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Building scalable social media sentiment analysis services in Python

Friday 19th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

The first part of this series provided some background on how sentiment analysis works. Now let's investigate how to add these capabilities to your designs.


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Getting started with social media sentiment analysis in Python

Friday 19th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

Natural language processing (NLP) is a type of machine learning that addresses the correlation between spoken/written languages and computer-aided analysis of those languages. We experience numerous innovations from NLP in our daily lives, from writing assistance and suggestions to real-time speech translation and interpretation.


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This is how System76 does open hardware

Friday 19th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Most people know very little about the hardware in their computers. As a long-time Linux user, I've had my share of frustration while getting my wireless cards, video cards, displays, and other hardware working with my chosen distribution. Proprietary hardware often makes it difficult to determine why an Ethernet controller, wireless controller, or mouse performs differently than we expect.


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How to organize with Calculist: Ideas, events, and more

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:03:00 AM

Thoughts. Ideas. Plans. We all have a few of them. Often, more than a few. And all of us want to make some or all of them a reality.

Far too often, however, those thoughts and ideas and plans are a jumble inside our heads. They refuse to take a discernable shape, preferring instead to rattle around here, there, and everywhere in our brains.


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Electronics designed in 5 different countries with open hardware

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

The Open Source Hardware Association's Hardware Registry lists hardware from 29 different countries on five continents, demonstrating the broad, international footprint of certified open source hardware.


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Level up command-line playgrounds with WebAssembly

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

WebAssembly (Wasm) is a new low-level language designed with the web in mind. Its main goal is to enable developers to compile code written in other languages—such as C, C++, and Rust—into WebAssembly and run that code in the browser. In an environment where JavaScript has traditionally been the only option, WebAssembly is an appealing counterpart, and it enables portability along with the promise for near-native runtimes.


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Simplifying organizational change: A guide for the perplexed

Thursday 18th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

Most organizational leaders have encountered a certain paralysis around efforts to implement culture change—perhaps because of perceived difficulty or the time necessary for realizing our work. But change is only as difficult as we choose to make it. In order to lead successful change efforts, we must simplify our understanding and approach to change.


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6 alternatives to OpsGenie for managing monitoring alerts

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Note from the Editor: the following is the author's point of view related to the topic of managing monitoring systems.

As organizations move toward a new generation of distributed systems and microservice architecture, the DevOps world finds it increasingly difficult to keep up with the hybrid needs of today's application monitoring, and the alerts it generates. Managing this aspect of IT infrastructure has DevOps professionals turning to up-and-coming serverless methodologies for this purpose.


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How to use Ansible to document procedures

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

"Documentation is a love letter that you write to your future self." —Damian Conway

I use Ansible as my personal notebook for documenting coding procedures—both the ones I use often and the ones I rarely use. This process facilitates my work and reduces the time it takes to do repetitive tasks, the ones where specific commands in a certain sequence are executed to accomplish a specific result.


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Inter-process communication in Linux: Sockets and signals

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

This is the third and final article in a series about interprocess communication (IPC) in Linux. The first article focused on IPC through shared storage (files and memory segments), and the second article does the same for basic channels: pipes (named and unnamed) and message queues.


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Building a DNS-as-a-service with OpenStack Designate

Tuesday 16th of April 2019 07:03:00 AM

Designate is a multi-tenant DNS-as-a-service that includes a REST API for domain and record management, a framework for integration with Neutron, and integration support for Bind9.

You would want to consider a DNSaaS for the following:


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Detecting malaria with deep learning

Tuesday 16th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Artificial intelligence (AI) and open source tools, technologies, and frameworks are a powerful combination for improving society. "Health is wealth" is perhaps a cliche, yet it's very accurate! In this article, we will examine how AI can be leveraged for detecting the deadly disease malaria with a low-cost, effective, and accurate open source deep learning solution.


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Can schools be agile?

Tuesday 16th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

We've all had those deja vu moments that make us think "I've seen this before!" I experienced them often in the late 1980s, when I first began my career in industry. I was caught up in a wave of organizational change, where the U.S. manufacturing sector was experimenting with various models that asked leaders, managers, and engineers like me to rethink how we approached things like quality, cost, innovation, and shareholder value.


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Inter-process communication in Linux: Using pipes and message queues

Tuesday 16th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

This is the second article in a series about interprocess communication (IPC) in Linux. The first article focused on IPC through shared storage: shared files and shared memory segments. This article turns to pipes, which are channels that connect processes for communication.


