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Updated: 39 min 20 sec ago

How to Use KDE Connect with MATE on Ubuntu and Debian

3 hours 23 min ago
KDE Connect is an excellent way to connect your Android phone and your Linux PC. Set it up with proper integration on the MATE Linux desktop.

Google Pulls Android From Huawei, Deals Blow to Mobile Business

4 hours 26 min ago
Alphabet Inc.’s Google will cut off the supply of hardware and some software services to Huawei. That will severely curtail the sale of Huawei smartphones abroad, though it remains a sliver of the Chinese company’s business.

Linux 5.2-rc1

5 hours 25 min ago

Nothing particularly odd going on this merge window. I had some travel
in the middle of it, but to offset that I had a new faster test-build
setup, and most of the pull requests came in early (thank you) so my
travels didn't actually end up affecting the merge window all that
much.

We did have a few late pull requests too, but since that meshed fairly
well with my schedule as per above, and people generally made the
proper noises ("sorry for late pull request, I had good reasons: xyz")
I didn't mind this time. But let's try to not repeat that, ok?

Things look fairly normal. Just about two thirds of the patch is
drivers (all over), with the bulk of the rest being arch updates,
tooling, documentation and vfs/filesystem updates, of which there were
more than usual (the unicode tables for ext4 case insensitivity do end
up being a big part of the "bulk" side).

But there's core networking, kernel and vm changes too - it's just
that the other areas tend to simply be much bulkier. Drivers etc tend
to just have a ton more lines to them, if only by virtue of there
being so many of them (although admittedly also sometimes because some
drivers tend to just be very verbose and have a lot of register
definitions etc).

Also: Linux 5.2-rc1 Kernel Released With Case-Insensitive EXT4, New Intel HW & RTW88 WiFi

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How to Encrypt Linux Partitions with VeraCrypt on Ubuntu

5 hours 53 min ago
If you have sensitive data on your computer, it should be protected by encryption. In this article, I will show you how to encrypt a partition in Linux using a VeraCrypt.

10 valuable cloud computing certifications

6 hours 22 min ago
Which IT certifications will boost your cloud computing credentials – and salary?

Kernel prepatch 5.2-rc1

6 hours 46 min ago
Linus has released the 5.2-rc2 kernel prepatch and closed the merge window for this development cycle. "Nothing particularly odd going on this merge window. I had some travel in the middle of it, but to offset that I had a new faster test-build setup, and most of the pull requests came in early (thank you) so my travels didn't actually end up affecting the merge window all that much."

How to Install Shopware with NGINX and Let’s encrypt on Debian 9

8 hours 22 min ago
Shopware is a widely used professional open source e-commerce software. This tutorial will show you how to install Shopware Community Edition (CE) on a Debian 9 system by using NGINX as a web server and how to secure the website with a free Let's encrypt SSL certificate.

Required gamer viewing: The history of M2’s Japanese retro-port empire

8 hours 47 min ago
  • You may not know Japanese game studio M2 by name, but you've probably played one of its retro-revival projects. [credit: My Life In Gaming ]

If you speak a certain language about classic video games, you probably know about M2, a Japanese game studio responsible for dozens of impressive arcade and console ports to newer home consoles. Yet even if you don't, a new hour-long documentary about the studio should still be considered required viewing for anybody who loves the best Japanese games of the '80s and '90s.

Produced by My Life In Gaming, a video channel known for a laser focus on retro gaming, the M2 Complete Works documentary (embedded below) is a sweeping, decades-long look at a game studio renowned among dedicated gaming fans. That's because M2 has produced some of the most impressive ports, emulations, and even fully blown remakes of classic series by Sega, Konami, Capcom, and SNK. (Listing them all would bury the embedded video below, but to get a sense of how impressive M2's work is, look into the Sega 3D Classics Collection. This series saw M2 deconstruct many original Sega arcade and console games, then fully rebuild them with pitch-perfect emulation and 3D depth effects for the Nintendo 3DS.)

The MLIG production duo of Coury Carlson and Marc Duddleson fill their documentary with original insights from M2 staffers, starting with the studio's college-aged efforts to build an arcade-perfect version of Gauntlet for the Sega Genesis and working up to its acquisition of dozens of '90s industry vets to keep the studio going through the '00s and '10s.

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Red Hat’s Jim Whitehurst on the IBM Merger, SUSE and Ubuntu

8 hours 53 min ago
At Red Hat Summit, ITPro Today sat down with Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst and talked about life after the IBM merger, hybrid cloud and the competition.

