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Updated: 45 min 29 sec ago

Growing the Duke University eNable chapter

13 hours 44 min ago

We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost.


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OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news

Saturday 3rd of December 2016 08:00:00 AM

In this edition of the open gaming roundup, we take a look at OSVR support in Steam, Unity dropping legacy OpenGL, and more.

Open gaming roundup for November 20-December 3, 2016

OSVR available on Steam

The co-founders of the Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) consortium announced a Steam update that provides support for OSVR content on Steam.


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Top 5: Amazon Echo alternatives, a tutorial on the /dev directory on Linux, and more

Friday 2nd of December 2016 08:30:00 PM

In this week's Top 5, we highlight open source alternatives to the Amazon Echo, a tutorial on the /dev directory for your devices in Linux, our annual holiday gift guide for open source enthusiasts, 15 JavaScript frameworks and libraries to try, and open source alternatives to LastPass.

Win a 3D printer! Enter the 2016 open source holiday giveaway (closes December 4)


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What's new in OpenStack in 2016: A look at the Newton release

Friday 2nd of December 2016 08:01:00 AM

OpenStack is on a six-month release cycle, with each release given a code name starting with consecutive letters of the alphabet. On October 7th, OpenStack Newton was released. Let's look at a few highlights from OpenStack's 2016 Newton release.


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How to care for the community over the code

Friday 2nd of December 2016 08:00:00 AM

At All Things Open 2016, Joe Brockmeier answers the question: How can companies can work effectively with open source communities?

In his talk, Joe reminded us of the #1 open source myth: Open source is comprised of mostly volunteers. The truth is, these days, pretty much any major open source project has people who are paid to work on it. There are always people who do it because they love it, but these days most of us are paid (and still love it). Over the years we have learned that if you want patches in a timely manner, you need people who are paid to do it.


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11 wonderful wearable open source projects

Thursday 1st of December 2016 08:04:00 AM

LEDs are on everything, and almost everyone you know has at least tried a FitBit or similar device, whereas Google Glass didn't really take off. Despite several years of growth, whether wearable electronics are a fad, or here to keep growing from fun to truly functional is too early to tell. Judge for yourself—read through a few of our favorite wearable projects from 2016. You might even get inspired to start creating.


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3 open source password managers

Thursday 1st of December 2016 08:03:00 AM

Maintaining complex, unique passwords for each site and service you use is among the most common pieces of advice that security professionals provide to the public every year.

Yet no matter how many times it is said, it seems like a week doesn't go by where a high-profile hacking story hits the news, revealing that users of the service in question more often than not had such secure passwords as "12345" or "password" as the only wall of protection on their account.


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Finding crucial answers requires open decision making

Thursday 1st of December 2016 08:02:00 AM

How does an open organization make decisions when stakeholders have contradictory priorities? And what if safety and human life are two of those priorities?

In such a scenario, it seems that maximizing safety would supersede any other agenda, but engineering has a long history of failures that show otherwise. With their emphasis on open communication and clear guidelines, open organizations can help ensure those responsible for decisions avoid such failures.


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The Opensource.com preview for December

Thursday 1st of December 2016 08:01:00 AM

Another month, another preview of what Opensource.com has in store for readers. Although this is the last month of the year, expect to continue to see previews coming your way at the start of every month. We've got big plans for 2017!

In November, we ran a short series on open DIY projects:


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Today's #OpenOrgChat: A year in review

Thursday 1st of December 2016 08:00:00 AM

Join us later today for an #OpenOrgChat about "The Open Organization Year in Review"! As usual, we'll gather around the #OpenOrgChat hashtag at 2 p.m. Eastern (14:00 ET/19:00 UTC).

Follow OpenOrgBook and the chat's live stream for updates!

This week's special guests:


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7 tech advent calendars for the holiday season

Wednesday 30th of November 2016 08:02:00 AM

The holiday season is upon us, bringing its special brand of festive chaos to many of our lives. Although this time of year can be a bit busy, many technologists still find the time to hone their skills by participating in a technical advent calendar.

Those raised in the Christian tradition may already be familiar with the idea of an advent calendar: Each day between December first and December 24th (Advent) you get to open a compartment in a special calendar and reveal a treat of some sort.


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Open source dependency management is a balancing act

Wednesday 30th of November 2016 08:01:00 AM

During my career I have spent a lot of time packaging other people's code, writing my own, and working on large software frameworks. I have seen projects that still haven't released a stable version, never quite hitting 1.0, while others made 1.0 releases within months of beginning development, and then quickly moving on to 2.0, 3.0, etc. There is quite a variance in these release cycles, and this coupled with maintaining large projects can make things difficult.


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H5P: A CMS plugin for creating HTML5 interactive content

Wednesday 30th of November 2016 08:00:00 AM

Many educators want to create interactive content for their classroom or online course. If you're not a HTML5 programmer like most of us, but you have heard HTML5 can simplify your work and provide a great, standard web experience for your students, here's how to get started.


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LinuxQuestions.org celebrates sweet 16

Tuesday 29th of November 2016 08:03:00 AM

This month on The Queue, I answer a multi-part question received via email:

Why did you start LinuxQuestions.org? And can you tell us a little about the history of the site?


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What is the Raspberry Pi Foundation? 10 million computers sold

Tuesday 29th of November 2016 08:02:00 AM

With more than 10 million units sold, the Raspberry Pi is a massive success. At this year's All Things Open, community manager Ben Nuttall gave a five-minute lightning talk introducing the educational charity behind the popular mini computer.


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Why open leaders are masters of balance

Tuesday 29th of November 2016 08:01:00 AM

Open leaders are systems thinkers. When they look at the world, they see a series of dynamic relationships—between people, teams, and resources. These relationships are the elements that are always in motion, always in flux, and ultimately drive the success (or failure) of our businesses.


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4 OpenStack guides to help you build your open source cloud

Tuesday 29th of November 2016 08:00:00 AM

In a fast-moving project like OpenStack, it seems like there's more to learn with every day that passed. There are plenty of tools out there to help you keep up, including hands-on training courses, books, and of course the official documentation. And to add to the mix, every month, Opensource.com takes a look back at recent OpenStack tips, tricks, guides, and tutorials created by the open source community that might help you in your journey.


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Open source virtual reality, a new board for electronics testing, Fedora 25, and more news

Monday 28th of November 2016 04:20:00 PM

In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at open source virtual reality, a new board for electronics testing, Fedora 25, and more.

Open source news roundup for November 20-28, 2016


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Managing devices in Linux

Monday 28th of November 2016 08:03:00 AM

There are many interesting features of the Linux directory structure. This month I cover some fascinating aspects of the /dev directory. Before you proceed any further with this article, I suggest that, if you have not already done so, you read my earlier articles, Everything is a file, and An introduction to Linux filesystems, both of which introduce some interesting Linux filesystem concepts.


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15 JavaScript frameworks and libraries

Monday 28th of November 2016 08:02:00 AM

JavaScript is the future.

The language is supported by a number of technololgy leaders, one of whom is WordPress's founder Matt Mullenweg, who hinted that WordPress developers should learn it, clearly sending a message to the WordPress community as to it future importance. The mention was well received. The transition to better technology will enable WordPress to keep up with future challenges.


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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

today's howtos