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Blender short film, new license for Chef, ethics in open source, and more news

Monday 15th of April 2019 01:03:00 PM

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the 12th Blender short film, Chef shifts away from open core toward a 100% open source license, SuperTuxKart's latest release candidate with online multiplayer support, and more.

Blender Animation Studio releases Spring


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Troubleshooting slow WiFi on Linux

Monday 15th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

I'm no stranger to diagnosing hardware problems on Linux systems. Even though most of my professional work over the past few years has involved virtualization, I still enjoy crouching under desks and fumbling around with devices and memory modules. Well, except for the "crouching under desks" part. But none of that means that persistent and mysterious bugs aren't frustrating.


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Getting started with Mercurial for version control

Monday 15th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

Mercurial is a distributed version control system written in Python. Because it's written in a high-level language, you can write a Mercurial extension with a few Python functions.

There are several ways to install Mercurial, which are explained in the official documentation. My favorite one is not there: using pip. This is the most amenable way to develop local extensions!


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Inter-process communication in Linux: Shared storage

Monday 15th of April 2019 07:00:00 AM

This is the first article in a series about interprocess communication (IPC) in Linux. The series uses code examples in C to clarify the following IPC mechanisms:


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How libraries are adopting open source

Friday 12th of April 2019 07:02:00 AM

Four years ago, I interviewed Nathan Currulla, co-founder of ByWater Solutions, a major services and solutions provider for Koha, a popular open source integrated library system (ILS).


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What's your primary backup strategy for the /home directory in Linux?

Friday 12th of April 2019 07:01:00 AM

I frequently upgrade to newer releases of Fedora, which is my primary distribution. I also upgrade other distros but much less frequently. I have also had many crashes of various types over the years, including a large portion of self-inflicted ones. Past experience with data loss has made me very aware of the need for good backups.

I back up many parts of my Linux hosts but my /home directory is especially important. Losing any of the data in /home on my primary workstation due to a crash or an upgrade could be disastrous.


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More in Tux Machines

NomadBSD 1.2 released!

We are pleased to announce the release of NomadBSD 1.2! We would like to thank all the testers who sent us feedback and bug reports. Read more

Review: Alpine Linux 3.9.2

Alpine Linux is different in some important ways compared to most other distributions. It uses different libraries, it uses a different service manager (than most), it has different command line tools and a custom installer. All of this can, at first, make Alpine feel a bit unfamiliar, a bit alien. But what I found was that, after a little work had been done to get the system up and running (and after a few missteps on my part) I began to greatly appreciate the distribution. Alpine is unusually small and requires few resources. Even the larger Extended edition I was running required less than 100MB of RAM and less than a gigabyte of disk space after all my services were enabled. I also appreciated that Alpine ships with some security features, like PIE, and does not enable any services it does not need to run. I believe it is fair to say this distribution requires more work to set up. Installing Alpine is not a point-n-click experience, it's more manual and requires a bit of typing. Not as much as setting up Arch Linux, but still more work than average. Setting up services requires a little more work and, in some cases, reading too since Alpine works a little differently than mainstream Linux projects. I repeatedly found it was a good idea to refer to the project's wiki to learn which steps were different on Alpine. What I came away thinking at the end of my trial, and I probably sound old (or at least old fashioned), is Alpine Linux reminds me of what got me into running Linux in the first place, about 20 years ago. Alpine is fast, light, and transparent. It offered very few surprises and does almost nothing automatically. This results in a little more effort on our parts, but it means that Alpine does not do things unless we ask it to perform an action. It is lean, efficient and does not go around changing things or trying to guess what we want to do. These are characteristics I sometimes miss these days in the Linux ecosystem. Read more

today's howtos

Linux v5.1-rc6

It's Easter Sunday here, but I don't let little things like random major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow. The occasional scuba trip? Sure. But everybody sitting around eating traditional foods? No. You have to have priorities. There's only so much memma you can eat even if your wife had to make it from scratch because nobody eats that stuff in the US. Anyway, rc6 is actually larger than I would have liked, which made me go back and look at history, and for some reason that's not all that unusual. We recently had similar rc6 bumps in both 4.18 and 5.0. So I'm not going to worry about it. I think it's just random timing of pull requests, and almost certainly at least partly due to the networking pull request in here (with just over a third of the changes being networking-related, either in drivers or core networking). Read more Also: Linux 5.1-rc6 Kernel Released In Linus Torvalds' Easter Day Message