Google reportedly ends business with Huawei, will cut it off from Play Store

9 hours 56 min ago

Enlarge / Huawei's latest flagship, the P30 Pro. (credit: Huawei)

President Trump issued an executive order last week banning "foreign adversaries" from doing telecommunication business in the US. The move was widely understood as a ban on Huawei products, and now we're starting to see the fallout. According to a report from Reuters, Google has "suspended" business with Huawei, and the company will be locked out of Google's Android ecosystem. It's the ZTE ban all over again.

Reuters details the fallout from Trump's order, saying "Huawei Technologies Co Ltd will immediately lose access to updates to the Android operating system, and the next version of its smartphones outside of China will also lose access to popular applications and services including the Google Play Store and Gmail app."

Huawei's loss of access "to updates" is most likely a reference to Android Q, which hardware manufacturers get early access to. Since Android is open source, Huawei could resume development once the source code comes out. The real killer is the loss of the Google Play Store and Google Play Services, which unlocks access to the billions of Android apps and popular Google apps like Gmail and Maps. Reuters claims this will only happen to "the next version" of Huawei's smartphones, presumably meaning existing devices with the Play Store will continue to work.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

OSS Leftovers

10 hours 24 min ago
  • Limor Fried, AC2SN, is Recipient of 2019 Women in Open Source Award

    Nominations for this year’s awards were accepted for two categories: “Academic” for those currently enrolled in a college or university, and “Community” for those working on or volunteering with projects related to open source. A panel of judges determined finalists based on nomination criteria, and the public voted to determine the award winners.

  • Introducing GopenPGP, an open source encryption library for native applications

    Open source is a core principle of ProtonMail. We’re excited to make even more of our code available for independent inspection and use by the developer community.
    In 2016, ProtonMail became the maintainer of OpenPGP.js, the world’s most widely used Javascript email encryption library. Since then we have updated the library with new features, such as streaming encryption; assisted developers to adopt the library in their own applications; and submitted the library to independent security audits.

    Today, we are happy to announce another open source project that will be maintained by ProtonMail: GopenPGP. This project consists of a high-level OpenPGP library, as well as a fork of the golang crypto library. We started this project to make it easier for mobile and desktop developers to use OpenPGP encryption in their apps.

  • Gab's New Strategy: Fork Open-Source Software And Add Bitcoin

    After Keybase announced integration of Stellar on its platform, Gab has threatened to fork the open-source chat software and swap its XLM wallet...

  • Seven Major Trends in the Cryptoasset Industry, According to ConsenSys

    Web 3.0 Development Will Mostly Be Open-Sourced, But “Not Free”

    As confirmed by ConsenSys, open-source projects like OpenSSL Software and also open-source blockchain and crypto-related initiatives are, for the most part, operating on relatively low budgets due to lack of adequate funding.

    Although the management at ConsenSys believes Web 3.0, an evolving set of protocols and standards for the new internet, will be created mainly through open-source development projects, it also noted that the world wide web of the future will not be developed “for free.”

    On May 11, 2019, Ethereum co-founders Vitalik Buterin and Joseph Lubin announced they had donated 1,000 ether (each) to Moloch DAO, an initiative aimed at acquiring funding for the ongoing development of Ethereum’s open-source ecosystem.

  • UPenn Medicine's AI tool for data analytics is open-source, free to the public

    An automated system that uses machine learning for data analysis is completely open-source and free to use, thanks to the Institute for Biomedical Informatics at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    Penn AI is designed to be used by anyone interested in AI, regardless of experience level, from high school students to trained researchers. Users can either import their own datasets for analysis within the tool or use one of the hundreds provided by UPenn.

  • Former Chef Software CTO talks IT automation, open source

    Adam Jacob: I'll eventually start another company and do something in enterprise software, because that's where my expertise is, and that's what I like. But I don't know exactly what it'll be or when.

    We have to build the system that makes people effective at adopting new technology -- whatever it is, wherever it may be in the stack -- that they need to run their business more effectively, instead of just the next platform.

    Things like serverless are interesting, because they point the way to the user experience, and they're going to get adopted and have value. Are they the future of enterprise computing? Maybe for a minute. But then, there'll be something else. And until we get good at navigating those transitions, which we're completely bad at right now, I don't know that it matters.

  • XJTLU brings Moodle - one of the world's most popular open source learning platform - event to China for first time

    On May 19, Dr Dougiamas, founder and CEO of Moodle, will deliver the keynote address at China's inaugural MoodleMoot, a conference held around the world to encourage collaboration and sharing of best practices of Moodle. China MoodleMoot, part of XJTLU's 2019 Annual Conference on Higher Education Innovation, will see Dr Dougiamas share his experience in using technology to transform teaching and learning.

