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Updated: 1 hour 5 min ago

Pi Zero Wireless out now for $10

7 hours 3 min ago

Today, on the fifth anniversary of the release of the original Raspberry Pi, the Foundation has released Pi Zero W, a Pi Zero with built-in WiFi and Bluetooth, for $10.

The original Pi Zero was great (and still is!)—but many people found its lack of wireless connectivity an inconvenience. Now with Zero W, you can connect to the Internet without using any adapters, and you can even use a Bluetooth mouse and keyboard rather than wired USB, or use a Bluetooth speaker for audio.

The latest addition to the Raspberry Pi family has the same specifications as the original Pi Zero:


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MySQL 8 is coming

8 hours 1 min ago

MySQL 8 is coming and it is going to be a big change. MySQL 5.7 has been out for well over a year and has been very well received with its native JSON data type, increased security, and better performance. But there are some things about 5.7 that needed modernization and that is why MySQL 8 is on the way.


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5 new OpenStack guides and walkthroughs

8 hours 2 min ago

OpenStack skills and experience continue to be among the most in-demand sets of knowledge that enterprise IT departments are searching for in new recruits. But with the pace of innovation occurring in the open source cloud, how can you possibly keep up?


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4 stages of open leadership development

8 hours 3 min ago

As I shared in the first part of my "Open Leadership Development" series, we started building our leadership development system at Red Hat many years ago, by finding great leadership training designed for conventional organizations, and adapting it to fit our open organization.


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3 cool machine learning projects using TensorFlow and the Raspberry Pi

Monday 27th of February 2017 08:03:00 AM

In early 2017, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced a Google developer survey, which requested feedback from the maker community on what tools they wanted on the Raspberry Pi. The blog post says that Google has developed tools for machine learning, IoT, wearables, robotics, and home automation, and that the survey mentions face- and emotion-recognition, speech-to-text translation, natural language processing, and sentiment analysis.


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Stateful containerized applications with Kubernetes

Monday 27th of February 2017 08:02:00 AM

To date, almost all of the talk about containers and microservices has been about "stateless" applications. This is entirely understandable because stateless applications are simply easier. However, containers and orchestration have matured to the point where we need to take on the interesting workloads: the stateful ones.


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Win a free copy of the 2016 Open Source Yearbook

Monday 27th of February 2017 08:01:00 AM

If you're still looking to get your hands on a print copy of the 2016 Open Source Yearbook, now's your chance. This week Opensource.com is giving away hardcover copies to five lucky community members.

To enter the Open Source Yearbook Sweepstakes, all you need to do is provide your Opensource.com username and answer two quick questions. The contest ends Sunday, March 5 at 11:59 p.m. EST (GMT -05:00). Good luck!


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A look at OpenStack's newest release, Ocata

Monday 27th of February 2017 06:00:00 AM

Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

OpenStack around the web

From news sites to developer blogs, there's a lot being written about OpenStack every week. Here are a few highlights.


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SteamVR comes to Linux, a new game engine, and more gaming news

Saturday 25th of February 2017 08:00:00 AM

In this edition of our open gaming roundup, we take a look at the SteamVR for Linux beta, a new open source game engine, and more.

Open gaming roundup for February 12-25, 2017


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Top 5: Intro to the Linux boot, a primer on the ESP8266 board, and more

Friday 24th of February 2017 08:20:00 PM

In this week's top 5, I highlight an intro to the Linux boot, a primer on the ESP8266 board, Linux command-line tools for data analysis, a Python script to find corrupted images, and open source applications for a Windows machine.

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Top 5 articles of the week

5. 6 open source tools I use on my Windows machine


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Password management made easy as news of CloudFlare leak surfaces

Friday 24th of February 2017 07:00:00 PM

In the last 24 hours, news broke that a serious Cloudflare bug has been causing sensitive data leaks since September, exposing 5.5 million users across thousands of websites. In addition to login data cached by Google and other search engines, it is possible that some iOS applications have been affected as well.


