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Updated: 2 hours 2 min ago

Build a distributed NoSQL database with Apache Cassandra

6 hours 59 min ago

Recently, I got a rush request to get a three-node Apache Cassandra cluster with a replication factor of two working for a development job. I had little idea what that meant but needed to figure it out quickly—a typical day in a sysadmin's job.

Here's how to set up a basic three-node Cassandra cluster from scratch with some extra bits for replication and future node expansion.


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5 notable open source 3D printers

7 hours ago

Open source hardware and 3D printers go together like, well, open source hardware and 3D printers. Not only are 3D printers used to create all sorts of open source hardware—there are also a huge number of 3D printers that have been certified as open source by the Open Source Hardware Association. That fact means that they are freely available to improve and build upon.


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Open Policy Agent: Cloud-native security and compliance

7 hours 1 min ago

Every product or service has a unique way of handling policy and authorization: who-can-do-what and what-can-do-what. In the cloud-native world, authorization and policy are more complex than ever before. As the cloud-native ecosystem evolves, there’s a growing need for DevOps and DevSecOps teams to identify and address security and compliance issues earlier in development and deployment cycles. Businesses need to release software on the order of minutes (instead of months).


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Serverless on Kubernetes, diverse automation, and more industry trends

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 03:00:00 PM

As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.


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The cloud isn't killing open source software

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Over the last few months, I participated in two keynote panels where people asked questions about open source licensing:

  • Do we need to redefine what open source means in the age of the cloud?
  • Are cloud vendors abusing open source?
  • Will open source, as we know it, survive?

Last year was the most eventful in my memory for the usually very conservative open source licensing space:


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A project manager's guide to Ansible

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

From application deployment to provisioning, Ansible is a powerful open source tool for automating routine IT tasks. It can help an organization's IT run smoothly, with core IT processes networked and maintained. Ansible is an advanced IT orchestration solution, and it can be deployed even over a large, complex network infrastructure.


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The infrastructure is code: A story of COBOL and Go

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Old challenges are new again. In this week's Command Line Heroes podcast (Season 3, Episode 5), that thought comes with a twist of programming languages and platforms.


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A brief introduction to learning agility

Tuesday 20th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

I think everyone can agree that the workplace has changed dramatically in the last decade—or is in the process of changing, depending on where you're currently working. The landscape has evolved. Distributed leadership, project-based work models, and cross-functional solution building are commonplace. In essence, the world is going open.


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An introduction to bpftrace for Linux

Monday 19th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Bpftrace is a new open source tracer for Linux for analyzing production performance problems and troubleshooting software. Its users and contributors include Netflix, Facebook, Red Hat, Shopify, and others, and it was created by Alastair Robertson, a talented UK-based developer who has won various coding competitions.


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Moving files on Linux without mv

Monday 19th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

The humble mv command is one of those useful tools you find on every POSIX box you encounter. Its job is clearly defined, and it does it well: Move a file from one place in a file system to another. But Linux is nothing if not flexible, and there are other options for moving files. Using different tools can provide small advantages that fit perfectly with a specific use case.

Before straying too far from mv, take a look at this command’s default results. First, create a directory and generate some files with permissions set to 777:


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WebAssembly for speed and code reuse

Monday 19th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Imagine translating a non-web application, written in a high-level language, into a binary module ready for the web. This translation could be done without any change whatsoever to the non-web application's source code. A browser can download the newly translated module efficiently and execute the module in the sandbox. The executing web module can interact seamlessly with other web technologies—with JavaScript (JS) in particular. Welcome to WebAssembly.


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GNOME and KDE team up on the Linux desktop, docs for Nvidia GPUs open up, a powerful new way to scan for firmware vulnerabilities, and more news

Saturday 17th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look two new powerful data visualization tools, Nvidia open sourcing GPU documentation, exciting new tooling to secure firmware for self-driving cars, and more!


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Writing Kubernetes controllers the wrong way is still useful

Saturday 17th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

When you try to shoehorn an idea, approach, or code into a situation that's not expecting it, you get surprising and fun results.

In his Lightning Talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x), "Writing Kubernetes controllers 'the wrong way' is still useful," sysadmin Chris McEniry shares his experience with an out-of-cluster etcd-controller.