    Dr Dougiamas, who developed the Moodle software as part of his PhD in Australia and went on to release it to the world as an open source technology in 2002, says he is looking forward to discussing the future of Moodle in China. "Anecdotally, we know many people use Moodle in China - we hope to see many of them at the first China MoodleMoot to help plan the future of Moodle, and open technology in general, in China," he says.

  • Acquia Acquires Mautic, Open-Source Marketing Automation Firm

    Hurley adds that “advancements in AI, voice, and connected devices” are raising consumer expectations, and claims that what Drupal did for the web, Elastic did for search and MongoDB did for databases, Mautic is now doing for marketing automation.

  • Acquia Delivers Open Source Framework for Contextual Commerce
  • Why Drupal matters

    After a number of complaints from the Drupal community, the Drupal Association finally removed the seemingly odd tagline “community plumbing” from its home page a few years ago (the word “plumbing” doesn’t make good SEO for a digital platform, you see).

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Databases: NoSQL, EnterpriseDB and RavenDB

10 hours 28 min ago
  • Top Open source NoSQL database programs

    NoSql, it stands for Not Only SQL, refers to the non-relational database. The next generation database mainly addresses several key points: non-relational, distributed, open source, and horizontally scalable. The non-relational database has developed very rapidly due to its own characteristics. The NoSQL database was created to solve the challenges brought by the multiple data types of large-scale data collection, especially the big data application problem. It also supports easy replication, simple APIs, final consistency (non-ACID), and large data. It is stored by us with the most key-values, and of course other document types, column stores, graph databases, XML databases, and so on. Here are some top available NoSQL database programs in Open source or free category.

  • We need a new type of open source event - here's why

    Open source events tend to focus on developers, this needs to change says EnterpriseDB's Jan Karremans

  • RavenDB Adds Pull Replication and Distributed Online Counters to Its Open Source NoSQL Document Database Offering

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FOSS in Education and Sharing

10 hours 31 min ago
  • The Untapped Potential of Making and Makerspaces

    Makerspaces are physical locations with equipment that students can use to undertake do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. Arguably, they have been around for decades; we just haven’t used the name makerspace. At my institution, the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, we’ve had a student-run DIY craft shop on our campus for more than 20 years.

    The difference between older forms of makerspaces like that craft shop and emerging ones is that the latter focus more heavily on digital making, such as 3-D design and printing, digital fabrication (sometimes called “FabLabs”), or the programming of open-source electronic hardware like the Arduino microcontroller. What is also new are the maker practices or principles of: 1) licensing digital designs and how-to instructions under a Creative Commons or similar copyright license and 2) openly sharing those designs through internet-enabled, cloud-based maker websites. Licenses chosen usually permit the sharing of the work with author attribution and, in some cases, permit new users to adapt and remix the work for other purposes. For example, at Thingiverse.com, 3-D modelers openly share their digital designs in this manner.

  • Global Learning Xprize splits $10M purse for best teaching app for disadvantaged kids

    These finalists were then subjected to field testing in Tanzania, where 8,000 Pixel C tablets generously donated by Google for the purpose were distributed to communities where teaching was hardest to come by and literacy rates lowest.

  • Tech That Makes Us Better Humans: JavaScript, Shudder, Chat Apps, Concordia, Signia

    Technology is a medium; sometimes it’s a humanizing, enchanting one. “Something about the interior life of a computer remains infinitely interesting to me; it’s not romantic, but it is a romance,” writes Paul Ford in his WIRED essay “Why I (Still) Love Tech.” “You flip a bunch of microscopic switches really fast and culture pours out.” To accompany Ford’s essay, we reached out to a bunch of people to ask them about the technology they love—the tools that make them better at being human. Here’s what we heard back.

  • Open-source RNA Analysis Tool Takes Root in Plant Biology

    An open-source RNA analysis platform has been successfully used on plant cells for the first time - a breakthrough that could herald a new era of fundamental research and bolster efforts to engineer more efficient food and biofuel crop plants.

    The technology, called Drop-seq, is a method for measuring the RNA present in individual cells, allowing scientists to see what genes are being expressed and how this relates to the specific functions of different cell types. Developed at Harvard Medical School in 2015, the freely shared protocol had previously only been used in animal cells.

    "This is really important in understanding plant biology," said lead researcher Diane Dickel, a scientist at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab). "Like humans and mice, plants have multiple cell and tissue types within them. But learning about plants on a cellular level is a little bit harder because, unlike animals, plants have cell walls, which make it hard to open the cells up for genetic study."

    For many of the genes in plants, we have little to no understanding of what they actually do, Dickel explained. "But by knowing exactly what cell type or developmental stage a specific gene is expressed in, we can start getting a toehold into its function. In our study, we showed that Drop-seq can help us do this."