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Top 3 machine learning libraries for Python

Friday 24th of February 2017 08:02:00 AM

You don't have to be a data scientist to be fascinated by the world of machine learning, but a few travel guides might help you navigate the vast universe that also includes big data, artificial intelligence, and deep learning, along with a large dose of statistics and analytics.


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Tying together the many open source projects in networking

Friday 24th of February 2017 08:01:00 AM

There are a lot of pieces to the ongoing network transformation going up and down the stack. There's the shift away from proprietary hardware. There's the to need to manage complex network configurations. Add subscriber management and a wide range of other necessary functions. Add customer-facing services. All of those pieces need to fit together, integrate with each other, and interoperate.


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Which is the best programming language for beginners?

Friday 24th of February 2017 08:00:00 AM

What is the best language for a budding programmer to get their start with? There are probably as many opinions about which language is best for beginners as there are languages to choose from. And the options change all of the time. When we asked this question two years ago, Python came out on top as the clear winner. But is it still the best choice today?


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10 command-line tools for data analysis in Linux

Thursday 23rd of February 2017 08:03:00 AM

So you've landed on some data you want to analyze. Where do you begin?

Many people used to working in a graphical environment might default to using a spreadsheet tool, but there's another way that might prove to be faster and more efficient, with just a little more effort. And you don't need to become an expert in a statistical modeling language or a big data toolset to take advantage of these tools.

You can learn a lot about a dataset without ever leaving your terminal.
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How does the PocketCHIP compare to the Raspberry Pi?

Thursday 23rd of February 2017 08:02:00 AM

When the Raspberry Pi hit the tech scene, it made a huge impact. It wasn't the first tiny computer, by any means—the Chumby, the PogoPlug, and other hackable systems on chips preceded it—but there hadn't been anything quite so intentionally open and affordable as the Pi. You didn't have to hack the Pi, you just put an OS on an SD card, booted, and you were running an open source computer. The computer you were running only used a dozen watts of power, and it wasn't encased in a bulky plastic body that would end up in the landfill when you decided to upgrade.


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Are textbooks in or out? The state of open educational resources

Thursday 23rd of February 2017 08:01:00 AM

Open education is a hot topic in both the K-12 and higher education spaces due to a number of factors, including the desire to make education more affordable.


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What to do when people start hacking your culture

Thursday 23rd of February 2017 08:00:00 AM

I've previously written about the fact the Apache Software Foundation offers an exemplar of large-scale open source governance. Even with those supreme qualities, things can still go wrong. Apache offers some of the best protections for open source contributors but its mature rules can be manipulated by skilled politicians and/or determined agendas. What can we learn from their experience?


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6 open source tools I use on my Windows machine

Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 08:02:00 AM

In most of the places I have worked there has been a centralized computer and application standard that was more or less mandatory for all employees. There are benefits of such an environment, which I will not go into in this piece, but for me, as an open source and Linux enthusiast, I try to use the tools I'm used to and like.

So, I immediately install my favorite applications when I receive a new standardized Windows-based work computer, something I have been lucky enough to be allowed to do.


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A brief intro to building apps with React Native

Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 08:01:00 AM

React Native is a framework for building native apps using React and JavaScript. It allows you to create Android and iOS applications using only one language for both apps. Thousands of apps are using React Native, from established Fortune 500 companies to hot new startups. The best part is that its open source; see the official React Native repository on GitHub.


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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel and Graphics

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more

Tired of Windows and MAC computer systems? Linux may now be ready for prime time

Are you a bit tired of the same old options of salt and pepper, meaning having to choose only between the venerable Windows and MAC computer operating systems? Looking to branch out a bit, maybe take a walk on the wild side, learn some new things and save money? If so, the Linux operating system, which has been around for a long time and is used and loved by many hard-core techies and developers, may now be ready for prime time with the masses. Read more