you think there is any kind of unique identifier in Activision's image on the right that somehow makes it a clear copy of Booker T's character, you're a crazy person. Again, to put it bluntly, it's just an African American guy with long hair in combat gear. Complicating Booker T's suit further, this is an established character in the Black Ops ethos, with this supposedly infringing depiction being simply some imagery around when Prophet was younger. The character is Prophet, full stop. It's not G.I. Bro at all and nobody is going to think otherwise, except apparently for Booker T and whatever lawyers he convinced to file this lawsuit.

And none of that even touches Booker T's own character's name, a clear homage and reference to G.I. Joe. One wonders if Hasbro wants to get involved at this point, given the stink that's being made over intellectual property rights.



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Wine 4.2 Released

3 hours 31 min ago
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 4.2 is now available.

  • Wine 4.2 Released With Unicode String Normalization & ECC Crypto Key Support

    The second bi-weekly development release following last month's stable debut of Wine 4.0 is now available for testing.

    Wine 4.2 was just release and adds Unicode string normalization support, support for ECC cryptographic keys, support for mixing 32/64-bit DLLs in the load path, futex-based implementations of more synchronization primitives, and the usual smothering of bug fixes.

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GNOME Desktop: Security Internship, History of GNOME and People Who Work on librsvg

3 hours 41 min ago
  • GNOME Security Internship - Update 5

    This project started with a simple on/off switch in control center that entirely enabled or disabled the USB protection. A respectively so called always on and always off.

    Later on we introduced a smarter protection level that was active only when the user session was locked.

    While an always on protection seemed a good idea on paper it turned out that the advantages compared to the lock screen protection were very slim.

    When the screen is locked both protections have the same behaviour. They only differentiate when the user session is unlocked.

  • Pick a clock, any clock.

    After listening to the latest episode of Emmanuel’s podcast on the History of GNOME, nostalgia got the better of me, and I decided to dig out the GNOME 1.4 usability study that we ran at Sun Microsystems in March 2001, and make it available online again.

  • Who wrote librsvg?

    The shitty thing about a gradual rewrite is that a few people end up "owning" all the lines of source code. Hopefully this post is a little acknowledgment of the people that made librsvg possible.

    The charts are made with the incredible tool git-of-theseus — thanks to @norwin@mastodon.art for digging it up! Its README also points to a Hercules plotter with awesome graphs. You know, for if you needed something to keep your computer busy during the weekend.

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Slackware Removal of Lumina Desktop and Additional New Packages/Versions

3 hours 45 min ago
  • Lumina Desktop will be removed from my -current repository

    The Lumina Desktop is part of the TrueOS project, a FreeBSD variant. I packaged version 1.4.0.p1 for Slackware and it is part of the Plasma5 variant of my Slackware Live Edition.

    I noticed a while ago that Lumina would no longer start but it was low on my priority list to try and fix it.

    Today I found the time to look into this, but a recompilation against the latest Qt5 and other libraries, altough error-free, would not make the Lumina Desktop start successfully: it will start to load, but then you’ll hear a beep and you’re dumped at the command prompt or at the graphical login screen without evidence of what happened.

  • Valentine present for Slackers

    Today is Valentine’s Day. A moment to give some extra attention to people that are dear to you.

    In my case, that’s everyone who loves, uses, supports, advocates or develops Slackware Linux. For all of you, I uploaded “KDE-5_19.02” to the ‘ktown‘ repository. There’s some updates in there that might interest you, see below.
    If you do not (want to) run or install Slackware-current, I will make sure that a new ISO of the Slackware Live Plasma5 Edition will be available around the weekend. That way, you can safely try it out without having to touch your hard drive.

    As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft and IBM Spin/PR

  • Windows 10 Will Finally Offer Easy Access to Linux Files [Ed: No, this is more WSL entrapment. They try to prevent people from using proper GNU/Linux with the actual kernel, either standalone or dual-boot. This is also about surveillance on one's files, keys, keystrokes, everything.]
  • Zowe Makes Mainframe Evergreen [Ed: Swapnil Bhartiya greenwashing and openwashing 2-in-1]
    Zowe also offers a vendor-agnostic experience allowing users to mix and match tooling and technologies. It provides interoperability, through the latest web technologies, products, and solutions from multiple vendors, and it allows developers to use the familiar, industry-standard, open source tools to access mainframe resources and services.
  • The ibmvnic driver with SR-IOV is now supported by SLES 12 and SLES 15 on IBM POWER9 processor-based systems
    The ibmvnic driver enables PowerVM Single Root I/O Virtualizations (SR-IOV) for improved network capabilities including reduced systems processor utilization, decreased network latency, and enforcement of network Quality of Service.

Games: Hollow Knight: Silksong, Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus and Dusk

New Releases and Video: Archman and ArcoLinux

Mir 1.1.1 Release Candidate

  • Mir 1.1.1 - release candidate
    I’ve just kicked off the process for a bugfix release of Mir. An initial release-candidate is currently building in ppa:mir-tream/rc.
  • Mir 1.1.1 RC1 Has Fixes For PostmarketOS, Demo Shells Using Wayland
    Mir 1.1 was released back in December as the first post-1.0 feature update while now preparing for release is the Mir 1.1.1 maintenance milestone. Canonical's Alan Griffiths has tagged the Mir 1.1.1 release candidate today as the newest bug-fix release. Highlights include: - Fixing issues with PostmarketOS support, particularly around its usage of the musl C library rather than Glibc. PostmarketOS is the mobile Linux distribution derived from Alpine Linux that's been having a steady following in recent times and running on the Nexus 5/7, Nokia N9, and other devices.