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Events: OpenStack, Open Source Day (OSD), and Intel

10 hours 35 min ago
  • OpenStack Keeps One Eye on the Prize, One Over Its Shoulder

    The OpenStack Foundation (OSF) used its recent Open Infrastructure Show (OIS) to remind the open source community of its importance, maturity, and flexibility. But the event also showed that the group understands that the virtualized infrastructure environment is evolving rapidly.

    I must admit that heading into the OIS event I was not expecting much. Conversations I have had over the past year continued to show a strong core of OpenStack supporters, but it seemed that the platform’s innovative spirit was diminishing. And in such a rapidly evolving technology segment, any sort of diminishing momentum is the equivalent of going backwards.

  • Open Source Day 2019 focuses on the cloud, security and development

    The 12th edition of Open Source Day (OSD) will take place today at the Legia Warsaw Stadium in Poland’s capital city.

    The event will include presentations, forums and nine technical sessions spanning automation, containerization, cloud computing, virtualization, security, monitoring, CI/CD, software and app development and databases.

  • Inspur and Intel share Rocky testing data at premiere of OpenInfra Summit
  • Intel hosts Open Source Technology Summit - OSTS 19 - Software - News
  • Intel Pushes Open Source Hypervisor With Cloud Giants

    Intel, along with cloud giants Amazon and Google, is working on an open source hypervisor based on the rust-vmm project. The chipmaker discussed this and several other open source efforts at its Open Source Technology Summit, which kicked off yesterday.

    The company “is and has been one of the largest contributors to open source,” said Imad Sousou, Intel corporate vice president and general manager of system software products. “Intel is the No. 1 contributor to the Linux kernel. We write 10% to 12% of the Linux kernel code.” For the record: Red Hat is No. 2, and it contributes about 6%, according to Sousou.

  • Open Source to trickle into AI and Cloud

    Intel’s Clear Linux* Distribution is adding Clear Linux Developer Edition, which includes a new installer and store, bringing together toolkits to give developers an operating system with all Intel hardware features already enabled. Additionally, Clear Linux usages are

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Funniest/Most Insightful Comments Of The Week At Techdirt

10 hours 37 min ago

This week, our first place winner on the insightful side is a very simple anonymous response to a lengthy complaint about Section 230:

Freedom of Speech is more important than your feelings. Period.

In second place, we've got a comment from an exchange on our post about the recent end of our long-running legal dispute. One commenter asserted that we were shown to be "de facto wrong on defamation law", to which Adam Steinbaugh pointed out the district court ruling saying otherwise. The original commenter claimed that because it cost money to mount that defense and achieve that initial ruling dismissing the case, that still somehow means we were wrong about the law, leading Matthew Cline to put forth a rebuttal:

If you defend yourself against a lawsuit and win, the fact that winning cost money doesn't make you wrong.

For editor's choice on the insightful side, we start out with a comment from Stephen T. Stone taking on the now-tired complaints about social media companies violating free speech:

Using a service such as Facebook is a societal privilege, not a legal right. If someone could legally sue that service over a ban — and have a court overturn that ban — it would upend the First Amendment’s protections for association. As for “true diversity” and ideologies and such in yuor last paragraph: (A) Prove that multiple platforms are collaborating with one another to deny specific ideologies a place on those platforms, and (B) recognize that true neutrality/“diversity” would burden a platform with hosting speech and speakers that the administrators of said platform have already chosen not to host.

Next, we've got a thorough response from James Burkhardt to the claim that disclosure of classified material is treason:

Disclosure of Classified material is not, by the constitutional definition, sufficient for the charge of Treason. For instance, a non-citizen (someone who does not owe allegiance to the US) could disclose classified material and can not, by definition, be charged with treason.

Moreover, while disclosure of classified material might fit the definition of treason, there are a number of other requirements and restrictions within the consitution and the law established by congress:

Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason...

Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.

Disclosure of classified material could be considered adhering to the enemies of the US, however proving that requires a showing of intent, and whom you disclose the information to can significantly change that analysis. Which is why we have the crime of espionage, which Courts have barred from allowing an intent analysis.

Moreover, International law (these were extraterritorial murders, after all) and the UCMJ explicitly do not allow "I was just following orders" as a defense against the killing of non-combatants and that such orders should be disobeyed. Under this principle, disobeying the commands of higher ups and exposing the continued killing of non-combatants would appear to be the right action to take. Courts do seem to have disagreed, but that ruling was not in place when the events in question occurred.