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How to encrypt files with gocryptfs on Linux

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Gocryptfs is a Filesystem in Userspace (FUSE)-mounted file-level encryption program. FUSE-mounted means that the encrypted files are stored in a single directory tree that is mounted, like a USB key, using the FUSE interface. This allows any user to do the mount—you don't need to be root. Because gocryptfs encrypts at the file level, synchronization operations that copy your files can work efficiently on each file.


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How to plan your next IT career move

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

Being part of technology-oriented communities has been an essential part of my career development. The first community that made a difference for me was focused on virtualization. Less than a year into my first career-related job, I met a group of friends who were significant contributors to this "vCommunity," and I found their enthusiasm to be contagious. That began our daily "nerd herd," where a handful of us met nearly every day for coffee before our shifts in tech support.


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Designing open audio hardware as DIY kits

Friday 16th of August 2019 07:00:00 AM

Previously in this series about people who are developing audio technology in the open, I interviewed Juan Rios, developer and maintainer of Guayadeque and Sander Jansen, developer and maintainer of Goggles Music Manager. These conversations have broadened my thinking and helped me enjoy their software even more than before.


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Happy anniversary GNOME: What's your favorite version?

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:03:00 AM

Today is the 22nd anniversary of the first GNOME release. To celebrate, we want to hear from you. What's your favorite GNOME version? And what does your favorite version say about you? Are you change-averse or are you a pioneer of new releases? Take our poll!


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How to record screencasts in GNOME 3

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

GNOME is a free and open source desktop environment used by most GNU/Linux distributions like Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu. It's designed to "get things done with ease, comfort, and control."


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How to create a vanity Tor .onion web address

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:02:00 AM

Tor is a powerful, open source network that enables anonymous and non-trackable (or difficult to track) browsing of the internet. It's able to achieve this because of users running Tor nodes, which serve as intentional detours between two otherwise direct paths. For instance, if you are in New Zealand and visit python.nz, instead of being routed next door to the data center running python.nz, your traffic might be routed to Pittsburgh and then Berlin and then Vanuatu and finally to python.nz.


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12 extensions for your GNOME desktop

Thursday 15th of August 2019 07:01:00 AM

The GNOME desktop is the default graphical user interface for most of the popular Linux distributions and some of the BSD and Solaris operating systems. Currently at version 3, GNOME provides a sleek user experience, and extensions are available for additional functionality.


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More in Tux Machines

Security: Sphinx, Ransomware, Webmin, YubiKey

  • Exposed Sphinx Servers Are No Challenge for Hackers [Ed: That’s the same agency and the same troll site that initially promoted the lies and the FUD about VLC]

    A popular open-source text search server, Sphinx offers impressive performance for indexing and searching data in databases or just in files. It is cross-platform, available for Linux, Windows, macOS, Solaris, FreeBSD, and a few other operating systems. [...] CERT-Bund posted the warning on Twitter today alerting network operators and providers about the risk of running Sphinx servers with a default configuration that are open on the web. The organization highlights that Sphinx lacks any authentication mechanisms. Exposing it on the web gives an attacker the possibility "to read, modify or delete any data stored in the Sphinx database."

  • Ransomware Hits Texas Local Governments [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The attack was observed on the morning of August 16 and appears to have been launched by a single threat actor, the DIR announcement reads.

    The State Operations Center (SOC) was activated soon after the attack reports started to come in, and DIR says that all of the entities that were actually or potentially affected appear to have been identified and notified.

    A total of twenty-three entities have been confirmed as impacted so far, and the responders are working on bringing the affected systems back online.

  • Webmin Backdoored for Over a Year

    The security hole impacts Webmin 1.882 through 1.921, but most versions are not vulnerable in their default configuration as the affected feature is not enabled by default. Version 1.890 is affected in the default configuration. The issue has been addressed with the release of Webmin 1.930 and Usermin version 1.780.

  • The YubiKey 5Ci is the 'first' iOS-compatible security key

    Like other YubiKey options in the 5 series, the YubiKey 5Ci supports multiple authentication protocols, including IDO2/WebAuthn, FIDO U2F, OTP (one-time-password), PIV (Smart Card), and OpenPGP.

Android Leftovers

Analysis of the state of play of Open Source policies in EU Member States

The study on OSS policies will answer the following research questions, each of which will be elaborated upon in dedicated chapters: [...] Read more

Android Leftovers