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Updated: 34 min 17 sec ago

To space and beyond with open source

20 hours 32 min ago

Carl Sagan once said, "The universe is a pretty big place. If it's just us, seems like an awful waste of space." In that vast desert of seeming nothingness hides some of the most mysterious and beautiful creations humankind ever has—or ever will—witness.


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Perceiving Python programming paradigms

Friday 18th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

Early each year, TIOBE announces its Programming Language of The Year. When its latest annual TIOBE index report came out, I was not at all surprised to see Python again winning the title, which was based on capturing the most search engine ranking points (especially on Google, Bing, Yahoo, Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube, and Baidu) in 2018.


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How to use Protobuf for data interchange

Friday 18th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

Protocol buffers (Protobufs), like XML and JSON, allow applications, which may be written in different languages and running on different platforms, to exchange data. For example, a sending application written in Go could encode a Go-specific sales order in Protobuf, which a receiver written in Java then could decode to get a Java-specific representation of the received order. Here is a sketch of the architecture over a network connection:


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How I built and maintain Cantata, an open source music player

Friday 18th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

This is the third in a series of conversations with developers who build and maintain open source music players. Craig Drummond is the developer and maintainer of Cantata, an open source music player that acts as a frontend (client) to the Music Player Daemon (MPD) music server. I have two small headless computers at home configured as music servers—one connected to our stereo in our living room, one in my upstairs office.


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Intro to the Linux useradd command

Thursday 17th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

Adding a user is one of the most fundamental exercises on any computer system; this article focuses on how to do it on a Linux system.

Before getting started, I want to mention three fundamentals to keep in mind. First, like with most operating systems, Linux users need an account to be able to log in. This article specifically covers local accounts, not network accounts such as LDAP. Second, accounts have both a name (called a username) and a number (called a user ID). Third, users are typically placed into a group. Groups also have a name and group ID.


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How to type emoji on Linux

Thursday 17th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

Emoji are those fanciful pictograms that snuck into the Unicode character space. They're all the rage online, and people use them for all kinds of surprising things, from signifying reactions on social media to serving as visual labels for important file names. There are many ways to enter Unicode characters on Linux, but the GNOME desktop makes it easy to find and type an emoji.


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Measuring the business value of open source communities

Thursday 17th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

In Measuring the health of open source communities, I covered some of the key questions and metrics that we’ve explored as part of the CHAOSS project as they relate to project founders, maintainers, and contributors. In this article, we focus on open source corporate constituents (such as open source program offices, business risk and legal teams, human resources, and others) and end users.


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Open source interior design with Sweet Home 3D

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

There are three schools of thought on how to go about decorating a room:


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Predicting NFL play outcomes with Python and data science

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

If you made through part 1, congrats! You have the patience it takes to format data. In that article, I cleaned up my National Football League data set using a few Python libraries and some basic football knowledge. Picking up where I left off, it's time to take a closer look at my data set.


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Drupal shows leadership on diversity and inclusion

Wednesday 16th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

I didn't expect DrupalCon Seattle's opening keynote to address the barriers that hold people back from making open source contributions. So imagine my surprise when Dries Buytaert, Drupal's project lead and co-founder and CTO of Acquia, which created Drupal, used his time onstage to share an apology.


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Why I use rxvt as my terminal

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

I'm a fan of Konsole and GNOME Terminal, and I use them both regularly. They're great projects, and they represent modern terminals that meet the needs of users who spend their day in a shell, as well as users who only dip into a Unix shell every now and again. They integrate nicely into a desktop environment, bridging the gap between common GUI tasks and common shell tasks. I use GNOME Terminal at work and Konsole at home, and I enjoy them both.


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Formatting NFL data for doing data science with Python

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

No matter what medium of content you consume these days (podcasts, articles, tweets, etc.), you'll probably come across some reference to data. Whether it's to back up a talking point or put a meta-view on how data is everywhere, data and its analysis are in high demand.

As a programmer, I've found data science to be more comparable to wizardry than an exact science. I've coveted the ability to get ahold of raw data and glean something useful and concrete from it. What a useful talent!


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How GNOME uses Git

Tuesday 15th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

“What’s your GitLab?” is one of the first questions I was asked on my first day working for the GNOME Foundation—the nonprofit that supports GNOME projects, including the desktop environment, GTK, and GStreamer. The person was referring to my username on GNOME’s GitLab instance.


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How to make a Halloween lantern with Inkscape

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:03:00 AM

The spooky season is almost here! This year, decorate your haunt with a unique Halloween lantern made with open source!

Typically, a portion of a lantern's structure is opaque to block the light from within. What makes a lantern a lantern are the parts that are missing: windows cut from the structure so that light can escape. While it's impractical for lighting, a lantern with windows in spooky shapes and lurking silhouettes can be atmospheric and a lot of fun to create.