Over on the funny side, we've got a double-winner in Stephen T. Stone. In first place, it's a summary of the general desire some folks have to make platforms responsible for everything, and get anything they don't like taken down:

Ah yes, the Defamatory Intent Prevention and Sequestration of Harmful Internet Topics Act.

In second place, it's a response to the Miami plastic surgeon who sued patients for negative reviews:

It’s all in how you say it.

He went from “It’s the Boob God!” to “it’s the boob, God…” with one lawsuit.

For editor's choice on the funny side, we start out with That One Guy expressing a general sentiment about the week:

Journalist admits mistake on 230 and corrects original article...

USPTO is actually right for once...

Alright, who turned on Hell's air conditioner?

And last but not least, we've got CSI: Houston with a response to the critical question of whether apathy is better or worse than corruption and/or incompetence:

I don't know and I don't care.

That's all for this week, folks!



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Latest Openwashing

10 hours 40 min ago

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Google: TensorFlow, Open Hardware and More on Collaboration

10 hours 44 min ago
  • Beginner's guide for TensorFlow: The basics of Google's machine-learning library

    It is an open-source, accelerated-math library designed to help developers build and train machine-learning models using a wide range of hardware — CPUs, GPUs, and even specialized chips such as TPUs (Tensor Processing Units).

    While TensorFlow was originally designed for use with more powerful machines, it has evolved to be able to create models to run in all sorts of unlikely places, from browsers to low-power IoT devices. Today, TensorFlow can be used with a wide range of programming languages, including Python, Go, C++, Java, Swift, R, Julia, C#, Haskell, Rust, and JavaScript.

  • Google extends lowRISC FOSSi partnership

    Unlike proprietary processors, the design and instruction set architecture (ISA) for which are kept behind a typically expensive licence wall, free and open source silicon (FOSSi) does what it says on the tin: Projects like RISC-V provide both the ISA and key implementations under permissive licences, allowing anyone to use, modify, distribute, and commercialise the technology without a single license or royalty payment - including, in many cases, the ability to create a proprietary implementation, should they so choose.

    Following on from the news that it was a founding member of the Linux Foundation's CHIPS Alliance, an industry group set up to 'host and curate high-quality open source code relevant to the design of silicon devices', Google has now announced that it is extending its existing partnership with the lowRISC project to include additional funding, support, and the appointment of two Google staffers as board members on the project.

  • Google wants an open source silicon community for chip design

    As evidenced by Android and Chromium, Google has long been committed to open source software. The company now wants to foster a similar community for hardware and chip design, particularly open source silicon.

  • To Create Prosperity, Free Market Competition Isn’t Enough—You Need Collaboration Too

    What’s ironic is that all of this communal activity isn’t driven by beret-wearing revolutionaries plotting in coffee houses, but by many of today’s most powerful and profit-driven corporations, who act not out of altruism, but self-interest. The fact is that technology firms today who do not actively participate in open source communities are at a significant competitive disadvantage.

    For example, Chris DiBona, Director of Open Source at Google, once told me, “We released Android as an open source product because we knew that was the fastest way to grow adoption, which enabled us to preserve the relationships with customers for businesses like search, maps and Gmail.” That is the reality of today’s marketplace. You collaborate in order to compete effectively. Businesses that don’t accept that simple fact will find it difficult to survive.

    Science’s commitment to communal effort is not at all new, but is a thread running deep in America’s long history of technological dominance. And it’s not all about private companies competing with each other, either: it’s about how the market can benefit from public investment. When Vannevar Bush submitted his famous report, “Science, The Endless Frontier,” to President Truman at the end of World War II, he argued that scientific discovery should be considered a public good crucial to the competitiveness of the nation. The crux of his argument is that such efforts build capacity through creating what he called “scientific capital” and pointed out that “New products and new processes do not appear full-grown. They are founded on new principles and new conceptions, which in turn are painstakingly developed by research in the purest realms of science.”

read more

FOSS in Telco

10 hours 52 min ago
  • The benefits of open source networking for enterprise IT

    Open source software has proved its benefits for various aspects of the IT community in terms of costs, agility and flexibility. Open source networking software is in its early stages of deployment among enterprises. Meantime, hyperscale cloud providers and the largest service providers have made effective use of open source networking.

    It is standard in large IT organizations to consider open source software alongside packaged software and SaaS as part of their IT architecture. Enterprise IT shops frequently deploy open source software in test environments and when designing new applications, like in DevOps.

    IT organizations report a range of benefits from open source software, including innovative design, time to market and agility. While open source software helps reduce some costs, deployment in production environments is generally accompanied by a vendor-supplied support contract.

  • How “Lab as a Service” supports OPNFV and ONAP development

    The Interoperability Lab at the University of New Hampshire (UNH-IOL) is a community resource that allows developers and open source users to have access to resources that they might not have themselves. The “Lab as a Service” provides the necessary shared compute and networking resources for developers working on projects such as OPNFV. Access is remote via a VPN connection, so it acts like a remote server. Those new to OPNFV can create a virtual deployment on a single node and run small VNFs on top. It gives developers access to a bare metal system for low level checking and installs. The next step is to add better support for multi-node usage, integrating the CI work that's being done in the OPNFV project and making the system more compatible with ONAP development.

  • The modern data center and the rise in open-source IP routing suites

    Primarily, what the operators were looking for was a level of control in managing their network which the network vendors couldn’t offer. The revolution burned the path that introduced open networking, and network disaggregation to the work of networking. Let us first learn about disaggregation followed by open networking.

  • Tracking Telco Progress in Open Networking

    I recently attended the Open Infrastructure Summit (formerly the OpenStack Summit -- more on this later). While the conference has gotten smaller, I didn't hear any complaints. Instead, people attending recognized that the developers who showed up came to work on real problems, rather than to cheerlead for the latest technology. Despite some of the dire headlines of the past year, I did not sense a crisis or panic.

  • Exclusive: Google suspends some business with Huawei after Trump blacklist
  • 5G and #Huawei – Trade wars can be prevented by using Open Source

    Consumer Choice Center Managing Director Fred Roeder stressed that more openness and transparency of telephone and radio networks could lead to more trust in the soft- and hardware of infrastructure providers: “Outright bans by country of origin should only be the last resort for policy makers. Bans risk getting the global economy deeper into costly trade wars. Consumers benefit from competition and the fast rollout of new technologies such as 5G networks. At the same time, we are worried about vulnerabilities and potential backdoors in equipment and software. Closed systems have a much higher likelihood of hiding vulnerabilities. Hence more open systems and open source approaches can really help consumers, and governments, trust the security promises of 5G providers,” said Roeder.

    “Private efforts such as the Open Radio Access Network Alliance show that open source systems are an option for telecommunication infrastructure. It would be a win-win situation for consumers and industry if more companies would embrace open standards. An open source approach in telecommunications could revolutionize market access and rollout pace of new standards in the era of 5G, in the same way as blockchain does in the financial services and payment industry. Manufacturers that commit to open source systems show that they don’t have any vulnerabilities to hide, and at the same time have a compelling case not to be excluded on the basis of their country of origin,” he added.

  • Why 5G is a huge future threat to privacy

    The next-generation of mobile communications, 5G, is currently a hot topic in two very different domains: technology – and politics. The latter is because of President Trump’s attempts to shut the Chinese telecoms giant Huawei out of Western procurement projects. That might work in the US, but the move is meeting a lot of resistance in Europe.

    There seem to be two primary concerns about allowing Chinese companies to build the new 5G infrastructure. One is a fear that it will help China consolidate its position as the leading nation in 5G technologies, and that it could come to be the dominant supplier of 5G hardware and software around the world. The other is more directly relevant to this blog: a worry that if Chinese companies install key elements of 5G systems, they will be able to spy on all the traffic passing through them. As the South China Morning Post reports, in an attempt to soothe those fears, Huawei has even promised to sign “no-spy agreements with governments“. That’s a rather ridiculous suggestion – as if signing an agreement would prevent Chinese intelligence agencies from using Huawei equipment for surveillance if they could.

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Linux Kernel’s Perf Now Supports Zstd-Compressed Trace Recording

10 hours 58 min ago

Late updates to the Linux kernel's perf subsystem introduces support for compressed recording of traces, which can yield a three to five time reduction in file-size.