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My Linux story: I grew up on PC Magazine not candy

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

In 1998, the movie Titanic was released, mobile phones were just a luxury, and pagers were still in use. This was also the year I got my first computer. I can remember the details as if it were yesterday: Pentium 133MHz and just 16MB of memory. Back in that time (while running nothing less than Windows 95), this was a good machine. I can still hear in my mind the old spinning hard drive noise when I powered that computer on, and see the Windows 95 flag.


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Pros and cons of event-driven security

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

Great news, everyone! Forrester Research says that 95% of all recorded breaches in 2016 came from only three industries: government, technology, and retail. Everyone else is safe... ish, right?


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System76 will ship Coreboot-powered firmware, a new OS for the apocalypse, and more open source news

Sunday 13th of October 2019 06:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we cover System76 shipping Coreboot-powered firmware, a new OS for the apocalypse, and more open source news!


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Everything you need to know about Grace Hopper in six books

Friday 11th of October 2019 07:02:00 AM

Grace Hopper is one of those iconic figures that really needs no introduction. During her long career in the United States Navy, she was a key figure in the early days of modern computing. If you have been involved in open source or technology in general, chances are you have already heard several anecdotes about Grace Hopper. The story of finding the first computer bug, perhaps? Or maybe you have heard some of her nicknames: Queen of Code, Amazing Grace, or Grandma COBOL?


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How a business was built on podcasts for Linux: The story of Jupiter Broadcasting

Friday 11th of October 2019 07:01:00 AM

I spend a lot of time on the road and enjoy listening to podcasts about a variety of topics.


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5 ways to contribute to open source during Hacktoberfest

Friday 11th of October 2019 07:00:00 AM

There's always a lot to get excited about in October: sweater weather, pumpkin spice, Halloween costumes, and for the last three years, Hacktoberfest.


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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to install Chromium on Ubuntu using SNAP
  • 3D using Godot

    It is time for another installment of Godot (previous entries: introduction, 2D). This time, I have dived into the world of 3D. The goal is to recreate parts of an old time favorite: Kosmonaut. Something I remember playing a lot on my dad’s 286 with amazing EGA graphics. The state of the game when writing can be seen in the short screen capture below. This is more of a tech demo status than a full game at the moment, but I hope you will still find it interesting. You can also get the complete source code. [...] Once we have a world with a track (the grid map), we add a player to the scene (the yellow blob in the image above – I need to learn Blender to create a proper ship). The player scene contains the ship – and the camera. This means that the camera follows the player automatically – very convenient. The player script is responsible for this ship’s movements based on user input. Inputs can either be pressed for a long time, used for sideways movement, or just tapped (i.e. the release is ignored), used for jumping. Each of the inputs are mapped to a keyboard key (or other input device) in the Project Settings dialog, under the Input Map tab. This feels a bit awkward to me and makes me lose the feeling of flow – but I don’t know how to do it better.

  • How to install OpenOffice on Linux
  • How To Install Free SSL Certificate for Apache on CentOS 8
  • Install VirtualBox 6 on CentOS 8
  • How to Install Odoo 13 on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to Install Anaconda on Debian 10
  • Install Shutter Screenshot Tool via PPA in Ubuntu 19.10

Xfce 4.16 development phase starting

In the 4.14 cycle we tried to do a 1:1 port of what used to be our Gtk2 desktop environment, avoiding visual changes. In the 4.16 cycle we plan to harmonize the appearance of certain elements that either became inconsistent through the port or already were inconsistent before (e.g. toolbars or inline toolbars). We will also play with client-side decorations where we feel it makes sense (for instance replacing the so-called XfceTitledDialog, that is used for all settings dialogs with a HeaderBar version). Before anyone gets too excited (both positively or negatively): It is not planned to redesign more complex applications (like Thunar) with Headerbars in 4.16. We will however try to keep the experience and looks consistent, which means gradually moving to client side decorations also with our applications (please note that client side decorations are not the same as HeaderBars!). Through this change e.g. “dark modes” in applications will look good (see the part about the Panel below). Now before there is a shitstorm about this change I would kindly ask everyone to give us time to figure out what exactly we want to change in this cycle. Also, switching to client-side decorations alone is not a big visual departure – feel free to also dig through the client-side decorations page if you want to read/see more on this. Read more

GNU/Linux Distros on Distrotest

  • Some New Operating Systems on Distrotest that Caught My Attention!

    Distrotest is one site that provides a variety of Linux distributions that can be run directly on the browser. Or you can also run it on a remote desktop client application, for example using Remmina. So, you can try various linux distributions online without having to install it or make a live CD. when I visited the distrotest. Apparently, there have been many new systems added. However, there are several new systems that caught my attention.

  • Forbes Raves Upcoming Linux Desktop Will 'Embarass' Windows 10 and macOS

    The article points out that Deepin is also a stand-alone desktop environment for any current Linux distribution -- and that it's one of the 248 operating systems available for online testing at DistroTest.net.

kwin-lowlatency 5.17 Brings A Better Experience To The KDE Desktop

Following this week's release of KDE Plasma 5.17, a new release of the independent kwin-lowlatency code has been re-based against version 5.17. Read more