The run-time trace compression and auto-decompression is actually a very useful feature in the context of the Perf subsystem with those records easily hitting many GB in size if making a recording of the events for any real length of time.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Limor Fried, AC2SN, is Recipient of 2019 Women in Open Source Award
    Nominations for this year’s awards were accepted for two categories: “Academic” for those currently enrolled in a college or university, and “Community” for those working on or volunteering with projects related to open source. A panel of judges determined finalists based on nomination criteria, and the public voted to determine the award winners.
  • Introducing GopenPGP, an open source encryption library for native applications
    Open source is a core principle of ProtonMail. We’re excited to make even more of our code available for independent inspection and use by the developer community. In 2016, ProtonMail became the maintainer of OpenPGP.js, the world’s most widely used Javascript email encryption library. Since then we have updated the library with new features, such as streaming encryption; assisted developers to adopt the library in their own applications; and submitted the library to independent security audits. Today, we are happy to announce another open source project that will be maintained by ProtonMail: GopenPGP. This project consists of a high-level OpenPGP library, as well as a fork of the golang crypto library. We started this project to make it easier for mobile and desktop developers to use OpenPGP encryption in their apps.
  • Gab's New Strategy: Fork Open-Source Software And Add Bitcoin
    After Keybase announced integration of Stellar on its platform, Gab has threatened to fork the open-source chat software and swap its XLM wallet...
  • Seven Major Trends in the Cryptoasset Industry, According to ConsenSys
    Web 3.0 Development Will Mostly Be Open-Sourced, But “Not Free” As confirmed by ConsenSys, open-source projects like OpenSSL Software and also open-source blockchain and crypto-related initiatives are, for the most part, operating on relatively low budgets due to lack of adequate funding. Although the management at ConsenSys believes Web 3.0, an evolving set of protocols and standards for the new internet, will be created mainly through open-source development projects, it also noted that the world wide web of the future will not be developed “for free.” On May 11, 2019, Ethereum co-founders Vitalik Buterin and Joseph Lubin announced they had donated 1,000 ether (each) to Moloch DAO, an initiative aimed at acquiring funding for the ongoing development of Ethereum’s open-source ecosystem.
  • UPenn Medicine's AI tool for data analytics is open-source, free to the public
    An automated system that uses machine learning for data analysis is completely open-source and free to use, thanks to the Institute for Biomedical Informatics at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine. Penn AI is designed to be used by anyone interested in AI, regardless of experience level, from high school students to trained researchers. Users can either import their own datasets for analysis within the tool or use one of the hundreds provided by UPenn.
  • Former Chef Software CTO talks IT automation, open source
    Adam Jacob: I'll eventually start another company and do something in enterprise software, because that's where my expertise is, and that's what I like. But I don't know exactly what it'll be or when. We have to build the system that makes people effective at adopting new technology -- whatever it is, wherever it may be in the stack -- that they need to run their business more effectively, instead of just the next platform. Things like serverless are interesting, because they point the way to the user experience, and they're going to get adopted and have value. Are they the future of enterprise computing? Maybe for a minute. But then, there'll be something else. And until we get good at navigating those transitions, which we're completely bad at right now, I don't know that it matters.
  • XJTLU brings Moodle - one of the world's most popular open source learning platform - event to China for first time
    On May 19, Dr Dougiamas, founder and CEO of Moodle, will deliver the keynote address at China's inaugural MoodleMoot, a conference held around the world to encourage collaboration and sharing of best practices of Moodle. China MoodleMoot, part of XJTLU's 2019 Annual Conference on Higher Education Innovation, will see Dr Dougiamas share his experience in using technology to transform teaching and learning. Dr Dougiamas, who developed the Moodle software as part of his PhD in Australia and went on to release it to the world as an open source technology in 2002, says he is looking forward to discussing the future of Moodle in China. "Anecdotally, we know many people use Moodle in China - we hope to see many of them at the first China MoodleMoot to help plan the future of Moodle, and open technology in general, in China," he says.
  • Acquia Acquires Mautic, Open-Source Marketing Automation Firm
    Hurley adds that “advancements in AI, voice, and connected devices” are raising consumer expectations, and claims that what Drupal did for the web, Elastic did for search and MongoDB did for databases, Mautic is now doing for marketing automation.
  • Acquia Delivers Open Source Framework for Contextual Commerce
  • Why Drupal matters
    After a number of complaints from the Drupal community, the Drupal Association finally removed the seemingly odd tagline “community plumbing” from its home page a few years ago (the word “plumbing” doesn’t make good SEO for a digital platform, you see).

Databases: NoSQL, EnterpriseDB and RavenDB

  • Top Open source NoSQL database programs
    NoSql, it stands for Not Only SQL, refers to the non-relational database. The next generation database mainly addresses several key points: non-relational, distributed, open source, and horizontally scalable. The non-relational database has developed very rapidly due to its own characteristics. The NoSQL database was created to solve the challenges brought by the multiple data types of large-scale data collection, especially the big data application problem. It also supports easy replication, simple APIs, final consistency (non-ACID), and large data. It is stored by us with the most key-values, and of course other document types, column stores, graph databases, XML databases, and so on. Here are some top available NoSQL database programs in Open source or free category.
  • We need a new type of open source event - here's why
    Open source events tend to focus on developers, this needs to change says EnterpriseDB's Jan Karremans
  • RavenDB Adds Pull Replication and Distributed Online Counters to Its Open Source NoSQL Document Database Offering

FOSS in Education and Sharing

  • The Untapped Potential of Making and Makerspaces
    Makerspaces are physical locations with equipment that students can use to undertake do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. Arguably, they have been around for decades; we just haven’t used the name makerspace. At my institution, the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, we’ve had a student-run DIY craft shop on our campus for more than 20 years. The difference between older forms of makerspaces like that craft shop and emerging ones is that the latter focus more heavily on digital making, such as 3-D design and printing, digital fabrication (sometimes called “FabLabs”), or the programming of open-source electronic hardware like the Arduino microcontroller. What is also new are the maker practices or principles of: 1) licensing digital designs and how-to instructions under a Creative Commons or similar copyright license and 2) openly sharing those designs through internet-enabled, cloud-based maker websites. Licenses chosen usually permit the sharing of the work with author attribution and, in some cases, permit new users to adapt and remix the work for other purposes. For example, at Thingiverse.com, 3-D modelers openly share their digital designs in this manner.
  • Global Learning Xprize splits $10M purse for best teaching app for disadvantaged kids
    These finalists were then subjected to field testing in Tanzania, where 8,000 Pixel C tablets generously donated by Google for the purpose were distributed to communities where teaching was hardest to come by and literacy rates lowest.
  • Tech That Makes Us Better Humans: JavaScript, Shudder, Chat Apps, Concordia, Signia
    Technology is a medium; sometimes it’s a humanizing, enchanting one. “Something about the interior life of a computer remains infinitely interesting to me; it’s not romantic, but it is a romance,” writes Paul Ford in his WIRED essay “Why I (Still) Love Tech.” “You flip a bunch of microscopic switches really fast and culture pours out.” To accompany Ford’s essay, we reached out to a bunch of people to ask them about the technology they love—the tools that make them better at being human. Here’s what we heard back.
  • Open-source RNA Analysis Tool Takes Root in Plant Biology
    An open-source RNA analysis platform has been successfully used on plant cells for the first time - a breakthrough that could herald a new era of fundamental research and bolster efforts to engineer more efficient food and biofuel crop plants. The technology, called Drop-seq, is a method for measuring the RNA present in individual cells, allowing scientists to see what genes are being expressed and how this relates to the specific functions of different cell types. Developed at Harvard Medical School in 2015, the freely shared protocol had previously only been used in animal cells. "This is really important in understanding plant biology," said lead researcher Diane Dickel, a scientist at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab). "Like humans and mice, plants have multiple cell and tissue types within them. But learning about plants on a cellular level is a little bit harder because, unlike animals, plants have cell walls, which make it hard to open the cells up for genetic study." For many of the genes in plants, we have little to no understanding of what they actually do, Dickel explained. "But by knowing exactly what cell type or developmental stage a specific gene is expressed in, we can start getting a toehold into its function. In our study, we showed that Drop-seq can help us do this."

Events: OpenStack, Open Source Day (OSD), and Intel

  • OpenStack Keeps One Eye on the Prize, One Over Its Shoulder
    The OpenStack Foundation (OSF) used its recent Open Infrastructure Show (OIS) to remind the open source community of its importance, maturity, and flexibility. But the event also showed that the group understands that the virtualized infrastructure environment is evolving rapidly. I must admit that heading into the OIS event I was not expecting much. Conversations I have had over the past year continued to show a strong core of OpenStack supporters, but it seemed that the platform’s innovative spirit was diminishing. And in such a rapidly evolving technology segment, any sort of diminishing momentum is the equivalent of going backwards.
  • Open Source Day 2019 focuses on the cloud, security and development
    The 12th edition of Open Source Day (OSD) will take place today at the Legia Warsaw Stadium in Poland’s capital city. The event will include presentations, forums and nine technical sessions spanning automation, containerization, cloud computing, virtualization, security, monitoring, CI/CD, software and app development and databases.
  • Inspur and Intel share Rocky testing data at premiere of OpenInfra Summit
  • Intel hosts Open Source Technology Summit - OSTS 19 - Software - News
  • Intel Pushes Open Source Hypervisor With Cloud Giants
    Intel, along with cloud giants Amazon and Google, is working on an open source hypervisor based on the rust-vmm project. The chipmaker discussed this and several other open source efforts at its Open Source Technology Summit, which kicked off yesterday. The company “is and has been one of the largest contributors to open source,” said Imad Sousou, Intel corporate vice president and general manager of system software products. “Intel is the No. 1 contributor to the Linux kernel. We write 10% to 12% of the Linux kernel code.” For the record: Red Hat is No. 2, and it contributes about 6%, according to Sousou.
  • Open Source to trickle into AI and Cloud
    Intel’s Clear Linux* Distribution is adding Clear Linux Developer Edition, which includes a new installer and store, bringing together toolkits to give developers an operating system with all Intel hardware features already enabled. Additionally, Clear Linux usages are